Tuesday, June 2nd, 2015

MIIS Professors and Alumni Publish Book on Shanghai’s Pilot Free Trade Zone

China Cover 2.0

 

MIIS GSIPM professors Robert Rogowsky (trade and development) and Lijuan Zhang (economics), along with several MIIS students and alumni recently published an e- book titled China (Shanghai) Pilot Free Trade Zone: An Experiment in Economic Reform. The MIIS students and alumni involved in the project included:

Malori DiPierro,

Shuyi Deng

Jiao Xu

Oscar Grijalva

Haibin Ren

Sharon O’Kello

Yongbin Jiang

Mrinalini Patnaik

 

The book is a compilation of several student research projects that discusses the Shanghai Free Trade Zone (FTZ) in the context of economic reform in China. The FTZ represents a new era of trade and financial liberalization in China. Themes analyzed throughout the book include foreign banks, American life insurers, money laundering risks, business-government relations, intellectual property rights, the Shenzhen Special Economic Zone, and policy implications. The authors want to show how the new eleven-square-mile area will affect both local Chinese companies and multinational corporations business. A free download of the e-book is available here: HERE

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

DPMI Monterey Hosts Students and Professionals

DPMI Picture

For the past week and a half, 11 students and professionals have been participating in MIIS’s Design, Partnering, Management and Innovation program on the Middlebury Institute campus in Monterey. The program’s modules include designing and managing development projects, social entrepreneurship, strategic partnering, while facilitating participatory development. The program will continue until Friday, June 5. For more information about DPMI, see the program’s website at http://www.miis.edu/academics/short/development-management/curriculum .

Wednesday, May 13th, 2015

Directed by MIIS Professor and Alumna, Report on World’s Mothers Makes Headlines

Urban Disadvantage

Headed by Professor Beryl Levinger and MIIS alumna Nikki Gillete, along with Professor Fernando De Paolis and Sophie Dresser, MPA ’16, the 2015 Save the Children State of the World’s Mothers Report was recently released, concentrating on urban poverty and those affected by it in their everyday lives. Some of the statistics found in the research are unnerving. At the same time, the report also provides possible solutions for creating a better future for some of the world’s most impoverished, disadvantaged peoples.

_______________________________________________________________________

The 2015 Save the Children State of the World’s Mothers Report focuses on the “hidden and often neglected plight of the urban poor.” Its many findings have been featured by media around the world, reminding all of us of the true importance of Mother’s Day.

The report shows progress in reducing child death rates in many countries, but also growing disparities. Topping the list of best countries for mothers are Norway, Finland, Iceland, Denmark, and Sweden, with the United States in 33rd place. The ranking of countries, along with alarming statistics about cities in the United States that have some of the highest urban infant mortality rates among high-income countries, made for numerous media headlines in recent days. Washington D.C has by far the highest infant mortality rate among the 25 capital cities of wealthy OECD countries.

“The report, with its wide international audience, pinpoints where mothers and their children are especially at risk and what can be done to create a better future for the world’s most vulnerable populations,” says Professor Beryl Levinger, chair of the Institute’s Development, Practice and Policy program, who co-directed the research for the Report along with alumna Nikki Gillette BAIS ’06 MPA ’07 MBA ’08.

“I have worked closely with Beryl on the State of the World’s Mothers report for nine years now, first as a research assistant and then as research co-director,” shares Gillette. “I have Beryl to thank for the opportunity to do this good and meaningful work. She is brilliant and I have learned so much from her over the years, both personally and professionally.”

“There is nothing more exciting for me than bridging the worlds of academia, policy research and advocacy,” shares Professor Levinger, adding that for each of the last 15 State of the World’s Mothers reports, MIIS students, alumni, and occasionally faculty have contributed to this research. Working with Gillette and Levinger for the 2015 Report were Professor Fernando De Paolis and student Sophie Dresser MPA ’16.

Dresser says she had a great experience working with Gillette, that she found to be the perfect complement to the immersive learning opportunity she took advantage of with MIIS this January. “During DPMI Rwanda I was able to work with a public health-focused NGO and gain knowledge and insight into maternal child health issues globally, and in Rwanda specifically—skills that I built upon working on the State of the World’s Mothers report.”

Friday, May 8th, 2015

OpenIDEO – Accepting Ideas for Refugee Education Challenge

Refugee Education Challenge is now accepting ideas to improve education opportunities for children in refugee camps.

