Category Archives: Resources

Useful Resources

2015-2016 Critical Issues Forum
Useful Resources
Topic: Global Nuclear Vulnerability: Lessons for a More Peaceful World
*Please note that more resources will be added to the section of This year’s topic-specific resources.”

 

General resources

Nuclear Threat Initiative Tutorials

http://tutorials.nti.org/table-of-contents/

Melissa Gillis, “Disarmament: A Basic Guide”, United Nations

((NPT–section 4, beginning on page 31)

http://www.un.org/disarmament/HomePage/ODAPublications/AdhocPublications/PDF/Basic_Guide-2011-web-Rev1.pdf

Which Countries Have Nuclear Weapons-BBC News World-Video
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-24277021

United Nations Audio Visual Library of International Law– NPT
http://legal.un.org/avl/ha/tnpt/tnpt.html

United Nations Disarmament Education
http://www.un.org/disarmament/education/

US State Department–NPT
http://www.state.gov/t/isn/npt/

Nuclear Disarmament Resource Collection
http://www.nti.org/analysis/reports/nuclear-disarmament/

Global Zero Interactive Map
http://www.globalzero.org/map

Nuclear Notebook (for nuclear weapons numbers)
http://bos.sagepub.com/cgi/collection/nuclearnotebook

What is Nuclear?
www.whatisnuclear.com

Nick Touran, “What is Nonproliferation?”
http://www.whatisnuclear.com/articles/proliferation.html

U.S.-Russia Nuclear Arms Control, Council on Foreign Relations
http://www.cfr.org/arms-control-disarmament-and-nonproliferation/us-russia-arms-control/p21620

William Harris, Craig Freudenrich, Ph.D. and John Fuller, “How Nuclear Bombs Work”
http://science.howstuffworks.com/nuclear-bomb.htm

How Stuff Works: Nuclear Weapons
http://science.howstuffworks.com/search.php?terms=nuclear+weapons

Federation of American Scientists: The Nuclear Information Project
http://fas.org/issues/nuclear-weapons/

Nuclear Threat Initiative 3-D Research Model of Facilities
https://www.youtube.com/user/webmasternti2010?feature=mhee

 

This year’s topic-specific resources:

Back to the Nuclear Brink New!                                                                                                                By Daryl G. Kimball March 2016

The Nuclear Threat is More Complex and Unpredictable Than Ever  New!                                     December 31, 2015

See Inside the Underground Bunker That Could Launch a Nuclear War New!                                    By Dan Sagalyn, pbs newshour, Feb 25, 2016.                              

Reducing the Risk of Nuclear War: Taking Nuclear Weapons Off High Alert New! 
Union of Concerned Scientists, Feb 12, 2016.

Six Things You Should Know About the U.S. Nuclear Weapons Arsenal
 New!
On Reinvent.net website, Feb 1, 2016.

Lowering Nuclear Risks: An Interview with Former Defense Secretary William Perry New!
Interviewed by Daniel Horner and Kingston Reif, Arms Control Today, Jan/Feb 2016

The Risk of Nuclear Catastrophe is Greater Today than during the Cold War
 New!
By William J. Perry, The Huffington Post, January 20, 2016

Nuclear weapons risk greater than in cold war, says ex-Pentagon chief
 New!
The Guardian, January 7, 2016

As U.S. Modernizes Nuclear Weapons, ‘Smaller’ Leaves Some Uneasy New!
William Broad and David Sanger, The New York Times, January 11, 2016

Nuclear Weapons Countries: Military Incidents New!
March 2014-November 2015
Global Zero

Beyond the Summit: New Approaches to Nuclear Approaches New!                                                 by Gov Jerry Brown and Sec William J Perry

Future of Life New!

Why you should care about nukes New!

William J. Perry Project Website

My Journey at the Nuclear Brink, (BOOK)
By William Perry, Former US Secretary of Defense
http://www.sup.org/books/title/?id=25448

My Personal Journey At the Nuclear Brink
Dr. William Perry, Former US Secretary of Defense,
http://www.europeanleadershipnetwork.org/my-personal-journey-at-the-nuclear-brink-by-bill-perry_633.html

Close Calls With Nuclear Weapons (Fact Sheet)
Union of Concerned Scientists

Close Calls With Nuclear Weapons
NTI

Avoiding War in Europe: The Risks From NATO-Russian Close Military Encounters
Ian Kearns – Arms Control Association

The Greatest Terrorist Threat: How to Stop Nuclear Material from Falling into the Wrong Hands
Sam Nunn, Richard Lugar, and Des Browne – Politico

Close Encounters: Risking an Accidental War
John Donnelly – CQ

Remembering the Cuban missile crisis, with humility
Benoit Pelopidas – European Leadership Network

NATO War Games Unwittingly Put Soviets and U.S. on ‘Hair Trigger’ in ’83, Analysis Suggests
Sam Roberts – New York Times

How a nuclear near-miss in ’95 would be a disaster today
Theodore Postol – Boston Globe

Disarm and Modernize
John Mecklin – Foreign Policy

5 Cold War Close Calls
Evan Andrews – History

Could U.S.-Russia Tensions go Nuclear?
Bruce Blair – Politico

20 Mishaps that Might Have Started a Nuclear War
Alan F. Philips – Nuclear Files

13 Times the U.S. Almost Destroyed Itself With It’s Own Nuclear Weapons
Bethan Owen – Deseret

Nuclear Command and Control: A History of False Alarms and Near Catastrophes
Eric Schlosser – NPR

Honey, There’s a Nuclear Bomb in the Yard
Japan Times

Analysis/Fact Sheets

Global Zero Report on Nuclear Risk Reduction: De-Alerting and Stabilizing the World’s Nuclear Force Postures
Global Zero

