Tag Archives: research

TESOL Travel Grants

One more benefit to being a TESOL International Association member:

Did you know that the TESOL  International Association offers two awards that are specifically for graduate students? You are invited to apply! The recipient gets a stipend and free convention registration.

The Marckwardt Travel Grants assist graduate students traveling to a TESOL convention. The grants include $500 and free convention registration. All TESOL members who are graduate students in TESOL/TFL programs worldwide are eligible to apply.

The Ruth Crymes Fellowship supports recent or current graduate students who are developing projects with direct application to ESOL language classroom instruction. The recipient receives $1,500 and free convention registration for a subsequent year, when the project is presented. All TESOL members who are or have been enrolled within the past year in a TESOL or TEFL graduate program that prepares teachers to teach ESOL are eligible to apply for this fellowship.
For more information about eligibility and other TESOL awards, please go to the TESOL Awards and Grants Web page or contact awards@tesol.org.

Deadline: November 1, 2011

Shirley Brice Heath Visit: Friday, March 19 @ 2

Who: All Students
What: Visiting scholar, Shirley Brice Heath, shares her recent research
When: Friday, March 19, 2010 at 2:00 pm
Where: MG 100, Monterey Institute of International Studies

Moving the human eye and mind: Visual, musical and literary arts in grounding cognition

Shriley Brice Heath

Shirley Brice Heath

Economically advanced nations currently reflect a curious twist in reasoning. In spite of strong historical support for parallel economic and aesthetic development in the history of modern Western nations, education systems in many nations today are reducing art, music, and literature in their curricula. Teachers of the humanities and arts hold less prestige than their counterparts in the sciences and mathematics. The inextricable links between the development of science and advances in aesthetic creativity go unnoticed in current arguments for denying opportunities to learn creativity, work across media and modes, and develop expertise in visual perception and renderings of imagination in sketches, drawings, and models. Technological advances make imperative the “reading,” embodying, and creating of images to such an extent that neuroscientists now see these ways of learning as grounding cognition. This lecture considers these research findings in terms of implications for human learning across the life span.

Alum to be published in CATESOL Journal

MIIS TESOL alumna Janine Poreba recently received news that her Applied Linguistics Research (ALR) project will be published in the Winter 2010 issue of the CATESOL Journal.  She writes,



Recently, I dusted off my ALR project (“Negotiation Strategies in Two-Way Conversation Partnerships: Their Use and Usefulness”) and re-read it. I’m working at Santa Monica College, and some colleagues and I are starting a Conversation Exchange Program here, so I wanted to see if I’d uncovered any useful information back in my grad school days. Sure enough, I had, and what’s more, the paper was still interesting to read. I made some changes and submitted it to the CATESOL Journal, and I just found out that it’ll be published in their Winter 2010 issue.

Congratulations, Janine!  And thanks to Kathi Bailey for passing along the news.