Frontier Market Scouts

Connecting social investors with entrepreneurs on the ground

Frontier Market Scouts

Applications Open for Winter 2015 FMS Fellowship Program – Apply Today!

July 29th, 2014 · No Comments · Uncategorized

Corey-Nairobi

Frontier Market Scouts (FMS) is now accepting applications through September 5, 2014 for the winter 2015 trainings in Monterey, California and Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Earn a certificate in impact investment and social enterprise management and gain invaluable field experience with a social entrepreneur or impact investment manager for 2-12 months in the US or abroad!

Who are we seeking?

FMS is looking for passionate and pragmatic idealists who hold a strong belief in enterprise and market development as the most important means to large scale and sustainable improvement of living standards in developing countries. The ideal Frontier Market Scout also has a solid background in business and/or management, and a superb aptitude for immersive learning in dramatically different environments. Applicants should have completed a Bachelor’s degree or its equivalence, although highly qualified undergraduate applicants may also be considered.

Application Process

  • Candidates can apply online at http://go.miis.edu/fmsapp.
  • Application Deadlines: August 8, 2014 (early admission), September 5, 2014 (regular admission)

Training Locations and Dates

  • Monterey, CA: January 12-23, 2015
  • Amsterdam, NL: February 16-27, 2015

Ready to start your adventure? Apply Now

If you have additional questions, please email fms@miis.edu or call Erina McWilliam-Lopez at (831) 647-4645.

For more information, visit www.fmscouts.org. Read our blog at blogs.miis.edu/frontier/. Follow us on Twitter @FMScouts and on Facebook at facebook.com/frontiermarketscouts.

Tags:

Featured FMS Partner: Ayla Schlosser, Founder and Executive Director of Resonate

July 24th, 2014 · No Comments · Africa, Frontier Market Scouts, Scouts in the Field, Uncategorized

Ayla_Training_1.jpg

This post was submitted by MPA student and FMS alumna Nicole Manapol

Stories matter. Many stories matter. Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign,but stories can also be used to empower and to humanize. – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, The Danger of a Single Story (TED)

Stories are transformative – whether it’s the “official” story of a despotic regime, a beloved myth or the self-destructive narratives we sometimes play in our heads.

No one understands this better than FMS Partner Ayla Schlosser, Founder and Executive Director of Resonate – a startup teaching leadership skills to women and girls through a training course rooted in storytelling. Launched just over a year ago and based in Rwanda, Resonate was founded on the principle that stories matter. Through her background in community organizing and communications consulting, Ayla saw firsthand the importance of storytelling as a tool for affecting change and building leadership capacity. As Ayla often remarks – a compelling story can mean the difference between having an idea about how to fix a problem and actually leading the charge for community-based solutions.

Seeing the potential of narrative-based leadership training in other contexts outside the US, Ayla began looking for organizations where she could use her expertise to catalyze work already being done with women internationally. When no such organization materialized, Ayla (in true entrepreneurial fashion) decided to start her own company…in a country (Rwanda) she had never visited. When asked about the risk of traveling halfway across the world to test a market in which she had no prior experience – Ayla responded – you’re never going to have all the information – at some point you’ve just got to dive in and see what happens…

 In October 2013 Ayla was off to Rwanda.

Why Rwanda? Although Ayla had no prior experience in Rwanda, there were a lot of reasons that made it an ideal place to pilot Resonate’s training. Over the past 20 years Rwanda has been working hard to rebuild its economy. Women’s economic empowerment has been a central feature of the government’s recovery strategy, creating a favorable environment for women’s leadership initiatives. Rwanda also has a strong tradition of oral leadership making the training a good cultural fit.

Resonate training

Why Rwanda? Although Ayla had no prior experience in Rwanda, there were a lot of reasons that made it an ideal place to pilot Resonate’s training. Over the past 20 years Rwanda has been working hard to rebuild its economy. Women’s economic empowerment has been a central feature of the government’s recovery strategy, creating a favorable environment for women’s leadership initiatives. Rwanda also has a strong tradition of oral leadership making the training a good cultural fit.