Too Close for Comfort: Cases for Nuclear Use and Options for Policy
Patricia Lewis, Heather Williams, Benoit Pelopidas, and Sasan Aghlani – Chatham House Report

Close Calls With Nuclear Weapons
NTI

Close Calls With Nuclear Weapons (Fact Sheet)
Union of Concerned Scientists

 

Country-specific Information

Arms Control Association
A web source on arms control containing issue briefs, fact sheets, threat assessment briefs, and current event reports.
http://www.armscontrol.org

Nuclear Threat Initiative Country Profiles
http://www.nti.org/e_research/profiles/index.html
 

Multimedia

Movies, videos, interactive maps

The Man Who Saved the World

Fail-Safe

WarGames

Dr. Strangelove

The Bomb
PBS Video
A powerful story of the most destructive invention in human history, outlining how America developed the nuclear bomb, how it changed the world and how it continues to loom large in our lives. Witness the raw power and strangely compelling beauty of rare views of above-ground nuclear tests.
http://video.pbs.org/program/bomb/

NukeMap by Alex Wellerstein
(Interactive Map that allows you to simulate the real life effects of a Nuclear Bomb in any area)

United Nations
http://www.unmultimedia.org/photo/

International Atomic Energy Agency
http://www.iaea.org/newscenter/multimedia

Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Preparatory Commission
http://www.ctbto.org/photos/

EU Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Conference 2015 First Plenary Session
The NPT Review Conference and the Future of Nuclear Disarmament

http://www.iiss.org/en/events/eu%20conference/sections/eu-conference-2015-6aba/plenary-1-b248

 

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION Resources/General Information on Nuclear Disarmament

United Nations
United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs (UNODA)
Main website for sources pertaining to disarmament containing spotlights on recent developments, updates and announcements.
http://www.un.org/disarmament/

United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research
http://www.unidir.org/

Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT)
Text and documents from NPT and PrepCom Conferences.
http://www.un.org/disarmament/WMD/Nuclear/NPT_Review_Conferences.shtml

Applying a Disarmament Lens to Gender, Human Rights, Development, Security, Education and Communication: Six Essays
http://www.un.org/disarmament/HomePage/ODAPublications/CivilSocietyAndDisarmament/2012/NGO_pub_2012.pdf

Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization
Main website for treaty text and status, recent news, international monitoring system status, and updates.
http://www.ctbto.org

 

Nuclear Weapons Free Zones
UNODA

Overview, map, definition
http://www.un.org/disarmament/WMD/Nuclear/NWFZ.shtml

 

Selected NGO/Research Institutes:

Acronym Institute
http://www.acronym.org.uk/

Arms Control Association:
http://www.armscontrol.org

Arms Control Today
http://www.armscontrol.org/aca/428

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
http://www.thebulletin.org/

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace’s Nuclear Policy Program
http://carnegieendowment.org/programs/npp/index.cfm?fa=proj&id=116

Center for Arms Control, Energy, and Environmental Studies
http://www.armscontrol.ru/

Center for Defense Information (joined the Project on Government Oversight)
http://www.pogo.org/about/cdi-joins-pogo.html

Center for Strategic and International Studies
http://www.csis.org/

Federation of American Scientists
http://www.fas.org

Global Security Institute
http://www.gsinstitute.org/

GlobalSecurity.org
http://www.globalsecurity.org/

Institute for National Strategic Studies
http://www.ndu.edu/inss/

International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS)
https://www.iiss.org/

International Relations and Security Network (ISN)
http://www.isn.ethz.ch

International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN)
http://www.icanw.org/

National Institute for Public Policy (NIPP):
http://www.nipp.org

Natural Resources Defense Council:
http://www.nrdc.org/nuclear/nuguide/guinx.asp

Nuclear Age Peace Foundation
https://www.wagingpeace.org/

PIR Center (Moscow)
http://www.pircenter.org

Ploughshares Fund
http://ploughshares.org/

Physicians for Social Responsibility (Nuclear Weapons)
http://www.psr.org/nuclear-weapons/

Reaching Critical Will
http://www.reachingcriticalwill.org/

Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI)
http://www.sipri.se

Union of Concerned Scientists
http://www.ucsusa.org/nuclear-weapons

 

Blogs

Arms Control Wonk
http://armscontrolwonk.com/

Federation of American Scientists Strategic Security Blog
http://www.fas.org/blog/ssp/

Arms Control Now (Blog of Arms Control Association)
http://armscontrolnow.org/

 

 

 

 

Readings to Support Learning

2012-2013 Critical Issues Forum

Useful Resources

Topic: Toward a World without Nuclear Weapons: Progress, Prospects, and Challenges

Overview

  • Nuclear Disarmament Resource Collection

http://www.nti.org/analysis/reports/nuclear-disarmament/

  • Global Zero Interactive Map

http://www.globalzero.org/map

  • What is Nuclear?

www.whatisnuclear.com

  • How Nuclear Bombs Work

http://science.howstuffworks.com/nuclear-bomb.htm

  • How Stuff Works: Nuclear Weapons

http://science.howstuffworks.com/search.php?terms=nuclear+weapons

  • Disarmament: A Basic Guide

http://www.un.org/disarmament/HomePage/ODAPublications/AdhocPublications/PDF/Basic_Guide-2011-web-Rev1.pdf

  • The Nuclear Information Project

http://www.fas.org/programs/ssp/nukes/index.html

Country-specific Information

 

  • Arms Control Association

A web source on arms control containing issue briefs, fact sheets, threat assessment briefs, and current event reports. http://www.armscontrol.org