6dbcd758-ed87-49a5-ad9e-fa6bf0ea98bd

“Now is the chance to share an idea you have for how to improve education for refugees. We’ve partnered with UNCHR and UNICEF – so even if you aren’t able implement your idea yourself, there’s an opportunity you to submit a winning idea that could be implemented through partnerships with organizations already working with UNICEF and UNHCR.

Winning ideas on our shortlist will attend a design support bootcamp hosted by IDEO.org designers, where participants will learn how to apply human-centered design to their challenge idea. A handful of these ideas will be selected to receive a share of $500,000 in funding and design support.”

Design Principles for Refugee Education:

  • Focus on what we can do now
  • Design for gender equality
  • Keep resource limitations in mind
  • Design for uncertainty
  • Take an inclusive approach
  • Be culturally sensitive

Click to find out more about OpenIDEO and to submit an idea!

Monday, May 4th, 2015

Mark Your Calendars: East Asia Presentations this Thursday!

Presentations at Irvine Auditorium this Thursday, May 7th, 6:30-8:30pm, Reception 8:30-9:30pm!

east asia

The students that went on the first ever two-country program through MIIS Immersive Learning Programs, the East Asia: China and Japan trip, will be presenting this Thursday at Irvine, with a wine and hors d’oeuvres reception to follow. The presentations will be very interesting as this program included a semester long seminar which concluded in robust papers, and the feedback from the journey has been very interesting!

The East Asia Practicum was an investigative tour of Tokyo, Japan and Beijing, China, where participants met with and interviewed policymakers, former politicians, and renowned scholars. With unique research topics looking into the the international relations of the region, students were able to seek first-hand information on the dynamics of the two major players: Japan and China. The rise in status of either nation will set the political and economic tone for the region. By experiencing and researching within each nation, students will be able to provide original ideas on the current state of Sino-Japanese relations and the future of region.

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/466841256799447/

Friday, May 1st, 2015

DPMI FB

MAY 8 IS APPROACHING FAST!!

Earn a Professional Certificate in Project Design and Management

Now accepting applications for the Design, Partnering, Management & Innovation (DPMI) program!

The Middlebury Institute of International Studies in California is offering an intensive, 3-week training open to development professionals, career-changers, graduate students, and a limited number of gifted undergraduates. Design, Partnering, Management & Innovation (DPMI) is a professional certificate program for those seeking training for careers in humanitarian relief, emergency response, poverty alleviation, and long-term community development. The modules include (1) Managing Development Projects, (2) Strategic Partnership and Social Entrepreneurship, and (3) Social Change and Participatory Development. DPMI uses a cross-sector approach, taking best practices from the development field and combining these tools with successful concepts drawn from the private sector.

 

Now accepting applications for Summer 2015:

Monterey, CA

Dates: May 18-June 5, 2015
Application Deadline:
 May 8, 2015
Schedule:
 Monday-Friday
Hours:
 9:00 am – 5:30 pm (M, T, Th, F); 12:00pm-6pm (W)

 

Washington, D.C.

Dates: May 25-June 12, 2015
Application Deadline:
 May 8, 2015
Schedule:
 Monday-Friday
Hours:
 9:00 am – 5:30 pm (M, W, F); 12:00pm-6pm (Tues. and Thurs.)

 

Kenya

Dates: June 2-11, 2015
Application Deadline:
 May 8, 2015
Schedule:
 Monday-Friday

 

To apply or for more information, please visit http:go.miis.edu/dpmi or email dpmi@miis.edu

Monday, April 27th, 2015

Immersive Learners Champion Seven Countries through Nine Programs

I sat down with Maritza Munzón (MPA/IEM ’15), and Rafael Hernandez (MPA ’15) at a local coffee shop last week to interview them about MIIS’s Immersive Learning Programs. Maritza has traveled on five trips to six countries through MIIS (Peru, Cuba, Kenya, Mindanao, and East Asia), and Rafael has gone to four (Peru, Cuba, Rwanda, and East Asia). Both had a lot to say, much more than I can fit into this interview; I can’t encourage you enough to talk with your peers about their experiences abroad.

Q: What made you choose the immersive learning programs you chose?

Maritza: For me it’s always about “why not?” It is always a question of “if I don’t go, will I regret it?” And the answer is almost always “Yes”. So I do everything I can to take advantage of the opportunity to travel. MarRafFurthermore, because I am in the IEM degree program and want to conduct these trips myself one day, the best way to learn how to do this is to go on as many as I can!