But perhaps the most compelling reason to launch in Rwanda was a strong partner – the Akilah Intitute for Women, an East African women’s college. As a graduate of Smith College, an all women’s school in the US, Ayla felt a natural affinity with Akilah. Her first training at the college with a group of female journalists still counts as one of her best moments since launching Resonate. Prior to conducting the training, Ayla worried about how participants would receive it – would it make sense? Would it fit the culture? The outcome is something Ayla still proudly recalls. The women got it…but not only did they get it – they were transformed by it. For most of the women at Akilah and also at subsequent trainings that was the first time they had ever told their story, felt how their personal narratives could resonate with others – how they could affect and inspire change. One of the women in a Resonate training later related to Ayla that she keeps the video clip of herself telling her story on her phone to remind herself of that moment – the moment she truly recognized her own strength and what she had to offer others.

Solange

Resonate Workshop

With less than a year since launching programs on the ground in Rwanda – Resonate is poised to expand into Kenya and potentially other countries in the Region. Ayla attributes much of her success to her staff on the ground –in particular lead trainer Solange Impanoyimana who came to the project with a strong background in community development, storytelling and radio and who has already taken ownership of the enterprise. Friends, family and professional networks were also incredibly helpful to Ayla as she sought points of contact within Rwanda, developed marketing and communications strategies, fundraised or just simply needed advice.

Ayla recognizes programs like Frontier Market Scouts, which provided her with the talent and human resources to support operations. As a busy entrepreneur, traveling between Rwanda and the US and trying to launch a business, having the time to recruit and screen candidates is a major challenge. The benefit of working with FMS is having the program vet top candidates for you. Through this process Resonate was able to hire Donna Sinar, an MPA candidate at the Monterey Institute of International Studies with significant management experience in the non-profit sector. As a startup, priorities are constantly changing. What Ayla likes best about Donna and her FMS preparation is her ability to be flexible and respond to whatever new priority may arise on a daily basis.

Moving forward Ayla is considering different business models to generate revenue to sustain Resonate, including crowdfunding and a one-for-one training model with corporate CSR programs. There is a lot of interest and demand for Resonate’s Storytelling for Leadership training. The challenge now she says is being strategic about what she pursues given the size and capacity of her team. Other challenges involve fundraising – as many entrepreneurs know you need a history of funding to get funding.

But Ayla is undeterred – my approach is collaborative, I don’t want to re-invent the wheel. This is an exciting time for Resonate – particularly for anyone interested in Resonate’s work. As a startup we are constantly evolving. People who get involved with us now have the unique opportunity to shape what Resonate will be…

Interested in Resonate’s work? Learn how you can get involved: www.resonateworkshops.org

Interested in becoming an FMS Partner? Apply here

For more information, visit www.fmscouts.org. Read our blog at blogs.miis.edu/frontier/. Follow us on Twitter @FMScouts and on Facebook at facebook.com/frontiermarketscouts.

 

Tags:··

Heading off the beaten track: an interview with FMS Fellow Catriona Forrester

July 8th, 2014 · No Comments · Frontier Market Scouts, Scouts in the Field, Uncategorized

antigua

This post was submitted by MPA student and FMS alumna Nicole Manapol

In many ways July is synonymous with independence. In America we have our 4th of July celebration, in France there is Bastille Day, even the Northern Territory of Australia celebrates its anniversary of self-governance on July 1st. Worldwide there are 22 national independence days celebrated during the month of July.

In the spirit of celebrating independence this month I decided to interview FMS Fellow Catriona “Cat” Forrester, a mid-30s finance professional from Australia, who is forging a new path for herself in the impact investing space with the Frontier Market Scouts Program. At midnight July 7th, Cat boarded her flight to Guatemala City to embark on her new adventure with Pomona Impact, an angel investment group that targets small to medium sized impact businesses across Mexico, Central America, and Ecuador. Over the next 12 months Cat will be based in Antigua, Guatemala helping Pomona identify and invest in high caliber social entrepreneurs, launch Guatemala’s first Impact Hub and develop a new impact fund in the region.

In this interview Cat talks about her decision for a career and life change in her mid-30s, and advice to new applicants on how to get the most out of the Frontier Market Scouts program.

You had a great job in finance, working from some of the most dynamic cities in the world (Sydney and London!) with frequent opportunities to travel across the Asia-Pacific – what motivated you to shift direction and become an FMS fellow?