Fact Sheets: Country Profiles

United States-http://www.armscontrol.org/factsheets/unitedstatesprofile

Russia-http://www.armscontrol.org/factsheets/russiaprofile

France-http://www.armscontrol.org/factsheets/franceprofile

China-http://www.armscontrol.org/factsheets/chinaprofile

The United Kingdom-http://www.armscontrol.org/factsheets/ukprofile

Pakistan-http://www.armscontrol.org/factsheets/pakistanprofile

India-http://www.armscontrol.org/factsheets/indiaprofile

Israel-http://www.armscontrol.org/factsheets/israelprofile

North Korea-http://www.armscontrol.org/factsheets/northkoreaprofile

Iran-http://www.armscontrol.org/factsheets/iranprofile

  • PBS Newshour: Tracking Nuclear Weapons

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/indepth_coverage/military/proliferation/profiles.html

  • Nuclear Threat Initiative Country Profiles

http://www.nti.org/e_research/profiles/index.html

Government Resources

 

  • U.S. State Department

The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT)

History overview, treaty text, documents, statements and press releases.

http://www.state.gov/t/isn/npt/index.htm

New START Treaty
Resources with treaty text, statements, fact sheets, press releases, and a timeline.
http://www.state.gov/t/avc/newstart/index.htm

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION Resources/General Information on Nuclear Disarmament

 

  • United Nations

United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs (UNODA)

Main website for sources pertaining to disarmament containing spotlights on recent developments, updates and announcements.

http://www.un.org/disarmament/

United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research /Disarmament Forum

http://www.unidir.org/

Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT)

Text and documents from NPT and PrepCom Conferences.

http://www.un.org/disarmament/WMD/Nuclear/NPT_Review_Conferences.shtml

Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zones (NWFZ)

Treaties, guidelines and map of NWFZ.

http://www.un.org/disarmament/WMD/Nuclear/NWFZ.shtml

Applying a Disarmament Lens to Gender, Human Rights, Development, Security, Education and Communication: Six Essays

http://www.un.org/disarmament/HomePage/ODAPublications/CivilSocietyAndDisarmament/2012/NGO_pub_2012.pdf

  • International Atomic Energy Agency

http://www.iaea.org

IAEA Training Resources and Materials

Contains training services, tools, courses, fellowships and links to regional cooperation networks.

http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Training/index.html

  • Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization

Main website for treaty text and status, recent news, international monitoring system status, and updates.

http://www.ctbto.org

NGO/Research Institutes/Media

  • Acronym Institute for Disarmament Diplomacy

Contains news, research and analysis publications, and parliamentary records relating to peace, disarmament and human security.

http://www.acronym.org.uk

Country Profiles

An interactive map offering snapshots of the disarmament and nonproliferation commitments by each country.

http://www.acronym.org.uk/map

  • Arms Control Association

http://www.armscontrol.org/

  • Federation of American Scientists

Nuclear Information Project

http://www.fas.org/programs/ssp/nukes/index.html

  • Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

http://www.thebulletin.org

  • Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Nuclear Policy Program

http://www.carnegieendowment.org/topic/?fa=list&id=563

  • Institute for Science and International Security

A think tank providing analyses about science and policy issues affecting international security. Contains country specific satellite imagery analyses, historical overview of nuclear weapons programs worldwide and news publications.

http://isis-online.org

  • James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies

http://cns.miis.edu/

International Organization & Nonproliferation Programs Inventory

http://cns.miis.edu/inventory/index.htm

Nonproliferation Review

http://cns.miis.edu/npr/index.htm

WMD Junction

http://wmdjunction.com/index.htm

  • Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology Center for Arms Control, Energy and Environmental Studies

http://www.armscontrol.ru/

  • Nuclear Threat Initiative

Country Profiles

An overview of country’s nuclear, chemical biological and missile programs.

http://www.nti.org/country-profiles/

Nuclear Security Project

http://www.nuclearsecurityproject.org/site/c.mjJXJbMMIoE/b.3483737/k.4057/Nuclear_Security_Project_Home.htm

Treaties and Regimes

An overview on treaties, organizations, regimes relating to nuclear disarmament, arms control and nonproliferation.

http://www.nti.org/treaties-and-regimes/treaties/

  • Ploughshares Fund

World Nuclear Stockpile Report

http://www.ploughshares.org/world-nuclear-stockpile-report

What Nuclear Weapons Cost Us

http://www.ploughshares.org/what-nuclear-weapons-cost-us

  • Reaching Critical Will

Disarmament programme of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom covering multilateral disarmament meetings, carrying out research and analysis on disarmament, military spending and human security.

http://reachingcriticalwill.org

  • Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

http://www.sipri.org/

  • Union of Concerned Scientists

Citizens and scientists providing research on nuclear weapons and global security, missile defense, nuclear terrorism, and space weapons. http://www.ucsusa.org/global_security/nuclear_weapons/

  • Disarmament Forum
    Civil society and nuclear disarmament , 2010 No 4 United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research

http://unidir.org/bdd/fiche-periodique.php?ref_periodique=1020-7287-2010-46-en

  • Civil Society and Disarmament

http://www.un.org/disarmament/HomePage/ODAPublications/CivilSocietyAndDisarmament/2012/NGO_pub_2012.pdf

Future Challenges

  • Reaching Critical Will: Publications

http://www.reachingcriticalwill.org/resources/publications-and-research/publications

  • Reaching Critical Will: Delegitimisation of nuclear weapons

http://www.reachingcriticalwill.org/resources/fact-sheets/critical-issues/4584-delegitimisation-of-nuclear-weapons

