Tag Archives: GSTILE

MIIS Faculty Lisa Donohoe published

MIIS Faculty Lisa Donohoe Luscombe has recently been published. The article is called Language and identity in a post-Soviet world: language of education and linguistic identity among Azerbaijani students. 

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Lisa’s article was published by the journal, Nationalities Paper: The Journal of Nationalism and Ethnicity, and can be found at this link: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/.VADD89JdXcg#.VADH8tJdXcg

Congratulations Lisa!

Professor Kavenoki Speaks at T&I Conference in Russia

Professor Kavenoki spoke on June 3, 2013 at the 5th Industry of Translation and Interpretation International Conference in Perm, Russia on the T&I Market in the United States, Russia, and Other Geographic Locations in the Russian-English Combination. The conference was held at the National Research Polytechnic University.

She also gave an open lecture on June 5, 2013. The topic of this lecture was the training of T&I Professionals in the United States.

To view an article about the conference (in Russian), please click here.

Spring Speaker Series starts off strong!

Barbara Sawhill gave an engaging two-hour interactive talk last Friday to TESOL/TFL students on the importance of renouncing a “multi-paged, intricately detailed, iron-clad syllabus” and replacing it with a student-centered, participatory class outline with collaborated class goals between the students and teacher. Barbara teaches Spanish at Oberlin College and is the Director of the Cooper International Language Center.

photo from: cogdogblog

Barbara renounces the old Factory Model of Education, which in her opinion lacks a context for students’ learning. This “Fordist” classoom is out of touch with the world around it and sees students as empty vessels who simply absorb and memorize, rather than experience and create.

As an educator, Barbara sees her job as “making this experience [in the classroom] as meaningful for you [the student] as possible”. She insists that as educators, we need to listen and model for students what we expect of them. As learners, we don’t need to simply find all of the answers, but learn how to create “really well-rounded, thoughtful questions”.

Four questions that Barbara asks her students at the beginning of each term are:

How do you learn?

Why are you here?

What do you want to learn?

How can we help you get there?

You can check out her work and ideas at  http://languages.oberlin.edu/lab-info/center-staff/ and http://languagelabunleashed.org/ and typical posts like http://languagelabunleashed.org/2010/03/15/the-backwards-syllabus/ Barbara introduces herself at http://vimeo.com/19050537 .You can read about her Spanish class at http://languages.oberlin.edu/courses/2010/spring/hisp205/ and http://languagelabunleashed.org/tag/hisp205/

Marciel Santos will be the next speaker this Spring, He will be talking on April 14 from 3-5 pm. Stay aware of fliers around campus for more information!

MIIS GSTILE Students Prepare for Peace Corps Assignments

The Monterey Institute of International Studies ranks fourth for the number of students participating in a Peace Corps Master’s International Program in 2010. The following GSTILE students are among those preparing to continue this tradition of service:

joseph clarkJoseph Clark
TESOL
Peace Corps Armenia: Secondary English Education
Enters Service: May 27, 2010
I was very attracted to the Peace Corps, specifically to the Master’s International Program where I was able to combine a graduate degree with Peace Corps Service. With a year spent studying how to teach English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) I feel much more prepared for my Peace Corps assignment and able to serve as a volunteer.

Rebecca Clayton
TESOL
Peace Corps South Africa: Schools and Community Resource Project
Enters Service: July 12, 2010
In serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer, my love of adventure meets my calling as a teacher. As an ambassador for the US, I hope to strengthen South Africa’s education system and learn from its people.

Brittni DriverBrittni Driver PCMI
TESOL
Peace Corps Malawi: Teacher Development Facilitator
Enters Service July 1, 2010
I am passionate about serving in the Peace Corps not only because I want to broaden my own understanding of other cultures, but also because I want to inspire other Americans to go beyond themselves through service. By combining the Peace Corps with a Master’s Degree in the Peace Corps Master’s International program I have gained the skills, knowledge, and confidence to be the best volunteer I can be.

monica schneiderman

Monica Schneiderman
TESOL
Peace Corps Nicaragua: Language Teacher and Trainer
Enters Service: August 31st, 2010
Motivation: The Peace Corps Master’s International program is an excellent opportunity for me to serve others around the world using the skills I have and in the career I wish to pursue post graduation. I believe PCMI will be both personally and professionally rewarding and therefore I couldn’t have asked for a more perfect match!