Rafael: I was eager to begin traveling right away when I got here. That was the reason I picked this school over many other options – the traveling component. Right off the bat I could go on this Peru trip, that had a practical application of policy analysis, – and so I went.

M: I don’t think many people have traveled the way we travel here at MIIS.

There is only so much reading you can do about culture, practice, and so on, but you need to embed it in your muscle memory to learn and understand.

Q: Have you gone on any trips together?

Both went to Peru (but in different communities), as well as Cuba, and East Asia.

M: Peru started my obsession with these trips; the experience got my feet wet and then I wasn’t scared, anymore, to do the others.

Q: Are there any programs you especially wish you could have gone on?

R: I would have liked to go to the Philippines.

M: I would have done the El Salvador trip if I had the time. But I am always torn between what is familiar and what is less accessible. El Salvador is within my reach because of language, so I decided to take the leap and go on trips that I was less likely to do on my own:  Kenya, East Asia, and the Philippines.

Q: How did the programs and learning styles compare?

Both: Cuba was more like learning tourism, while Peru and East Asia where more research based: we did academic research in Asia, and field research in Peru.

M: I was a guinea pig for many of the trips – for example:  Kenya, Peru, and East Asia. Cuba was established. Being on a program in its first incarnation is a valuable experience for someone learning about how these programs are conducted.

R: I learned a lot about different types of intelligence and understanding. You know there is the computer competency type, where you either know it or you don’t. And if you don’t, you can ask help from someone who does – and there are no ego problems associated with that. Cultural competency, on the other hand, and especially at this school, is more complicated in that way. Then there is emotional intelligence (EQ) versus the IQ. When you go to speak to someone in a village, everyone on these trips is so concerned about being politically correct, which makes them all self-conscious. I found that the best way to take to people is honestly and openly.

Q: Since you have gone on so many of these programs, do you have any constructive feedback?

R: Like I said, these trips are one of the reasons why I chose this school. And we are so grateful for these experiences.

M: Growing up the way I did, I would have never been able to do this on my own. And I am grateful, and the best way I can give back is by applying my IEM knowledge and skills and giving constructive feedback. I was able to design a pre-departure training for the Peru trip, which was very well received, but not yet implemented. Based on our experience in Peru, Cortney Copeland and I designed a pre-departure workshop and assessment for that trip through our IEM Design and Assessment Class. In the workshop we wanted students to bond with the people in their groups, learn each other’s working styles and strength, while also getting to practice giving the surveys and entering the data. There are always hiccups with international travel and our goal was to develop cohesive groups before departure to help student better work through some of those unpredictable moments. The assessment consisted of a simple survey that students took before and after the trip to better inform staff and faculty of what is working and what needs improvement.

One of my frustrations with the organization of these trips is that the system that puts these trips together does not value the experience that the students going already have. Because the information isn’t coming from a respected magazine or periodical, but from the mouth of a student, who has had the personal experience or cultural experience growing up – but they didn’t write a paper on it, so…. We don’t get a diploma for growing up bilingual or for living similar lives to that of the people we are studying.

R: So if professors and institutions have a way, for better or worse, of validating those experiences, for example, “here is Maritza, she grew up in a culture that…..” and by doing that, it validates the person, and symbolically validates the peers that have experienced this. People come back like “I was shocked to see this and that”, and that is the only thing that gets the spotlight. But there are people who have lived this their whole lives.

M: Out of the bad comes the good. MIIS is proud of its international diversity on campus, but now there are also conversation on national diversity and socioeconomic diversity as well, which is something that came out of a critique on one of these trips. We go on these trips, and learn, and some things are difficult, but the important thing is to take the bad with the good and make something out of it. For some of us, that meant creating the Diversity and Inclusion Committee, which highlights domestic diversity on campus and is working on assessing the needs of all students, whether international students, first generation college students, student of color, LGBTQ, or second career seekers. We not only wanted to address diversity by identifying the needs of all students on campus but to make sure it is something that continues to be addressed in the institution after we are gone.

Professors should also make a point to make focus groups mandatory. A format of how to measure the trips as a whole, but also each trip individually, so it can be improved upon, but that responsibility also shouldn’t sit solely on the professor’s shoulders.

Q: Any advice for students who will travel on these programs in the future?

M: Some things you can’t prepare for. Keep an open mind, don’t sweat the small stuff. Like dirt, bugs-

R: – and cold showers –

M: – and so on because it distracts from the experience. Don’t fight the discomfort.

R: You don’t need language to communicate with people. You shouldn’t necessarily know a language perfectly – keep the willingness to go at the forefront. Don’t be catered to: we chose to go, to help. Be the one helping, not the helped. Own your decision to go.