I have a great career – it’s still evolving! My 15 years of work experience has been in finance, which has allowed me to travel for work and do business in some very exciting places. I’ve had the opportunity to work in Sydney, Melbourne and London. After a short lived stint in London at a hedge fund, I returned to Sydney and started to re-assess my career path. Maybe it was finally settling into the apartment I owned or being back in the city where I was born that felt unsettling after being so nomadic over the past several years… the idea of the “status quo” quite scared me. I had always been fascinated by emerging markets and felt I could apply my financial and Spanish language skills in an impact investing environment. I also realized that picking up and moving to a developing country on the other side of the world was a luxury that I may not be able to afford in a few years.

So why the Frontier Market Scouts Program?

I was fortunate to have the opportunity for frequent travel during my career. With a focus on the Asia-Pacific I traveled extensively throughout Asia. I went to Japan, China, Singapore, Macau, the Philippines, and Hong Kong to name a few. I travelled in Sri Lanka in 2006 and traveled all over Latin America. I had also done some translation work for UNDP projects in Burkina Faso, Zidisha a microfinance group in West Africa, and ASAED, an independent children’s welfare group in Senegal. This really piqued my interest in social enterprise and impact investing. Whatever my next move was going to be I knew I wanted to explore this space.

I also knew that as an emergent sector, social enterprise and impact investing were difficult to break into – this was the main reason I decided to apply to the Frontier Market Scouts Program. The placement with a social enterprise or impact investment organization plus the two-week training seemed like a good opportunity to get my foot in the door. The opportunity to come to Monterey, California was also appealing for the networking opportunities it afforded with impact organizations in the San Francisco Bay Area.

And now you’ve landed a job with Pomona Impact and are about to board a flight to Guatemala. How are you feeling?

Excited…trepidacious…I love Latin America. I wanted to be in a Spanish-speaking country and working in a position in impact investing so I’m quite lucky to be placed with Pomona. I’m aware of the security situation in Guatemala, which is serious in some places, but I’ve traveled in similar contexts in Asia so I feel confident that I have the experience to avoid any potential issues.

And you’ve just survived public transport in Los Angeles including a surprise trip through Compton…

[laughter] Yes! That was quite empowering! Overall I’m excited about learning something new…about growing and finding out where all this might lead.

What advice would you give future applicants considering the FMS Fellowship?

Make use of the resources the Monterey Institute provides. The best part of the FMS experience so far was the support I received throughout the whole process from application to placement, to training and professional networking. The FMS program has an expansive network to tap into but it is up to you to take advantage of that and be proactive. At the end of the day this space is all about the hustle!

Great advice Cat – you’re quite an inspiration and we wish you the best of luck on your new adventure…

Cat is one of 13 FMS Fellows about to embark on field assignments in Guatemala, Costa Rica, Cameroon, Rwanda, Ghana, Hungary, the Netherlands, and the US. Since 2011, the Frontier Market Scouts fellowship has trained over 240 social enterprise professionals and graduate students from 20 countries worldwide. FMS fellows have helped to scale over 100 social enterprises around the world during field assignments based in Holland, Brazil, India, Ecuador, Vietnam, Tanzania, Kenya, South Africa, Turkey, Egypt, China, Colombia, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Belize, Lebanon and more. Training faculty come from renowned social enterprise organizations such as Village Capital, Shell Foundation, Invested Development and Accion.

Keep up with Cat and other fellows at http://www.miis.edu/academics/short/frontier-market-scouts/fellows/currentfellows

For more information, visit www.fmscouts.org. Read our blog at blogs.miis.edu/frontier/. Follow us on Twitter @FMScouts and on Facebook at facebook.com/frontiermarketscouts.

byoearth

 

 

 

Tags:··

Frontier Market Scouts Take on the World Of Social Impact Investing

June 30th, 2014 · No Comments · FMS in Action, Frontier Market Scouts, Socent, Uncategorized, Village Capital

This post was submitted by MPA and FMS alumna Danielle Steer.

