Tag Archives: Translation

TEDx Monterey: More Than Words

Professor Barry Olsen and Professor Laura Burian demonstrate the power of human cognition as they explain the subtle but important differences between professional translators and interpreters with assistance from Miguel Garcia (French), Weihao Zhang (Chinese) and Beatriz Rodriguez (Spanish). Click here to watch the video clip. 

Professor Kavenoki Speaks at T&I Conference in Russia

Professor Kavenoki spoke on June 3, 2013 at the 5th Industry of Translation and Interpretation International Conference in Perm, Russia on the T&I Market in the United States, Russia, and Other Geographic Locations in the Russian-English Combination. The conference was held at the National Research Polytechnic University.

She also gave an open lecture on June 5, 2013. The topic of this lecture was the training of T&I Professionals in the United States.

To view an article about the conference (in Russian), please click here.

Professor John Balcom Spoke at Bernard College

John Balcom (Professor, Chinese T&I) was invited to speak at a conference titled “Pedagogies of Translation: Current methods and Future Prospects,” which was held on May 4–5 at Barnard College in New York. The conference was organized by two professors at Barnard College, Lawrence Venuti and Peter O’Connor . The conference, which was hosted by the Center for Translation Studies at Barnard, brought scholars together from the U.S., Canada, and Europe.  Professors from translator training programs, translation studies programs, creative writing programs, and comparative literature programs discussed various pedagogical issues and compared notes on translation as it is taught in North America.  Professor Balcom participated in a panel discussion on translation in translator training programs.

Cyril Flerov Lectured at the Annual Conference of the California Federation of Interpreters

Cyril Flerov delivered a lecture on Advanced Simultaneous Interpretation Skills at the annual conference of the California Federation of Interpreters in San Francisco on October 23rd

Topics covered semantic text analysis, transformations, monitoring own interpretation, quality controls, mental preparation, semantic peaks, stage fright, voice training, “burnout”, among many others. The goal was to provide a road map for practicing interpreters for skill improvement.

He received positive feedback from those who attended

Professor Holly Mikkelson honored by ATA

Professor Mikkelson

This morning in Boston, Professor Holly Mikkelson was honored by the American Translators Association with the prestigious Alexander Gode Medal. The Alexander Gode Medal, as stated on the ATA website, is “ATA’s most prestigious award, is presented to an individual or institution for outstanding service to the translation and interpreting professions.” The award can be given out annually, with last year’s recipient being Glenn Nordin.

The Institute, and particularly those in GSTILE, would like to extend their warmest congratulations to Professor Mikkelson on this amazing accomplishment.

Found in Translation series: Now available online

Can’t find time in your busy schedule to attend the Institute’s Found in Translation series? The Monterey Institute is now posting videos of recorded events on the Found in Translation website, free of charge for everyone to watch.

This semester we’ve already had Professor Julie Johnson speak on mental conditioning for interpreters, and Kent Johansson speak about translating in the Eurpoean parliament. Both talks are up on the Found in Translation website now.

On November 1, Professor Aida Martinez-Gomez will be giving a presentation entitled “Community interpreting for less visible communities: An international overview of interpreting in prison settings” at 12:15PM in Irvine Auditorium. We look forward to seeing you all there. If not, be sure to catch the recording online.

Winter Break Updates

The wonderful professors in the MIIS Graduate School of Translation, Interpretation, and Language Education are frequently attending seminars and workshops related to their field around the world, and this winter has been no exception.

Wallace Chen, Assistant Professor and Chinese Translation and Interpretation Coordinator, has been very busy this season. He gave a keynote speech at the 15th International Conference on Teaching Translation and Interpretation, held at Chang Jung Christian University in Tainan, Taiwan on Dec. 17 2010. The topic was “Using Corpora in Teaching Translation and Interpretation.” He has also recently given a workshop to undergraduate students of translation and interpretation at National Taiwan University in Taipei, Taiwan. The topic was “Corpora: a Translator’s Treasure Box.”