NGO/Advocacy Groups

  • International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons

http://icanw.org

Learn Peace

Activity book for primary and secondary school students. Activities include mock UN debates, writing competitions, conducting opinion polls and role-playing a nuclear crisis.

http://icanw.org/learn_peace

Blogs

  • Arms Control Wonk

http://armscontrolwonk.com

  • FAS Strategic Security Blog

http://www.fas.org/blog/ssp/

  • Arms Control Now, Blog of the Arms Control Association

http://armscontrolnow.org/

  • Nukes of Hazard

http://nukesofhazardblog.com/

  • Russia’s nuclear weapons

http://russianforces.org/

Interactive Websites/Multi Media:

  • CTBT

Map of treaty status, the international monitoring system, and locations of nuclear explosions.

http://www.ctbto.org/map/

Compilation of videos regarding ending nuclear testing, the monitoring systems, inspections, and interviews with specialists and scientists.

http://www.ctbto.org/videos/

“1945-1998”

Bird’s eye view of nuclear explosions conducted in various parts o the globe.

http://www.ctbto.org/specials/1945-1998-by-isao-hashimoto/

  • WMD Awareness Programme

http://www.wmdawareness.org.uk/teachers/fun-and-games

http://www.wmdawareness.org.uk/teachers/lesson-plans

  • NukeTube

http://cns.miis.edu/multimedia/index.htm

  • Atomic Archive

http://www.atomicarchive.com/sciencemenu.shtml

Op-Eds, Analyses and other Publications

  • Critical Questions: Urgent Decisions for the Second Obama Administration, CNS experts propose nonproliferation and disarmament priorities

http://www.nti.org/analysis/articles/issues-obama-administration-its-second-term/

  • Schultz, George P., et. al, “Toward a Nuclear-Free World,” Wall Street Journal Op-Ed, (January 15, 2008).

http://www.nuclearsecurityproject.org/publications/toward-a-nuclear-free-world

  • Schultz, George P., William et. al, “A World Free of Nuclear Weapons,” Wall Street Journal Op-Ed, (January 4, 2007).

http://www.nuclearsecurityproject.org/publications/a-world-free-of-nuclear-weapons

  • Schultz, George P., William et. al, “Deterrence in the Age of Nuclear Proliferation,” Wall Street Journal Op-Ed, (March 7, 2011)

http://www.nuclearsecurityproject.org/publications/deterrence-in-the-age-of-nuclear-proliferation

  • Schultz, George P., William et. al, “How to Protect Our Nuclear Deterrent” Wall Street Journal Op-Ed, (Jan 20, 2010)

http://www.nuclearsecurityproject.org/publications/how-to-protect-our-nuclear-deterrent-012010

  • Jeffrey Lewis, “Bar Nunn,” The US and Russia never really cured their nuclear mistrust. And now it’s come back. Foreign Policy, Oct 17, 2012.

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2012/10/17/bar_nunn

  • Hurd, Douglas, et al, “Start Worrying and Learn to Ditch the Bomb,” The Times, (June 30, 2008).

http://www.pugwash.org/reports/nw/nuclear-weapons-free-statements/NWFW_statements_UK.htm

  • Gorbachev, Mikhail, “The Nuclear Threat,” Wall Street Journal Op-Ed, (January 31, 2007).

http://www.nuclearsecurityproject.org/uploads/File/TheNuclearThreat-Gorbachev-WSJ-013107.pdf

http://www.unidir.org/pdf/articles/pdf-art3085.pdf

  • Buck Rogers and the atomic education of America

http://thebulletin.org/web-edition/features/buck-rogers-and-the-atomic-education-of-america

Additional Advanced Resources

  • Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Abolishing Nuclear Weapons: A Debate

http://www.carnegieendowment.org/2009/02/13/abolishing-nuclear-weapons-debate/dty

Beyond Treaties: Immediate Steps to Reduce Nuclear Dangers http://www.carnegieendowment.org/2012/10/10/beyond-treaties-immediate-steps-to-reduce-nuclear-dangers/e08j

Deterrence During Disarmament: Deep Nuclear Reductions and International Security http://www.carnegieendowment.org/2011/03/14/deterrence-during-disarmament-deep-nuclear-reductions-and-international-security/14xx

Reducing the Role of Nuclear Weapons: What the NDPI Can Do http://carnegieendowment.org/2012/11/26/diminishing-role-of-nuclear-weapons-non-proliferation-and-disarmament-initiative-s-good-beginning/emyn#

  • Reaching Critical Will, “The 2010 NPT Action Plan Monitoring Report”

http://www.reachingcriticalwill.org/images/documents/Publications/2010-Action-Plan/RCW_Final_Report.pdf

Movies, Videos

  • Nuclear Tipping Point (2010)

A documentary tackling nuclear dangers and the ongoing work of four Cold Warriors and their vision of a world without nuclear weapons and the steps to get there. http://www.nucleartippingpoint.org/home.html

  • UN Educational Movies

Embrace! A world free of nuclear weapons

Short film tracing the history of nuclear weapons tests since 1945 and their devastating effects on the environment and human health.

http://www.un.org/disarmament/education/Movies/embrace/

Nuclear Weapons: and the Human Future – How you can make a difference

http://www.un.org/disarmament/education/Movies/nwhfuture/

CTBT: For a Safer and More Secure World

The film depict activities for the Preparatory Commission for the CTBTO in establishing a global verification regime to monitor compliance with the Treaty.

http://www.un.org/disarmament/education/Movies/ctbt/

  • 1945-1998″ by Isao Hashimoto

http://www.ctbto.org/specials/1945-1998-by-isao-hashimoto/

Japanese artist Isao Hashimoto has created a beautiful, undeniably scary time-lapse map of the 2053 nuclear explosions which have taken place between 1945 and 1998, beginning with the Manhattan Project’s “Trinity” test near Los Alamos and concluding with Pakistan’s nuclear tests in May of 1998. This leaves out North Korea’s two alleged nuclear tests in this past decade (the legitimacy of both of which is not 100% clear).