Language should not be a barrier to communicating with people. In fact, I learned from my inability to speak the local language, which became a resource of information, connection, and interaction. When I ask you, “how do you say this?”, I become your student and switch the power dynamic. People love to teach you, to speak from authority. There is laughter, and it breaks the ice and opens new things. They think, “Here is a person who wants to know my language.” It helps equalizing the playing field.

Q: Is there something you never travel without?

M: I carry medicine for altitude sickness, headache, nausea, diarrhea, congestion, and allergies; but I also carry hydration salts and EmergenC to try and prevent getting sick as well. You never know how sick you are going to get and might not be able to get to a pharmacy right away or be able to communicate what you need so its good to carry some meds you trust. Oh! and Baby wipes.

R: Baby wipes! Pen and notepad.

*shows us his pen and notepad, which, sure enough, are in his back pocket*

M: That’s what I picked up, now I’ll do that.

R: I like to record sounds from the trips, it brings you back. *plays recording*

M: Learn how to say a greeting, and please and thank you in the local language.

R: So important!

____________________________________________________________

smaller headshotKatya Gamolsky (joint BA/MA ‘17) is a first year student who works for the Immersive Learning Programs Office. She recently went on the Los Angeles trip that focused on Homelessness, with Dr Iyer, and will be attending DPMI DC this summer. If you have any questions, comments, or would like to know more about our Immersive Learning Programs, please email her at immersive@miis.edu.

Friday, April 24th, 2015

IEM Practicum Symposium – Spring 2015

Capture

 

MIIS International Education Management

Cordially Invites You to Our

IEM Practicum
Symposium

Thursday, April 30, 2015

Please join us for a series of presentations
by our graduating IEM students on their practicum experiences.

There are two (2) sessions – please attend as you like!
See attached document for list of topics and presenters.

Session 1:  10am-12pm, McGowan 102
Session 2: 4pm-6pm, McGowan 100

or join us online at

go.miis.edu/iemsymsp15

Friday, April 17th, 2015

Cuba Presentations – Don’t Miss It!!

Cuban flag in Havana

Come check out the Cuba Presentations!! – DON’T MISS IT!

Location: MIIS – DLC

When: April 21, 2015

Time: 6pm-8pm

Friday, April 17th, 2015

DPMI Program Deadline for Monterey, Kenya & DC: May 8 – APPLY TODAY!

DPMI Summer

 

Earn a Professional Certificate in Project Design and Management

Now accepting applications for the Design, Partnering, Management & Innovation (DPMI) program!

The Middlebury Institute of International Studies in California is offering an intensive, 3-week training open to development professionals, career-changers, graduate students, and a limited number of gifted undergraduates. Design, Partnering, Management & Innovation (DPMI) is a professional certificate program for those seeking training for careers in humanitarian relief, emergency response, poverty alleviation, and long-term community development. The modules include (1) Managing Development Projects, (2) Strategic Partnership and Social Entrepreneurship, and (3) Social Change and Participatory Development. DPMI uses a cross-sector approach, taking best practices from the development field and combining these tools with successful concepts drawn from the private sector.

Now accepting applications for Summer 2015:

Monterey, CA

Dates: May 18-June 5, 2015
Application Deadline:
 April 1, 2015
Schedule:
 Monday-Friday
Hours:
 9:00 am – 5:30 pm (M, T, Th, F); 12:00pm-6pm (W)

 

Washington, D.C.

Dates: May 25-June 12, 2015
Application Deadline:
 April 1, 2015
Schedule:
 Monday-Friday
Hours:
 9:00 am – 5:30 pm (M, W, F); 12:00pm-6pm (Tues. and Thurs.)

 

Kenya

Dates: June 2-11, 2015
Application Deadline:
 April 1, 2015
Schedule:
 Monday-Friday

 

To apply or for more information, please visithttp:go.miis.edu/dpmi or email dpmi@miis.edu

Tuesday, April 14th, 2015

DPMI Deadline Extended to May 8!

DPMI Test

 

 

 

Earn a Professional Certificate in Project Design and Management

Now accepting applications for the Design, Partnering, Management & Innovation (DPMI) program!

The Middlebury Institute of International Studies in California is offering an intensive, 3-week training open to development professionals, career-changers, graduate students, and a limited number of gifted undergraduates. Design, Partnering, Management & Innovation (DPMI) is a professional certificate program for those seeking training for careers in humanitarian relief, emergency response, poverty alleviation, and long-term community development. The modules include (1) Managing Development Projects, (2) Strategic Partnership and Social Entrepreneurship, and (3) Social Change and Participatory Development. DPMI uses a cross-sector approach, taking best practices from the development field and combining these tools with successful concepts drawn from the private sector.

Now accepting applications for Summer 2015:

Monterey, CA

Dates: May 18-June 5, 2015
Application Deadline:
 April 1, 2015
Schedule:
 Monday-Friday
Hours:
 9:00 am – 5:30 pm (M, T, Th, F); 12:00pm-6pm (W)

 

Washington, D.C.

Dates: May 25-June 12, 2015
Application Deadline:
 April 1, 2015
Schedule:
 Monday-Friday
Hours:
 9:00 am – 5:30 pm (M, W, F); 12:00pm-6pm (Tues. and Thurs.)

 

Kenya

Dates: June 2-11, 2015
Application Deadline:
 April 1, 2015
Schedule:
 Monday-Friday

 

To apply or for more information, please visit http:go.miis.edu/dpmi or email dpmi@miis.edu

Tuesday, April 14th, 2015

Student Presentations for East Asia Trip

Thursday, May 7th 6:30-8:30pm

Venue to be announced

Come listen to students present on their Spring Break Immersive Trip to East Asia! They will cover topics including history and territorial disputes between Japan and China, nationalism, soft power, trade policies, international education policies in Japan and China, their roles in the Chiang Mai Initiative and emerging regional trade frameworks, and partnership with Brazil!

EastAsiaTrip

Tuesday, April 14th, 2015

IPSS Fellow Committed to Solid Waste Strategies

 

 

The SPREP team, Kelsey is featured on the far left.

The SPREP team, Kelsey is featured on the far left.

Current IPSS fellow Kelsey Richardson is taking part in a semester long IPSS fellowship with the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) in Apia, Samoa.  Kelsey was part of an initiative by the SPREP to review the Pacific Regional Solid Waste Strategy that ends in 2015 and develop a new, integrated Pacific Regional Waste Management and Pollution Control Strategy has been signed off between the Japan International Cooperation Agency and the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme.

Read more about the story here: http://www.sprep.org/waste-management-pollution-control/jica-sprep-renew-commitment-to-combat-waste-in-the-pacific

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, April 14th, 2015

Making Hay: The Future of U.S. Competitiveness in the Age of Globalization

San Jose, CA – April 30th, 2015

globalization-globe

“Join us for lunch and a one-of-a-kind, fast-paced, multi-media seminar on the history of global trade that will guide you though the seven decades-long odyssey that has come to be known as ‘globalization’. ‘Making Hay’ presents the convergence of historical events and undeniable factors that drove the U.S. to become a ‘Consumption Society’.

This seminar traces the process of global trade and globalization, as well as its impact on U.S. manufacturing and service industries. A careful examination of the past six decades reveals that global trade has had both positive and negative impacts on the U.S. economy, creating jobs in some areas while losing them in others.

‘Making Hay’ is presented by Dan Gardner, President and co-founder of Trade Facilitators, Inc. (TFI). An author of four books on global trade, Dan Gardner’s ‘Making Hay’ is one of the most interesting and entertaining seminars ever presented on global trade and should be a necessary requirement for professionals and students alike to experience.

The seminar concludes with a series of suggestions and interactive Q&A on how the U.S. can compete more effectively in the Age of Globalization.” – retrieved from flyer

WHERE: 

3 Flames Restaurant & Banquet

1547 Meridian Ave., San Jose, CA 95125

WHEN: April 30th, 2015; 11:30am; – Lunch: Noon-12:30pm; Conference: 12:30-2:30pm

Online Registration: $55 (including lunch) ; Deadline: April 29th, 5:00pm

@Door: $10 surcharge

Visit: http://www.mbita.org/events/makinghay.html for more information, Registration, & sponsorship opportunities!

Wednesday, April 8th, 2015

Team El Salvador 9 Presentation

Team El Salvador

Please join the members of Team El Salvador 9

in a presentation of their project work during J-Term 2015 in El Salvador

Thursday, April 16, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

Digital Learning Commons (DLC), MIIS

420 Calle Principal, Monterey

Come hear about innovative collaborations in coastal resource management, sustainable fishing, public space design for community empowerment… and plans for future initiatives!

~Light refreshments will be served~

To RSVP and for more information, please contact:  anegro@miis.edu

 

Friday, April 3rd, 2015

News about the East Asia Spring Break Journey!