It’s not every day that a person can sit at a pub watching the World Cup and listen to four different languages at the surrounding tables, while discussing impact investing as a poverty alleviation strategy. Unless, of course, you’re a part of the Monterey Institute community. Today, this is my lunch break.

This experience seems apropos considering I’ve just finished two intense weeks in a classroom with 30 other inspiring, diverse, and experienced individuals and practitioners for the Monterey Institute’s Frontier Market Scouts (FMS) program.

FMS Group Work

Participants from Around the World

I was unsure at first what types of professionals might be attracted to the program. My career has previously focused on gender education and development; so I was excited to learn more about how entrepreneurship could help build local economies and empower the impoverished. I was beyond pleased on the first day when I found out my colleagues in the class hailed from backgrounds not only in development and the public sector but also big banks and Wall Street. While some were gaining relevant professional experience while in graduate school, others had quit jobs at Visa and Citibank to take part in the training and fellowship. We were also a geographically eclectic group as well with participants from Ireland, USA, Singapore, Australia, Philippines, Cameroon, China, the Netherlands, and Rwanda.

Ross Baird- FMS Instructor

Intense Training with Real Experts

The two week FMS training is broken down into five-two day workshops covering different aspects of social entrepreneurship from the scouting and entrepreneurship to the impact investor perspective.

The first session was taught by Ross Baird, Executive Director at Village Capital. Ross brings a contagious energy to the course and provides a great introduction to impacting investing and social enterprise. From pitching frameworks to impact evaluation criteria for entrepreneurs, we explored various options for how scouts might identify and develop entrepreneurs in emerging markets.

Session two brought a change of pace with Simon Dejardines, currently residing across the pond at the Shell Foundation in London. Although his content was jam packed with how to scale high impact social enterprises, we were able to experiment with various approaches to business support and stakeholder analyses.

The half-way point of the training started with Dr. Yuwei Shi, Dean of the Graduate School of International Policy and Management and founder of the Center for Social Innovation Learning at MIIS. Yuwei focused on an action learning approach to business modeling by bringing in fellow experts on business development and ideation. In addition we explored a live case study, Salud2. Salud2 is a social enterprise at the concept phase started by five MIIS alumni this spring. Although Salud2 was a runner up at the recent Hult Prize competition, the FMS participants were able to go through the a business modeling exercise to help Salud2 consider alternative directions they might take their business before they enroll at the Hult Accelerator this summer.

With two sessions still to go, the FMS crew took a two day break to process the immense information we had covered over the week. We were also able to take advantage of the local beauty and activities along the way!

Feeling rested we returned to the ever charismatic, Paul Berloff of Accion Venture Labs. Paul led us through a series of lectures and activities focusing on investor perspectives on social enterprise.   From the due diligence and the role of investors to the trends and criteria for impact we took an in-depth look at impact investing through the eyes of Accion Venture Labs.

For the final training session, we were joined by two MIIS alumni, Amit Sharma and Ravi Kurani. This workshop provided an overview of the current universe of systems of environmental, social and governance ratings (ESG ratings and analytics), including the ones commonly used in impact investing such as GIIRS. We also walked through the development of ImpactSpace , a start-up with the mission to help capture data and impact measurements for social ventures working with their counterparts.

FMS Participant Nicole Manipole

Putting it All Together

Although I still feel like I’m processing information, theory, methodology, and tools packed into two short weeks there were some definitely themes and big ideas that have been apparent from day one.

In the classroom I learned not only from the practitioners brought in to teach but also my colleagues. The class was a healthy mix of experience and knowledge that allowed us to work in meaningful and balanced groups. When I faltered on financial models, the finance group member was there to simplify the process. When we talked about design and impact the development people helped clarify impact metrics and the methodologies used to understand them.

After class, we learned more about the culture and informal aspects of the impact investing space during happy hour. Each of the practitioners took the time to get to know the participants and share stories about their very different roles in the space.

As a people person, I really enjoyed the importance of relationship-building as a common theme throughout the two-week training. Whether you’re an entrepreneur looking for seed funding or an investor hoping to make an impact, personal connection and human interaction drive the entire process. I feel fortunate that I now have 30 new FMS colleagues in the field and around the world.