Each nation gets a blip and a flashing dot on the map whenever they detonate a nuclear weapon, with a running tally kept on the top and bottom bars of the screen. Hashimoto, who began the project in 2003, says that he created it with the goal of showing”the fear and folly of nuclear weapons.” It starts really slow — if you want to see real action, skip ahead to 1962 or so — but the buildup becomes overwhelming.

  • Barefoot Gen (1983)

A story about the effect of the atomic bomb on a boy’s life and the lives of the Japanese people.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0085218/

  • Dr. Strangelove (1964)

An insane general starts a process to nuclear holocaust that a war room of politicians and generals frantically try to stop.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0057012/

  • Last Best Chance (2005)

A docudrama that shows the threat posed by vulnerable nuclear weapons and materials around the world and underscores what the stakes are.

http://www.lastbestchance.org/

  • The Day After Trinity (1981)

The film tells the story of J. Robert Oppenheimer, the theoretical physicist who led the effort to build the first atomic bomb.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0080594/

  • White Light Black Rain: The Destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (2007)

An HBO documentary film featuring interviews with fourteen Japanese survivors and four Americans involved in the 1945 atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0911010/

Teachers Guides

  • UN Cyber SchoolBus

http://www.un.org/Pubs/CyberSchoolBus/dnp/sub2.asp?ipage=nuclearweapons

  • Nuclear Tipping Point, Teacher’s Guide, (Published 2011).

http://iis-db.stanford.edu/pubs/23071/NTP_TeacherGuide.pdf

  • PBS

Avoiding Armageddon

http://www.pbs.org/avoidingarmageddon/getInvolved/involved_02_01_lesson3.html

  • A World Without Weapons

http://www.unac.org/learn/wwwp/

  • Disarmament and Security Centre-Promoting Alternative Security

http://www.disarmsecure.org/Nuclear_Free_Nation_Teachers_Resources_v1.0_2009_April_26.pdf

  • The Choices Program: History and Current Issues for the Classroom

http://www.choices.edu/resources/detail.php?id=49

 

Tech Tools for CIF Projects

Prezi Presentation Tool

Prezi – is a great tool to create dynamic and beautiful presentation. you can use video, photo, text, tabs, and whatever else you feel would make your presentation a better story.

About Prezi

Prezi Tutorial

VoiceThread Presentation and Collaboration Tool

VoiceThread – is another tool that you can use to work together on your projects from anywhere in the world. You don’t have to be online at the same time as your teammates from Russia or the United States. VoiceThread allows you to contribute to your project anytime you have a minute. All you need to do is start your project and then anyone on your team can edit and contribute to it. Anyone of you can comment on the changes made by others using your computer’s microphone. Check out this video tutorial and let us know if you have any questions!

Google Docs

GoogleDoc – a very handy tool for your team to collect information, think, draw and write together. To use it (just like most of other tools), to use GoogleDoc you all need to have your google accounts set up. One of you can start a document and invite the rest to join in to work on your presentation, report, or whatever else you all decide to work on.

Google Docs lets you create, share, and collaborate on documents online. And it just got better with rebuilt editors for documents, spreadsheets, and drawings, designed to improve collaboration, increase speed, and create richer documents.

 

WordPress: Blogging and Websites

Easy tool for creating blogs and websites, as well as a content management system. Get students writing and creating visual displays of information, organize their information, and collaborate.

Wikispaces: Collaboration and Content Management

7 Things You Should Know About Wikis – EDUCAUSE.edu

Student Research and Projects

Critical Issues Forum, 2012-2013

 

For a PDF of this document, click here.

Student Research and Projects

Mini-Projects & Student Conference Presentation

This Year’s Topic: Toward a World without Nuclear Weapons: Progress, Prospects, and Challenges

The student work for this year’s CIF program is an accumulative (step-by-step) process of research followed by a student project demonstrating understanding of the research phase. The work is divided into three steps. Step 1 helps students understand the concrete, fundamental facts underlying nuclear weapons and basic theoretical concepts. Step 2 builds on the knowledge gained in Step 1 by guiding students through the progress toward nuclear disarmament and remaining political and technical challenges. Step 3 asks students to visualize their own solutions or scenarios for a world without nuclear weapons. The work for Step 3 will become the final student presentation for the Spring Student Conference. Careful strategic planning can allow student groups to choose an overall project theme for all three steps, leading to the final conference presentation.

In the research phase, participants will examine this topic in CIF’s four content domains: scientific/environmental, social/cultural, economic, and political /geopolitical.

Fact finding, state motivations and deterrence

Students will take stock of the current status of nuclear weapons worldwide, including the number of nuclear weapons (both deployed and non-deployed) in both NPT nuclear weapon states and non-NPT nuclear weapon states. They will study factual information such as the scientific aspects of nuclear weapons, including basic weapon types and design, and the effects of nuclear weapon use. Students will also examine the role of nuclear weapons during and after the Cold War and investigate why countries attempt to acquire nuclear weapons, the concept of deterrence, and various current and past efforts to reduce the threat of nuclear weapons, including multilateral, bilateral and unilateral initiatives.