 

 

News from the participants and professors was posted on the miis.edu front page.east asia

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

Update on the Sarah Meek Travel Grant for Work in Africa

Summer and Fall Applications Invited
Apply your skills and knowledge in the field

What: $1,500 travel grant for work or research in Africa

Requirements:
1.) Complete a research or professional project benefiting a social change organization in Africa for a minimum of two months. This project can be part of an internship or job.

2.) Develop a narrated photo slideshow or video documenting the knowledge gained from your experience.

Application Process:

1.) Submit a 1-2 page proposal outlining the following by April 8:

a. Project Beneficiary
b. Project Context/Background
c. Project Goal and Objectives
d. Deliverable Format

2.) Awards will be given based on the clarity, feasibility and relevance of the project to social change in Africa. Applicants will be notified by April 24.

3.) Awards will be given as reimbursement for travel to Africa.

Other Considerations: You may still apply if you do not have a confirmed internship. Only enrolled students may receive a travel grant. If two students will be conducting the research together, the award will be split between the two students with a cap of $1500 per award. Travel grants can be awarded in good faith before deliverables are complete.

If you have any questions or wish to discuss the eligibility of your planned project for this award, please make an appointment with Professor Ed Laurance at elaurance@miis.edu. He can also be reached at 831-402-2631.

These awards are made possible by a continuing donation from the family of Sarah Meek, a MIIS alum of 1996 whose life was cut short while working to improve social conditions in Africa.

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

MIIS Faculty – Jeffrey Lewis – Interview on Iran Nuclear Negotiations

jeffrey_lewisMIIS Faculty, Dr. Jeffrey Lewis, recently had an interview with Max Fisher of Vox on – “What everyone gets wrong about Iran nuclear negotiations.”

He touches on a variety of topics including safeguards, dual use goods, the NPT, automatic enforcement mechanisms, breakout calculations, uranium stockpiles, and much more!

Excerpt from the interview:

We have this crazy situation right now where the IAEA has basically no access to the places where the centrifuges are made. And so Iranian put those centrifuges on a truck, and if they drive them to [a publicly declared nuclear site such as] Natanz and install them there, then they’re safeguarded. But, if they, you know, drive them to some hole in a mountain then, no, they’re not safeguarded, we don’t see them.”  – Dr. Lewis

To read the full article and interview, follow this link: What everyone gets wrong about Iran nuclear negotiations

Dr. Lewis is the Director of the East Asia Nonproliferation Program at MIIS.

Click to check out Jeffrey Lewis’s MIIS Faculty Profile

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

Les Zambo Scholarship Fund

The Fisher International MBA Program invites applicants for the 2015-2016 Les Zambo Scholarship Program. Zambo Scholars will receive a grant of up to $10,000 towards tuition for MBA studies. Award may be applied to Summer 2015, Fall 2015 or Spring 2016 semesters.

Selection Criteria: Applicants must:
• Be full-time degree candidates in the MBA program.
• Have completed at least one full-time semester of graduate work in the Fisher International MBA.
• Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0.
• Be in residence during the Summer 2015, Fall 2015 or Spring 2016 academic term.

Application Process
• Submission of attached application form.
• Submission of a 500 word personal statement attesting to scholarly achievement, talent, leadership qualities, character, interpersonal skills, intellectual curiosity, description of service to the Fisher MBA and the Middlebury Institute, demonstrated collegiality with MBA program, staff and faculty, and community involvement. Statement should also articulate future career aspirations of the applicant and their commitment to the field.
• Submission of a resume.
• Submission of unofficial transcript.
• Submit all of the above with the following form by Wednesday, April 22nd.

Click to view the Full Guidelines of the Application and the Application Form  

Apply by Wednesday, April 22nd, to: Les Zambo Scholarship Fund, Fisher International MBA Program. Submit your application electronically to Toni M. Thomas, Assistant Dean, GSIPM, at: toni.thomas@miis.edu

Check out the Les Zambo Scholarship Fund Page to find out more about it and past scholars!

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

Team El Salvador Looking for a Team Leader!

Students from all MIIS Programs are encouraged to Apply!

TES Leader

TES Leader 2

 Description of Responsibilities 

TES Leader 5

Leadership term lasts early May 2015 to early May 2016

For more information check out the Team El Salvador Blog or email any questions to teamelsalvadormiis@gmail !

Send Resume & Cover Letter to teamelsalvadormiis@gmail.com by Sunday, April 14th!

 

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