FMS Particpants in Big Sur

 

 

Tags:

22 Tips for Living in a New Country

June 26th, 2014 · No Comments · Alumni Stories, Frontier Market Scouts, Scouts in the Field, South America, Uncategorized

MIIS and FMS Alumna Danielle Steer Shares Tips on Living and Working Abroad.

Over the course of the next two months, 21 Frontier Market Scouts (FMS) Fellows will be heading into emerging markets as scouts, business development consultants, and impact investing associates. FMS fellows come from a variety of backgrounds and have very diverse international experiences.  For some, the FMS field placement is a first exposure to living and working in an emerging market.

Travel

As an alumna of the Monterey Institute MPA program, I can’t begin to count the number of experiences my colleagues and I have shared about being a development practitioner including “how to cope” and “methods for success”.

I decided to enlist the help of fellow FMS and Monterey Institute alumni to give our fellows advice for living and working in the developing world. Their collective advice stems from experience in Nigeria, Cameroon, Rwanda, Peru, Ecuador, Philippines, and India.

Tips for Living and Working in an Emerging Economy

  1. Talk to your taxi driver!  They have some of the best suggestions for local places to check out and more generally just some great stories about life.
  2. Get close to a family or two, especially if you’re in a more rural area.  This will give you so much more insight than just hanging with the expat crew.  Have meals with these people a lot.  They will also look out for you.
  3. Invest in a good fan that oscillates, embrace crowded bus rides, and keep a good sense of humor.
  4. It’s okay to be homesick. There may be moments when you long for the safety of “home.”  Find a way to bring a piece of home with you to self-sooth when need be (i.e. a DVD, favorite book, cooking spices and ingredients, or Siracha).
  5. When family and friends visit have them bring you items from “home” like cheddar, mac & cheese boxes, and socks.
  6. Take part in four things that can expedite building relationships – playing sports, music/dancing, food, & drinking (albeit not to excess or to the point where you cannot make sound judgments).
  7. Be prepared for reverse culture shock.  Sure, there will be some initial culture shock when you move out of your home country.  But no one ever prepared me for the reverse culture shock.  It might hit you when you order a coffee in Swahili at Starbucks or when you are overly cautious trying to cross the street in your hometown.  If you can, get in touch with other people who might be experiencing it at the same time or who can sympathize.  That community of people “who get it” when you are stunned by consistent electricity or hot running water is comforting.
Sierra Leone Peacebuilding J-Term Trip

Sierra Leone Peacebuilding J-Term Trip

Money & Safety

  1. In a taxi, lock both back doors. Sometimes people try to open them while you are sitting in traffic.
  2. Keep your money in two places on you. If a thief tries to steal from you, pull out your stack with less money and say that’s all you have.
  3. Keep $50 USD in small bills stashed away in your luggage.
  4. Try to find out before arriving at your assignment whether or not credit/debit cards are commonly accepted.  More often than not, you’ll need to carry cash, so finding an ATM in a well-lit, secure location is key.
  5. Put together a thoughtful budget before you leave.  How much are you willing and/or expecting to pay for housing each month?  Groceries?  It adds up quick, and if you’re traveling with a fixed amount of cash in the bank, you don’t want to find yourself in a sticky financial situation without a backup plan.
  6. A steripen is a great small investment. You can use it anywhere and it saves a bunch of money as opposed to buying bottled water.  It’s also good for the environment.
  7. If you are a single (read: unmarried) female, regardless of having a boyfriend or not, be prepared to frequently explain your lack of husband.  (Side note: You’re not likely to convince an inquiring man to change his stance on the matter, but don’t let it keep you from sharing your point of view.  “Some of my female colleagues chose to wear fake wedding rings to avoid this, but I personally didn’t feel right pretending to be married just to avoid these conversations.”)
  8. Keep your bag or backpack in front of you down by your legs or on your lap when traveling or at a restaurant.
Taksi

Lock the doors!

Keeping in Touch

  1. A picture is worth a thousand words.  Take as many pictures as you can of your community, your work, and your travels but know when to be discreet either out of respect or for your own safety.  It might feel vain, but ask people to take pictures of you in the field as well. It makes for better storytelling and helps your family and friends to better understand what you did. Not to mention when you’re feeling nostalgic upon your return, it’s nice to look back.
  2. Post about your travels via social media. Someone in your network will always have a good recommendation for a connection, place to eat, or site to visit.