Objectives of the Research Phase

In the research phase, participants will examine this topic in CIF’s four content domains: scientific/environmental, social/cultural, economic, and political /geopolitical. Students should be able to demonstrate a synthesis of knowledge gained in meeting the following objectives:

  1. To know the number of nuclear weapons in the world, who owns them, and what their status is—e.g., stockpiled or deployed, etc.
  2. To understand how nuclear weapons are designed, how they work, and what the effects are of their use. Effects include explosive effects as well as consequences of their use on people and the environment.
  3. To learn the role of nuclear weapons during the Cold War and the dynamics of deterrence.
  4. To analyze why some states pursue nuclear weapons and others do not, including those that give up nuclear weapons and/or the capability to develop them.

Suggested Areas for Research

These areas are provided to help students search for relevant information. Students and teachers are welcome to look beyond this list for information to support the learning objectives and/or the mini-project.

  • The countries that have, are developing, and are suspected of developing nuclear weapons
  • The scientific and technical hurdles to the development of nuclear weapons
  • The motivations for nuclear proliferation
  • Early efforts to control nuclear nonproliferation
  • The Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT)
  • Membership and growth
  • Objectives and key provisions
  • Verification and enforcement (IAEA safeguards and the UN Security Council Resolutions)
  • Reasons that some countries are not part of the NPT
  • Major Review Conferences
  • Which conferences succeeded and why.
  • Which did not succeed and why.
  • Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT): current status, prospects
  • Fissile Material (Cut-Off) Treaty (FM(C)T) negotiation: current status, prospects
  • Conference on Disarmament: roles, history, membership, current challenges
  • Nuclear Weapon Free Zones
  • US-Russia Bilateral arms control (SALT, INF, START, New START)

Mini-Project 1

The purpose of the first Mini-Project is to apply student learning of the research objectives for Step 1. While student groups should meet all four (4) objectives in the research phase of Step 1, the mini-project presentation should demonstrate understanding of at least two (2) objectives, combining concrete information with abstract concepts. For example, Objectives 1&2 address more concrete, quantitative information, while Objectives 3&4 address more abstract concepts.

Presentation

Mini-Projects should be carefully developed, with attention to presentation. Whether it is a research paper or a 3D model of a weapon design, each mini-project should include a narrative (in writing and/or voice) comprising:

  • The purposeof the project. Make a point! Think of this as the thesis of your story. Every good story has an introduction, plot, characters, setting, climax, and conclusion. What story do you want to tell?
  • A clear point of view. Where do you stand on the issue of disarmament and weapons reduction or elimination? This should be clear.
  • Clear and concise language. Language should be carefully chosen and terminology appropriately used.
  • Organization! Have a clear introduction that sets the tone for the narrative, a clear purpose, concrete support, and a logical conclusion.

The following are suggested forms that the Mini-Project could take. Student groups are welcome to propose their own ideas for the project. However, the project format must be able to be posted on the website.

  • Research paper
  • PowerPoint with voiceover or written narrative
  • Prezi with audio or written narrative
  • Illustrated poster with narrative
  • Video
  • Digital storytelling
  • Voicethread
  • Website or blog
  • 3-D Model with narration
  • Multimedia
  • Any combination of the above

The Mini-Project must meet the following criteria:

  • Be original student work
  • Should be a product of teamwork by all participating students
  • Demonstrate in-depth understanding of the chosen area of the topic
  • Be displayable on the CIF website
  • Include clear and accurate citations for any work borrowed from other sources
  • Be accompanied by a bibliography of works cited (if not a paper).

Identifying progress toward nuclear disarmament, as well as the remaining political and technical challenges

Students will investigate progress toward nuclear disarmament before and after the Cold War. Progress includes the reduction in the number of nuclear weapons from the height of the Cold War through the US-Russian bilateral arms control treaties, unilateral initiatives by some other nuclear weapon states, and disarmament initiatives by other countries as well as civil society. While the prospect of nuclear disarmament was bright when Obama made his Prague speech promising a world free of nuclear weapons, numerous challenges to progress on nuclear disarmament remain. The divisions between nuclear haves and have-nots with regard to treaty obligations are on full display. New proliferation threats have emerged, including enrichment and weapons development activities in Iran and North Korea, respectively; the possible acquisition of nuclear material or weapons by terrorist groups; and the potential modernization of arsenals in official nuclear weapons states.

Objectives of the Research Phase

In the research phase, participants will examine this topic in CIF’s four content domains: scientific/environmental, social/cultural, economic, and political /geopolitical. Students should be able to demonstrate a synthesis of knowledge gained in meeting the following objectives:

  1. To understand nuclear disarmament and progress made to reduce the number of nuclear weapons in the world, from the Cold War to the present.
  2. To understand various unilateral, bilateral and multilateral measures to control the numbers, use and proliferation of nuclear weapons.
  3. To analyze how US-Russian bilateral arms control treaties, unilateral initiatives by some other nuclear weapon states and disarmament initiatives by other countries work toward disarmament.
  4. To understand and evaluate the role of civil society in the work toward disarmament.
  5. To evaluate the challenges to nuclear disarmament, including how the dynamics between nuclear weapon states (NWS) and non-nuclear weapon states (NNWS) (the “haves” and “have-nots”), new proliferation threats, non-state actors, and weapons modernization affect progress on disarmament.

Suggested Areas for Research

These areas are provided to help students search for relevant information. Students and teachers are welcome to look beyond this list for information to support the learning objectives and/or the mini-project.

