Amy Marcus – Language Learning – The Way to Go (French, Italian, some Spanish and some Hindi)

International Education Management, Master of Public Administration, Student Stories

Story taken from interview with Amy, IEM/MPA, ’18; Written by K.Throgmorton

Amy’s language journey started when she was very young and has only grown as her passion for language has developed and matured.

Miranda Meyer – Spanish and Me: A Love/Hate Relationship (Spanish)

International Education Management, Master of Public Administration

Story written by Miranda Meyer, IEM/MPA, ’18

Spanish and I have a love/hate relationship. Some days I absolutely love listening to it, speaking it, and thinking about it. Other days, I struggle to come up with words, my pronunciation is terrible, and if I hear one more song in Spanish I want to scream.

Francesca Aka – Breaking Down Barriers Through Multilingualism (French, Italian, Spanish, English)

Master of Public Administration, Student Stories

Story taken from interview with Francesca Aka, MPA, ’18; Written by K.Throgmorton

fran-3Growing up a ‘third culture kid,’ Francesca learned quickly how to adapt to new places and new people. Francesca describes being a third culture kid as being a bridge between cultures. She navigates her family culture and the dominant culture of wherever she is.

Karla Piacentini – Bridging Cultures, Exploring Identities (Spanish, Ilonggo)

Master of Public Administration, Student Stories

Story taken from interview with Karla Piacentini, IEM/MPA, ’17; Written by K.Throgmorton

“The limits of my language are the limits of my world.” ~Ludwig Wittgenstein

Language is a bridge that connects people across cultures that engenders an intimate authenticity among language learners. Learning a new language forces you to make mistakes and falter in efforts to gain a better handle on the new language.

Natalie Cox – Progress in Unlikely Places (French)

Master of Public Administration, Student Stories

10k in Marseille 2012Story written by Natalie Cox, MPA, ’14

I began learning French as an eighth grader in a small town in Washington State. It was a largely arbitrary decision, in part governed by fantasy of windows to new worlds opening, and the possibility to connect with a large number of new people, previously closed off to a girl from middle-class America.