Work Life

  1. Patience is a virtue: In Peru, everyone is late, and people have different professional standards. In the end these are all cultural differences and shouldn’t be taken personally.
  2. Take your colleagues out to lunch!  You’ll get a taste for local cuisine, build relationships, and hopefully pick up on some local slang!
Team Peru- Youth in Cacchin

Team Peru- Youth in Cacchin

Final Advice

  1. During rainy season, don’t walk through flood water in the street. There may be a hole in the ground that you don’t see.
  2. Don’t be scared to rock a fanny pack!
  3. Never travel without the following:

                            Pocket knife & sewing kit                                                                  
                            Lighter
                            Small padlock
                            Charcoal pills (for tummy aches and intestinal issues)
                            Calendula cream (for mosquito bites and burns)
                            Duct tape (It really fixes everything!)

Have any intriguing travel tips or stories of your own? Please share them via: professional.dev@miis.edu

Tags:

Geneva Paul

June 24th, 2014 · No Comments · Winter-Summer 2014

Location: New York, NY- USA
Partner: Accion NYC

Geneva has the personality skill set and technical experience to connect investors to entrepreneurs and develop small medium enterprises. She understands the investment decision process and balances this with the operational structure and entrepreneurial passion of the small-medium business owner. Her experience in financial asset management firms includes market due diligence, financial analysis and cash flow modeling, and identifying key risks in debt underwriting. Her latter experiences in finance and operations sharpened her skills to identify key risks in operation systems and workflows and improved her ability to communicate and coordinate with key stakeholders. She desires to leave an indelible mark of loyalty, sedulousness, and compassion to the financial inclusion sector.

Learn more about Frontier Market Scouts

Tags:

Donna Sinar

June 23rd, 2014 · No Comments · Winter-Summer 2014

Location: Rwanda

Partner: Resonate

Donna has committed her heart and energy to the anti-human trafficking movement for over a decade. Most recently, she headed the anti-human trafficking unit at The Standing Against Global Exploitation (SAGE) Project, a survivor-centered nonprofit organization in San Francisco. Donna is an innovative and adaptive leader, a keen strategic planner and a compassionate team builder. Donna is motivated to weave mission with sustainable business practices to urge meaningful change in the areas of migration, poverty, and exploitation. She is fluent in Hebrew and competent in Spanish; a self-starter and industrious. Communication is her strong suit – she is comfortable in boardrooms and in the field alike and is at her best when she is bridging the two spheres.

Learn more about Frontier Market Scouts

Tags:

Catriona Forrester

June 23rd, 2014 · No Comments · Winter-Summer 2014

Location: Antigua, Guatemala

Partner: Pomona Impact

Catriona’s international equities experience of over 7 years as both an analyst and portfolio manager has provided her with expertise in financial modeling and analysis, portfolio management, building relationships with investors and contributing to capital raising efforts. In her current role, Catriona has been working on strategic initiatives for a large listed property company, which has provided her with a strong business planning skill set. Her extensive experience and well-rounded attributes make Catriona well placed to actively contribute to making investment decisions within an impact investing fund. Catriona has a strong interest in working in healthcare, innovation and energy sectors.

Learn more about Frontier Market Scouts

Tags:

Lizzie Merrill

June 23rd, 2014 · No Comments · Winter-Summer 2014

Location: Ghana
Partner: Sekaf

Lizzie has extensive international work experience in development, transnational organizations, and corporate social responsibility. Through her MSc in International Relations, she acquired strong analytical skills to measure and evaluate the impact of social programs and in the nonprofit sector she became well-versed in identifying the characteristics of social ventures and organizations with the greatest potential for success. She developed strong project management, problem-solving, and communications skills through her consulting experience in the private sector, enabling her to independently design and assess programs that generate and scale social impact. Lizzie is passionate about using her cross-sector experience to help organizations translate innovative ideas into successful enterprises.