Photo: Daymin Taipei, Taiwan

Dr. Jin Huei Dai, Assistant Professor of Chinese, was invited for a three day Teaching Chinese Workshop at Hsinchu University of Education (Hsinchu, Taiwan) on Dec. 6th, Dec. 20th 2010, and Jan. 3rd 2011. The workshop went very well and afterwards Professor Dai was asked to give a few related talks before she left for the U.S.

Stay posted for other exciting news and events about our professors and graduate students!

Uwe Muegge’s Presentation at IMUG Meeting

On January 13, Professor Uwe Muegge gave a live presentation at the monthly meeting of IMUG, the International Multilingual Users Group. In his presentation titled “TermWiki: Terminology management in the cloud“, Professor Muegge discussed the many benefits collaborative terminology management with a tool like TermWiki has over traditional, document-centric terminology management approaches. This meeting, hosted at Adobe’s corporate headquarters in San Jose, was attended by approximately 50 industry experts, including several MIIS alumni and students.

Found In Translation Lecture: The Case of Regional Culture in Japan

The 9th lecture in the Found In Translation series

When: Tuesday, November 23. 12:15 - 1:45 in McGowan 102

Speaker: Dr. Andrew Murakami-Smith, Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Language and Culture at Osaka University.

After graduating from Claremont McKenna College, Andrew Murakami-Smith worked as a translator in a lawyers office in Tokyo. A Ph.D. in Modern Japanese Literature from Princeton University was followed by a year and a half translating in-house for a patent lawyer in Osaka. Currently an Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Language and Culture at Osaka University, he teaches English to Japanese undergrads, a course in modern Japanese Literature in English translation to international students, and an introductory course on translation to graduate students. His Ph.D. dissertation focused on Japanese dialects (regional varieties) in modern literary works, and he has a continuing interest in regional dialects and cultures in Japan, especially the dialect, culture, and image of Osaka.

Lecture Title: Translating Culture: The Case of Regional Culture in Japan

In literary translation, written representation of local dialects (regional varieties) in characters speech, like humor, may be something that is lost in translation. However, just as translators of Lewis Carroll cannot ignore the untranslatable bits of humor and wordplay, translators of Huckleberry Finn, for example, must somehow attempt to translate local dialects. What are some strategies that might be used? And what of other bits of local color? References to a specific region may include geographical names, names of restaurants and shops, local dishes, cultural practices or concepts, and (stereo)typical temperaments and personalities.

Photo: New York Public Library

In Japanese Literature, works set in or relating to Osaka may include (written representation of) local dialect and all or some of the above local color. What strategies have been used by translators of such works into English? Have they had some idea of translation of culture in mind as they translated the words and sentences of the source texts? Attempting a richer translation of the nuances of local color and regional culture will admittedly result in a foreignizing translation that will place a greater burden on the reader of the target text. On the other hand, what are some benefits that might justify such an attempt? These are some of the questions this talk will investigate, with specific examples of Osaka literary works and attempts at English translation.

Uwe Muegge’s Presentation at Virtual Translation Conference

On November 10, 2010 Professor Uwe Muegge gave a live presentation as part of the Global Translation Consumers Virtual Conference, an event that attracted registrants from 67 countries. In his webinar titled Reining in the cloud: A call for managed collaboration, Professor Muegge discussed the role of cloud sourcing in the localization process, and how the need for managed collaboration can be met by using wiki-based collaborative solutions like TermWiki. After his presentation, Professor Muegge moderated a Focus Group on the topic “Clouds, Crowds or Clowns?”.

View of the countries of origin of the registrants for this virtual conference. Source: proz.com

This webinar marked the tenth item on professor Muegge’s publication list in 2010. The eleventh, his contribution to the proceedings of the Leipzig International Conference on Translation & Interpretation Studies, another paper on TermWiki, is currently in printing.