Sky Lantz‐Wagnersky lantz wagner
TESOL
Peace Corps China: Teacher Trainer
Enters Service: June 29, 2010
MOTIVATION: The desire to serve my country, promote peace and understanding, and have a new adventure.

Faculty Publications: Professor Leo van Lier

Too often, the needs of English language learners are met with simplified curriculum and lowered expectations. What would happen if instead classrooms were organized to honor the promise of these students by increasing rather than decreasing the intellectual challenge of instruction, by increasing the support such challenge requires, and by increasing students’ active engagement with their own learning?

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This book is the result of a decade-long effort in school districts to implement challenging instruction that is designed for classrooms that include English learners and that raises the bar and increases engagement for all learners.

Classroom vignettes, transcripts of student interactions, and detailed examples of intellectually engaging middle school and high school lessons provide a concrete picture of the instructional approach developed by coauthor Aída Walqui, founder and director of WestEd s Quality Teaching for English Learners (QTEL) initiative.

Underlying the QTEL approach and giving it coherence and power are three strands of instructional theory – cognitive psychology, sociolinguistics, and sociocultural learning theory. Coauthor Leo van Lier, internationally recognized author, linguist, and sociocultural theorist, lays out through clear and frequently wry examples just what these theories have to offer the classroom teacher, in particular the teacher of English learners.

7th Mini-Monterey Model Event

Mry Model screen shot

The Monterey Institute is  renowned for our special Monterey Model courses, which are taught simultaneously in multiple language sections. The Language Studies program offers professionally-relevant language courses for our students pursuing degrees in policy and business. These sections may focus on a topic such as Challenges of Globalization, Issues in the European Union, or Green Business (to name just a few), which each group explores from their own language and cultural perspective during the semester.  These language courses, some of which are offered in our Monterey Model format, provide opportunities for our students to enhance their language skills while exploring topics relevant to their degrees. At one or two points during the semester, all languages meet in plenary sessions (interpreted by students in our Conference Interpretation program) to share their findings.

Professor Jinhuei Enya Dai, Professor Vicki Porras and Professor Jacolyn Harmer initiated the 1st Mini-Monterey Model Event back in the Spring semester of 2007, which was entitled “Business Culture Presentation” presemted in Spanish and in Chinese, and collaborated with the Translation and Interpretation Program.  Later Japanese Professor Naoko Matsuo and Spanish Professor Pablo Oliva also joined the Mini-Monterey Model events in 2009.  Currently, as of  Spring 2010, we are celebrating  the 7th Mini-Monterey Model Semester.

MIIS alumni and former advancement fellow, Rajeev Rao (Chinese  Studies, MBA and IPS joint degree), commented on the Monterey Model’s

tremendous value of enhancing language learning at the institute and to academic life at MIIS.

monterey model

The 7th Mini-Monterey Model, held on April 23th, 2010, was a collaboration between the Translation and Interpretation Program, the Chinese Studies Program and the Spanish Studies Program.  The topics ranged from China Nuclear Doctrine, Provincial Reconstruction Team, Renewable Energy, Waste Management, to Chinese Pedagogical Grammar. This Model provides and enhances learning opportunities for T & I students and Language Studies students from different majors and expertise. It also showcases the outcomes of MIIS’s signature pedagogy in Language Studies Program: Content-based Instruction and Individualization.  We will continue celebrating Mini-Monterey Model and hope you can join us soon!

Conference Terminology and Procedures Workshop Well-Received

Thirty-three students participated in Conference Terminology and Procedures, a three-day workshop (March 5-7th 2010) giving students both an insider’s view on how an international organization such as the  United Nations navigates negotiations, discussions, debates and decisions, and providing basic materials on how to conduct and participate in meetings at a wide variety of organizations.

Students primarily from the Spanish, Chinese and Russian TI programs, as well as a Japanese TI and an IPS representative and two members of the public were most enthusiastic participants, and seemed to be having a very good time while absorbing large quantities of information.  Prior to the course they had received e-files of background and vocabulary material which reinforced the terminology and procedure lectures, and each received a thick course reader which will be of use to them in the future. The public participants in the course (a conference interpreting student from PUC, Brazil and an Arabic/English translation professional from the Bay Area) made valuable contributions.