Learn more about Frontier Market Scouts

Tags:

Stanley King

June 23rd, 2014 · No Comments · Winter-Summer 2014

Location: Rwanda

Partner: Akazi Kanoze

Stan is a proven problem solver with a diverse skillset that enables him to serve in several capacities. He is well suited for operational and business strategy roles at a social enterprise, given his proficiency in negotiating contracts, technology evaluation and development, business strategy and market analysis, marketing, and advising entrepreneurs. He has received awards for his work enabling entrepreneurs to create technology-based start-ups and for his efforts commercializing research innovations. His background in research as a Ph.D. trained neuroscientist and in business development/licensing has allowed him to develop a unique combination of technical skills and business acumen that is valuable to organizations that need individuals to serve across functions.

Learn more about Frontier Market Scouts

Tags:

Katharine Pujol

June 23rd, 2014 · No Comments · Winter-Summer 2014

Location: Xela Quetzaltenango, Guatemala

Partner: Alterna

Katharine has a strong interest in finding innovative ways to engage private markets and cultivate stronger entrepreneur ecosystems to solve social problems. She was able to put her passion into practice in her work for Endeavor which focused on researching and analyzing industries, markets, and business models of high-impact entrepreneurs in emerging markets. Katharine has been taking financial analysis classes to better prepare for conducting investment analysis and building financial models. Having studied biochemistry, medical anthropology, and pre-medicine at Dartmouth and two years during college working with Peruvian’s healthcare system, she is particularly interested in leveraging her understanding of how funds and companies invest, operate and grow to better serve global health systems.

Learn more about Frontier Market Scouts

Tags:

Patrick Malone

June 23rd, 2014 · No Comments · Winter-Summer 2014

Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Xela Quetzaltenango, Guatemala

Partners: Impact Hub Amsterdam and Alterna

Patrick has worked as an impact investor and philanthropist for the past 9 years, which give him a holistic perspective and a skillset in ethics research and development, B Corporation metrics, relationship building, due diligence and deal structuring. Patrick enjoys and excels at strategy work, communication, supporting the best in others by asking important questions, getting to the core of issues and having fun while working. Patrick has recently been helping to build a community of local investors, studying the rights of nature legal work, studying what comprises an economy built on peace rather than the military, and inspiring others through coaching or speaking to take wise risks investing in their values.

Learn more about Frontier Market Scouts

Tags:

Tyler Clark

June 23rd, 2014 · No Comments · Winter-Summer 2014

Location: Antigua, Guatemala

Partner: Pomona Impact

Tyler has gained valuable experience in financial analysis while working for an institutional investment consultancy and managing portfolios for high net worth individuals.  In his prior role as Director of Investments at Strategic Financial Associates, he was responsible for developing firm-wide investment strategy, including asset allocation, evaluating investment opportunities, and communicating firm strategy with clients.  He has direct experience working with an impact investment fund, volunteering as a Research Associate for Encite Capital, a startup focused on investing in SGBs in Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

Learn more about Frontier Market Scouts

Tags:

Elliot Grossman

June 23rd, 2014 · No Comments · Winter-Summer 2014

Location: Santa Teresa, Costa Rica

Partner: Makanas 

Elliot Grossman graduated from University of California Santa Cruz in 2011 with a major in Business Management Economics and minor in Information and Technology Systems Management. After college he worked for two technology firms in sales and marketing. His professional experience in sales and marketing and extensive background in business has given him expertise in: analyzing target customers, strategic problem-solving, data research and analytics, the organization of information, basic accounting, and communication. Elliot has the professional background, dedication and perseverance to contribute to microfinance and investment firms.

Learn more about Frontier Market Scouts

 

Tags:

Sophia Mortensen

June 23rd, 2014 · No Comments · Winter-Summer 2014

Location: Houston, Texas – USA

Partner: Chilton Capital

Sophia has a varied background including relevant coursework from the politics of developing countries to international security, and work in multiple nonprofit organizations. She has worked in various capacities, including administrative support, research, working with databases, event and conference planning. At the College of William & Mary she has held multiple intern and research assistant positions covering international foreign aid, social conflict, and an e-internship with US Air Combat Command. She has Arabic language skills and has worked in Syria at the Balis archaeological site and spent last summer completing her Monroe Scholar research project in Germany and Austria, while learning basic German language.

Learn more about Frontier Market Scouts

Tags: