Tag Archives: education

Alumni in India


Jeff Fowler (MA TESOL ’12) and Kimby Murakami (MA TESOL ’12) travelled to India to work for fellow MIIS Alum Tarana Patel’s (MA TESOL ’06) education organization, LearnEd, at Sankalchand Patel Colleges in Visnagar. They each taught two classes in the intensive English program at the college. In addition, the duo collaborated to present English for specific purposes (ESP) courses to engineering faculty.

Fowler taught English to undergraduate students with high-beginner to low-intermediate proficiency majoring in Computer Application, Business Administration, and Natural Sciences. Murakami taught undergraduate and graduate students with intermediate to advanced English proficiency majoring in Dentistry, Pharmacology, Engineering, and Computer Application. Each course incorporated a community outreach component chosen by the students. In team of two to three, students taught a 45-minute lesson to students in grades 1 through 5.

Fowler and Murakami reported that the students were enthusiastic to practice English and to share their culture with the foreign teachers. Both teachers enjoyed participating in Indian festivals (e.g., Kite Festival, Festival of Colors), exploring the ancient buildings in nearby towns, and sampling the culinary delights available in India.

Murakami heads back to India this month with MIIS alum Angie Petinos (MA TESOL ’12) to work in a 6-month teacher training program offered by LearnEd at Divine Child International School.

Shirley Brice Heath Visit: Friday, March 19 @ 2

Who: All Students
What: Visiting scholar, Shirley Brice Heath, shares her recent research
When: Friday, March 19, 2010 at 2:00 pm
Where: MG 100, Monterey Institute of International Studies

Moving the human eye and mind: Visual, musical and literary arts in grounding cognition

Shriley Brice Heath

Shirley Brice Heath

Economically advanced nations currently reflect a curious twist in reasoning. In spite of strong historical support for parallel economic and aesthetic development in the history of modern Western nations, education systems in many nations today are reducing art, music, and literature in their curricula. Teachers of the humanities and arts hold less prestige than their counterparts in the sciences and mathematics. The inextricable links between the development of science and advances in aesthetic creativity go unnoticed in current arguments for denying opportunities to learn creativity, work across media and modes, and develop expertise in visual perception and renderings of imagination in sketches, drawings, and models. Technological advances make imperative the “reading,” embodying, and creating of images to such an extent that neuroscientists now see these ways of learning as grounding cognition. This lecture considers these research findings in terms of implications for human learning across the life span.