The lecture sections of the course dealt with basic parliamentary procedure, the terminology for proceeding with agenda items, the structure of resolutions and other documents, and basic negotiating techniques.  Following the lecture section of the course the students were divided into three groups, with the task of taking three completely opposed positions on an issue of great concern to the students.

Despite the time pressures, the students seem to have successfully grasped the principles of drafting a resolution and of negotiating to consensus.

Dean Renee Jourdenais was pleased to have Dr. Lynn Visson join us to teach this workshop for the fourth year in a row, this year launching the Dean’s Lecture Series program.  Dr. Visson’s vibrant personality, humorous stories from inside the UN where she served as a staff interpreter in the English booth for French and Russian for more than twenty years, and her thorough knowledge of complex procedures make the class enjoyable and informative each year.  Dr. Visson received her Ph.D. from Harvard University, taught Russian language and literature at Columbia University, and is currently a member of the editorial board of Mosty, a Moscow-based journal on translation and interpretation, and a consulting editor of Hippocrene Books, NY.    Of Russian background, she is the author of many works on interpretation, translation, Russian-American marriages and various aspects of Russian culture, which have been published in both the US and Russia.

Thank you to Dr. Visson and students for making this workshop a success!

Faculty Update: Professor John Hedgcock

John Hedgcock’s recent professional activities include the completion of Teaching Readers of English: Students, Texts, and Contexts, co-authored with Dana Ferris and published by Routledge in March 2009. John and his co-author were honored to receive the 2009 David E. Eskey Award for Curricular Innovation as a result of this publication. John pursued his interest in L2 literacy education by presenting on that topic at the 2009 TESOL Convention in Denver and by co-teaching a course on ESL/EFL reading instruction at American University in July.

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In addition, he co-presented on his ongoing heritage language research at the American Association for Applied Linguistics meeting in Denver. With co-author Natalie Lefkowitz, he completed a chapter on academic literacy development among heritage students, to be published in the forthcoming volume, Learning to Write and Writing to Learn in an Additional Language, edited by Rosa Manchón. John’s chapter on theory and practice in L2 writing instruction also recently appeared in Practicing Theory in Second Language Writing, edited by Paul Matsuda and Tony Silva. Having completed his final year as member of the TOEFL Committee of Examiners, John continues to serve on the Editorial Advisory Board of TESOL Quarterly.

Issues In Re-Translation: The Case of Celestina by Peter Bush

On April 1, 2010, Peter Bush, an award-winning literary translator living in Barcelona, discussed his new translation of Fernando de Rojas’s Renaissance masterpiece, Celestina. This translation re-asserts Celestina‘s power as a pioneering work of fiction, written over five hundred years ago in a language and mood that is thoroughly contemporary. De Rojas’s original mix of street wit, obscenity and cultured rhetoric mark Celestina as one of the first prose masterpieces of European literature and a work of art to rival Cervantes, Velázquez and Goya. In his talk, Bush examined the tradition of translating this classic and discussed the strategy informing his decision to dispense with the dramatic structure imposed by de Rojas’s original publishers at the end of the fifteenth century. He compared different versions of a specific extract in English and French to facilitate a critical exchange on the theory and practice of translation.

Peter Bush studied French and Spanish at Cambridge and researched Spanish fiction and history in Oxford. He was Professor of Literary Translation at Middesex University and at the University of East Anglia where he also directed the British Centre for Literary Translation. Recent projects include Juan Goytisolo’s Juan the Landless, Valle-Inclán’s Tirano Banderas and Najat El Hachmi’s The Last Patriarch. He edited The Translator as Writer (with Susan Basnett), a collection of essays by leading translators on the art of literary translation.

     Celestina by Fernando de Rojas, introduction by Juan Goytisolo, with an after word by translator, Peter Bush. Published by Dedalus Books (June 2009) and Penguin Classics USA (January 2010)

Celestina by Fernando de Rojas, introduction by Juan Goytisolo, with an after word by translator, Peter Bush. Published by Dedalus Books (June 2009) and Penguin Classics USA (January 2010)

Fernando de Rojas was born in La Puebla de Montalbán in the early 1470s into a family whose Jewish forebears had been forced to convert to Christianity.