  • Obama administration nonproliferation policies
  • Obama Prague Speech
  • UN Security Council Resolution 1887
  • The “Reboot” of US-Russian relations
  • Initiatives for nuclear disarmament in other countries, civil society
  • Iran’s enrichment and missile programs
  • North Korea’s nuclear weapons and missile programs
  • Regional conflict and tension involving nuclear states
  • South Asia
  • Middle East
  • Northeast Asia
  • Terrorist groups and past nuclear- and radiological-related activities and intentions

Mini-Project 2

The purpose of Mini-Project 2 is to apply student learning of the research objectives for Step 2, building on students’ understanding of Step 1. Student groups should meet all five (5) objectives in the research phase of Step 2. In the Mini-Project, students should demonstrate synthesis of knowledge gained by interrelating chosen objectives in Steps 1&2, using concrete detail to support abstract concepts. For example, the project could demonstrate understanding of efforts made to control and/or reduce nuclear weapons (Objectives 1&2 of Step 2), supported by quantitative information about the numbers of nuclear weapons, who has them, and what their status is (Objective 1 of Step 1). Another example is to analyze the role of nuclear weapons today and motivations for states to acquire them (knowledge gained through Objectives 1-5 of Step 2) based on historical understanding of deterrence and the role of nuclear weapons in the Cold War (Objectives 3&4 of Step 1).

Presentation

Mini-Projects should be carefully developed, with attention to presentation. Whether it is a research paper or a 3D model of a weapon design, each mini-project should include a narrative (in writing and/or voice) comprising:

  • The purposeof the project. Make a point! Think of this as the thesis of your story. Every good story has an introduction, plot, characters, setting, climax, and conclusion. What story do you want to tell?
  • A clear point of view. Where do you stand on the issue of disarmament and weapons reduction or elimination? This should be clear.
  • Clear and concise language. Language should be carefully chosen and terminology appropriately used.
  • Organization! Have a clear introduction that sets the tone for the narrative, a clear purpose, concrete support, and a logical conclusion.

The following are suggested forms that the Mini-Project could take. Student groups are welcome to propose their own ideas for the project. However, the project format must be able to be posted on the website.

  • Research paper
  • PowerPoint with voiceover or written narrative
  • Prezi with audio or written narrative
  • Illustrated poster with narrative
  • Video
  • Digital storytelling
  • Voicethread
  • Website or blog
  • 3-D Model with narration
  • Multimedia
  • Any combination of the above

The Mini-Project must meet the following criteria:

  • Be original student work
  • Should be a product of teamwork by all participating students
  • Demonstrate in-depth understanding of the chosen area of the topic
  • Be displayable on the CIF website
  • Include clear and accurate citations for any work borrowed from other sources
  • Be accompanied by a bibliography of works cited (if not a paper).

STUDENT CONFERENCE PROJECT

 

Future Prospects: What should be done to free the world of nuclear weapons?

Students will explore the security benefits and possible risks of reducing or eliminating nuclear arsenals. What are the political and technical obstacles to achieving the goal of a world free of nuclear weapons?  Despite numerous challenges on the path toward a world free of nuclear weapons, many national governments and members of civil society have cooperated in initiatives to promote progress toward this goal.  CIF high school students, the next generation of leaders of nuclear disarmament, need to develop their own vision for a safer future world.

Objectives of the Research Phase

In the research phase, participants will examine this topic in CIF’s four content domains: scientific/environmental, social/cultural, economic, and political /geopolitical. Students should be able to demonstrate a synthesis of knowledge gained in meeting the following objectives:

  1. To analyze both the security benefits and risks of reducing or eliminating nuclear arsenals.
  2. To evaluate the political and technical obstacles to complete global disarmament.
  3. To investigate the factors involved in cooperative efforts by national governments and civil society to promote disarmament.
  4. To develop a vision for, pathway to, or solution for achieving a world without nuclear weapons.

FINAL CONFERENCE PRESENTATION: Your own roadmap to a world without nuclear weapons

Student groups who are participating in the 2013 CIF Spring Student Conference are required to make an oral presentation. The format and topic for this presentation are open, but must be approximately 20 minutes long plus 10 minutes for Q&A, include live speaking roles for students, and be relevant to the year’s topic theme. If students choose to extend their mini-projects for this conference presentation, the presentation should go beyond the scope and depth of the mini-project. Overall, the conference presentation should exceed scope and depth of the mini-projects.

The purpose of the Final Student Conference presentation is to apply student learning of the research objectives for Steps 1-3 to develop a vision, pathway, solution, or scenario for a world without nuclear weapons. While student groups do not need to demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of all the objectives in Steps 1-3, the conference presentation should reflect a synthesis of the knowledge gained in the research phase of all three steps.

To develop this project, students should expand their investigations to include (but not be limited to) the possibility of:

  • Going beyond the current Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty regime
  • Moving disarmament forward from the current US-Russia bilateral arms control to a global level
  • Delegitimizing nuclear weapons.

Conference Presentations should be carefully developed, with attention to appearance, staging, and production. Whether the student group performs a skit or makes a formal presentation, the same elements that applied to the Mini-Projects should be included in the Conference Presentation:

  • The purposeof the project. Make a point! Think of this as the thesis of your story. Every good story has an introduction, plot, characters, setting, climax, and conclusion. What story are you wanting to tell?
  • A clear point of view. Where do you stand on the issue of disarmament and weapons reduction or elimination? This should be clear.
  • Clear and concise language. Language should be carefully chosen and terminology appropriately used.
  • Organization! Have a clear introduction that sets the tone for the narrative, a clear purpose, concrete support, and a logical conclusion.

The following are suggested forms that the Student Conference Presentation could take. Student groups are welcome to propose their own ideas for the presentation to their teachers. All presentation forms should include live student speaking roles at the conference (i.e., Don’t rely only on video or only on a game or interactive activity with the audience. Follow guidelines above for the conference presentation.)

  • PowerPoint, Prezi or other Visual Presentation
  • Skit or play
  • Mini-simulation (role play)
  • Projects that can be projected (but should also include live student roles)
    • Video
    • Digital storytelling
    • Voicethread
    • Website or blog
    • 3-D Model with narration
    • Multimedia
  • Interactive activity with audience
  • Competition
  • Any combination of the above

The Student Conference Presentation must meet the following criteria:

  • Be original student work
  • Should be a product of teamwork by all participating students, including students who cannot come to the Spring Conference
  • Demonstrate in-depth understanding of the chosen area of the topic
  • Include clear and accurate citations for any work borrowed from other sources (as appropriate to the medium)
  • Be accompanied by a bibliography of works cited if no citations are included elsewhere
  • Meet professional standards of oral presentation (more instruction will be provided).

 

 

Critical Issues Forum Resources

(View Page in PDF)

ARTICLES & BOOKS

Nuclear Energy and Power

U.S. Government Organizations

Non-Government Organizations

IAEA

Nuclear Safety

IAEA Documents

Nuclear Security

UN High-level Meeting on Nuclear Safety and Security
(September 22, 2011)

Statements

Country Statements

NGO/Research Institute Analysis

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

Industry

The Fukushima Accident

Three Mile Island

Chernobyl

Video

ORGANIZATIONS

Groups against Nuclear Power

Groups In Support of Nuclear Power

ACTIVITY SUGGESTIONS

BBC Bitesize

MULTIMEDIA

VIDEO

The Legal Framework of Nuclear Safety and Security

Nuclear Safety

Nuclear Security

Relevant framework for both nuclear safety and nuclear security

CNS Staff, Lecturers and Consultants

CNS Staff, Lecturers and Consultants

CNS Staff/Lecturers

William Potter, Director

Patricia Lewis, Deputy Director

Avner Cohen, Education Program Director

Miles Pomper, Senior Research Associate

Ferenc Dalnoki-Veress, Scientist-in-Residence

Masako Toki, CNS Project Manager

Stephanie Lieggi, CNS Senior Research Associate

Lisa Sanders Luscombe, CNS Project Manager

Eduardo Fujii, Senior Programmer/Analyst

 

Consultants

Stephen Sesko, CIF Program Consultant

Sue Ann Dobbyn, CIF Program Consultant

 

CNS Students

Jerry Sergei Davydov, CNS Graduate Research Assistant

Yelena Altman, CNS Graduate Research Assistant

Michelle Olson, CNS Graduate Research Assistant

Sophie Manoukian, CNS Graduate Research Assistant

Karen Hogue, CNS Graduate Research Assistant

Steven Anderle, CNS Graduate Research Assistant

 

How to Conduct the CIF Project

Conducting the CIF Project

Interested teachers may begin the program in either semester, depending on the schedule of their school.

The CNS Education Group and experienced CIF teachers will be available to assist new participants. We will attempt to pair new teachers with experienced teachers. These people will help guide you through the following suggestions to implement the CIF program.

Every teacher has a particular style of instructing students. In keeping with the CIF curricular model, the coordinators and experienced CIF teachers suggest a constructivist approach. In this way students soon establish a baseline of what they already know. They also begin to understand what they do not know. Finally, they establish what they want to learn and where they must do research to learn these things.

The CIF staff suggests you and your students begin the course by brainstorming both the Benchmark statements and the objectives. In these sessions you might want to create concept maps to visually display connections and links between and among topics. In this way you and your students will develop the meaning of the issues.

Following this, you may want to divide the work among your students. Maybe you would like to create teams that will investigate different geographical regions. Perhaps certain activities would appeal more to some students than to others. Are there some who would like to do the scientific as opposed to the historical research? Are there students who have a knack for writing essays or reports? Do you have web whizzes who will assemble the Benchmark and final products?

Next, define vocabulary and terms. Try to identify terms that will most likely be seen as acronyms. If you find undefined acronyms, there are acronym dictionaries. Make lists of vocabulary and special terms. Perhaps you will want to create a glossary, maybe even one with illustrative pictures or graphics.

Define the areas where you need to do research and the kinds of research tools that you need to use. For example, you might need almanacs for economic statistics on particular countries. You might need atlases to investigate specific regions. The Web might be a good source for pictures and other graphics to illustrate your product. Some of the activities will require interviews with people in the community. You might even want to check out the local video rental. The school or local library could give you social and cultural background information. Your options are many and varied.

The CIF coordinators strongly recommend that you not get all of your data from the Internet. It has been said, “not everything on the Web is good, and not everything that is good is on the Web.”

Synthesize and analyze your data. One of the requirements for your Benchmark and final products is that you have internal source citations and a reference list or bibliography at the end.

For each Benchmark, the coordinators expect to receive results that demonstrate the students’ knowledge of the vocabulary, concepts, and issues covered by each Benchmark. Decide how you want to present your results. These results could be essays, reports, the script for a TV newscast, a newspaper article, a press release, an op-ed piece, or other written material. You might want to create a multimedia product, maybe in HyperStudio or some other software product. You might want to develop a series of Web pages. Again, your options are many and varied.

Throughout this process also think about the kind of presentation you would like to make at the student conference. In a conference situation your students will have the opportunity to interact with students from other states and other countries. Consider that this venue is quite different from that in which the Benchmark results are displayed. At the student conference there will be much more oral and visual interaction.

We welcome you to CIF and look forward to the work that your students produce. Please take advantage of this website, the threaded discussion on Yahoo, and the CIF staff and teachers.