Monday, September 18th, 2017

Unicorn Strategies: Like Magic, But Better

Ever wonder what happens to graduates once they leave MIIS? We spoke with recent graduate Lieselotte Siegenthaler, a consulting partner at Unicorn Strategies, to get the scoop!

Unicorn Strategies (located in Washington, D.C.) is a company that provides pro bono chief of staff services to retired national security leaders. In exchange, these leaders make themselves available for client projects where they work with young women in national security to solve real world client problems.

Could you tell me a little bit about your background and how it led you to Unicorn Strategies?

In undergrad I interned in both the public and private sector, including stints at the Department of Commerce, at a private tech security firm in Germany and with a human rights lawyer at the UN in Geneva. After graduating, I worked in administration at tech security companies in San Francisco. Working in these positions exposed me to various smaller scale security issues and avenues towards intercultural communication.

Last summer I interned at the American Security Project, where I met my business partner, Maggie, who was Chief of Staff to the CEO at the time. We collaborated on a project involving Timor-Leste and Australia’s maritime boundary dispute and the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea. Part of the project included interviewing the Prime Minister of Timor-Leste, as well as liaising with Australian diplomats and American political figures. In working together, we realized while we have different professional backgrounds, our skill and knowledge sets complemented each other’s.

In interacting with and researching the many think tanks and nonprofits in DC, I learned about the pivotal role that retired national security leaders play in these organizations. Maggie’s extensive experience working with retired flag officers at American Security Project afforded her significant insight into how the officers were able to succeed after retiring, and how sometimes they do not have the opportunity to properly use their expertise after transitioning out of government. In addition to recognizing security leaders’ post-retirement contributions to national security, we noticed, and sometimes experienced, the challenges of being a woman in security. Both of our professional and academic lives provided us with large networks of young women either aspiring to work or already working in security.

While thinking about these two groups Maggie and I identified gaps that may prevent them from achieving their career goals. For many retired national security leaders, it’s the gap between their capabilities and how much they are able to contribute to the national security space. For young women working in security, it is the gap between them and the retired leaders, which inhibits their opportunity for mentorship and network expansion.

How/When did you create this company?

After I returned to MIIS for the fall semester and Maggie started her master’s program at Georgetown, we continued to explore the two gaps. Unicorn Strategies came together over the course of the next several months, after recognizing not only the connected gaps such as retired leaders and a network of young women in security, but also acknowledging the impact of our combined skill set in filling that need. Our official foundation date was February 2017 when we won our first contract and we moved into our office April (come visit us!). It’s been a learning process, but we love Unicorn because it allows us to work both in and outside of the traditional national security system to support a more equitable, free, and prosperous world.

What does that mean in practice? 

The chief of staff services translates to helping security leaders use their knowledge and skills as they transition out of government and into the private sector. This can include getting them on retainer at a news organization, an advisory position at consulting firm, or speaking engagements. They are also currently working with one retired IC leader to do a Track II dialogue in Eastern Europe!

In addition to the chief of staff services, companies and advocacy organizations approach us to complete projects, such as writing op-eds, or advising on specific policy issues. To work on the projects, we partner young women in security with the leaders we are staffing. This facilitates knowledge transfer, grows everyone’s networks, and creates mentorship opportunities.

To learn more about Unicorn Strategies go to info@unicornstrategies.com

OR if you are looking for a Fall internship they are hiring! Join the herd.

 

 

Friday, September 15th, 2017

January and Spring Break Off-Site Courses and Special Trainings

GSIPM students now view initial information on international programs and special trainings offered in January and over Spring Break at http://go.miis.edu/practica.

January Off-Site Program Locations:

-Cuba

-Peru

-Colombia

-Egypt

-Rwanda

-France

-Czech Republic

January On-Campus Trainings and Courses:

-DPMI–International Development and Social Change

-FMS—Social Enterprise Management and Impact Investing

-Note: Additional courses including many 1-unit workshops taking place in January 2018 will be announced in early November when the spring course schedule is posted.

Spring Break Opportunities:

-The Balkans

-Washington, DC Career Exploration

Please check-back regularly as student budgets are posted on each program website.

Students with interests outside the programs offered, are encouraged to design their own experience. MIIS immersive learning funding can be used to offset the cost of a self-led applied learning project in the US or abroad over Jterm. Schedule a meeting with your career advisor or IPLSP Director Carolyn Meyer through Zócalo to brainstorm options.

Contact: 

Carolyn Taylor Meyer

Director of Immersive Professional Learning and Special Programs, GSIPM

831-647-6417

cmeyer@miis.edu

Thursday, September 14th, 2017

DPMI & DPMI Plus INFO SESSION 2017

2 or 3-week international development and social change training open to all degree programs with optional credit-bearing internship/job fellowship open to DPP and IEP students.

All students interested in DPMI & DPMI PLUS, are recommended to attend this INFO SESSION on Tuesday, Sept 19, 2017, at Casa Fuente-434.

Click here to read more

Tuesday, September 12th, 2017

Top Tips for MIISfits on the Professional Prowl

Already fantasizing about the incredible summer internship you’re going to land? Good! You should be. If not, I’m here to plant the seed.

 

The truth is, summer seems like a grueling academic year away, but it’s lurking just around the corner.  Without a swipe left, swipe right graduate internship app option, identifying interesting organizations and cruising MIIS resources now will prevent you from giving the “OMG OMG OMG” crazy eyes to your advisors this May.

 

I sat down with Donna York (IPD ’18 – goldmine of good advice) to reflect on her time Interning for the Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction branch of the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) in Geneva.

 

Top Tips for MIISfits on the Professional Prowl:


Be that annoying person who sees your advisor all the time. Planning is super important. I met with my advisor Scott Webb almost once a week to ask questions and get reassurance that I was doing everything right (Scott is good at the reassurance part).

 

Perfect the basics. Get your resume and cover letter absolutely perfect in the fall so you are set to send them out. Organizations like the UN see having mistake-free materials as just checking the first box.

 

Apply. Apply. Apply. I started sending things out early and applied for 30 internships across the UN and over a dozen more at organizations that interested me in Washington D.C. If I could, I would have applied for even more.

 

Get financial support. I have applied for and received MIIS Immersive Professional Learning (IPL) funding twice. The process to apply was simple and the deliverables I was required to submit for receiving it were flexible.

 

Be that annoying person (again) that e-mails all the time. Once you’ve landed the internship, build your network. You have nothing to lose in making connections. Even if you don’t have a specific ask for that person in the moment, you never know when they might pop into your life again in the future. Seriously, always follow up after an information session, coffee, or even if someone gives you their card.

 

 


For more application inspiration, explore MIIS Immersive Learning Programs  and keep an eye on Zócalo for hot leads.

 

You can also check out more MIIS immersive learning examples from all over the world at the Immersive Learning Project Portal.   

 

Tuesday, September 5th, 2017

Tech in the Tenderloin Hackathon & Tech Fair

Calling all creative MIISfits interested in flexing your ideation and innovation muscles!

Click here to read more

Monday, July 17th, 2017

Call for Application: Certificate in International Development & Social Change

Certificate in International Development and Social Change

A professional graduate certificate program for careers in program design, partnering, management, and innovation (DPMI)

Launch Your Career

This program is designed for aspiring development and social change practitioners seeking expanded career opportunities in program design, partnering, management, and innovation (DPMI). You’ll gain the program design, evaluation, strategic partnering, and facilitation skills needed to launch a career in international development, becoming part of a global network of over 1,300 DPMI alumni tackling the world’s most pressing problems.

Intensive Hands-on Training

The highly interactive, participatory, and student-centered curriculum includes three modules:

Designing & Managing Development Projects

  • Design and assess projects that foster sustainable development
  • Use simulations and case study exercises to learn the approaches widely used by multinational organizations such as USAID, World Bank, and UNDP

Facilitating Participatory Development

  • Master the tools and techniques to be an effective facilitator, trainer, and change agent
  • Understand the importance of local human resource development
  • Learn to transfer skills to communities so they can conduct their own training programs

Social Entrepreneurship & Strategic Partnering

  • Conduct analyses of vision and mission in a context of social entrepreneurship
  • Identify core competencies and forge strategic partnerships for organizational effectiveness
  • Use innovative software applications for challenging simulations

International Faculty

The program is taught by internationally renowned specialists who have extensive knowledge of the development field, including Beryl Levinger of the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, Evan Bloom, formerly of Pact, and co-founder of Root Change, and Sharon Bean of USAID.

Upcoming Training: 
  • Monterey, CA: January 8-26, 2018
  • Rwanda: January 9-18, 2018
Application Deadline for Monterey and Rwanda:
  • Early Review and International Applicant* Deadline: September 1, 2017
  • Final Application Deadline: October 31, 2017

To find our more visit our webpage or email us at dpmi@miis.edu 

Student Testimonials and featured alumni 

TO APPLY, FILL OUT AN ONLINE APPLICATION FORM

Monday, July 3rd, 2017

Reflections on DPMI 2017 Washington, DC

26 participants successfully completed three-week Certificate in International Development and Social Change program on June 23, 2017. The participants constituted United College Scholars, Middlebury Institute and Middlebury College Students, and international development professionals. As a field visit, the participants got opportunities to visit several development organizations in DC and explore the trends in the development sector. Read the testimonies of the United World Scholars below: 

I applied for the DPMI program because of its relevance to my current role at a microfinance technology startup. Tasked with creating and implementing pilot interventions I was actively searching for frameworks with which to formalize the design process within my organization. In addition to learning and practicing with tools on program design, I gained critical leadership skills, design thinking exercises, and was given time to develop my theory of change within the development sector. A major highlight of the DPMI program was getting to know the other cohort members- especially the UWC participants.

The group work exercises allowed us to learn from each other’s academic, professional and personal experiences with development. Beryl’s weeklong simulation was also a deeply immersive learning experience. I appreciated the visit to the Organization of the American States (OAS) as an opportunity to visualize an alternative path within the development sector. Ultimately, the DPMI program, along with the framework and tools imparted will be relevant irrespective of which sector they are approached and utilized through.  

Amita Ramachandran, Macalester College, ’15 (Economics & International Development)

 

When I applied for the DPMI program, I was a senior International Politics and Economics major at Middlebury College. I directed most of my academic career towards an interdisciplinary pursuit of subjects related to international development. My interest in the field has been largely shaped and informed by my experiences at home in the Philippines; I constantly think about how I might contribute to the betterment of my country and society.

Three weeks of DPMI was crucial in my efforts to build connections between the theoretical approach I was exposed to in a liberal arts education, and the practical tools and skills applied in the field. It was inspiring to learn from such seasoned instructors and facilitators, the frameworks that are widely used in addressing global and systemic problems. While it might be a few years before I pursue a career in international development, I am grateful to DPMI for allowing me a close look at some of what international development work could involve.

Gabbie Santos, Middlebury College ’17 (International Politics & Economics)

 

 

Monday, July 3rd, 2017

DPMI brings MIDD & MIIS students together in Washington, DC

25 participants gathered in Washington, DC, in June 2017 for the Certificate in International Development and Social Change, a professional graduate certificate program offered by Middlebury Institute. The certificate program centers around careers in program design, partnering, management, and Innovation (DPMI). The participants constituted Middlebury College & MIIS students, UWC Scholars, and International Development and Social Change practitioners. The DPMI program has been a big draw for MIIS and MIDD students that allows them to connect and build bridges between the two Middlebury campuses in Vermont and California. The students are not just learning about the recipes of international development and social change, but they are also connecting with one another and learning to work together.

The Certificate in International Development and Social Change program is also offered in January 2018 at Monterey. Please share this with someone who might be interested. To learn more about the program, click here.

Friday, June 23rd, 2017

Amy Nguyen is taking DPMI beyond the classroom.

Hello! My name is Amy Nguyen, and today I will be sharing my experience in the Design, Partnering, Management and Innovation (DPMI) program in Monterey this past May.

A bit about me: Within the Development Practice and Policy (DPP) program, I am working towards a Master in Public in Administration (MPA) with a specialization in Monitoring, Evaluation, and Design. Prior to MIIS, I worked for the organization, Relief International (RI) (www.ri.org), where I am a still a member of its Performance Accountability and Learning team.

DPMI was a big draw for me when I applied to MIIS. I liked the idea of learning not only how to design projects, but also how to flip the traditional design process: how to make it more dynamic, more iterative and more community-oriented.

The two instructors, Beryl Levinger and Evan Bloom, have designed a unique, very hands-on learning environment. Over the span of the two weeks, we did all our work in teams: in the first week, to identify a development challenge facing a country and design a project, and, in the second week, to design a social innovation through collaborating.

These team projects took my mind to incredible places: first, to the coastal Ayeyarwady region in Myanmar, and, then, to the mountainous community of Barillas, Guatemala. Both projects involved understanding and addressing challenges facing farmers. Throughout the two weeks, we mixed and matched approaches, learning traditional tools and methodologies (e.g. as results frameworks and indicators) along with emerging ones (e.g. human-centered design, social network analysis).

My DPMI cohort was a fantastic group of working professionals and students. Each of us brought a different lens to the table: health, gender, migration, environment, education, and others. We asked hard questions. We brainstormed. We listened. And, just as importantly, we had fun. Somewhere in the mayhem of Google Drive folders, sticky notes, and team ground rules, our cohort was buzzing with energy and a sense of purpose. It felt like we were learning new approaches to think and work through development challenges… with some of the very colleagues whom we may be working alongside in the future.

DPMI has opened up new areas of work for me at RI. I am becoming more involved in the development of our new global partnerships strategy. This summer, I am completing my practicum with our Myanmar country team, focusing on ways to strengthen program quality through monitoring and evaluation (M&E), design and strategy. All of my deliverables will be tied to content from the DPMI modules. I’m excited to see my newfound skills and knowledge spring to life; as Beryl would say, I am excited to “hit the ground thinking.”

 

People, systems, and process matter a lot to me. Upon returning back to school, I felt it was important for me to become exposed to the methodologies, tools, and approaches that honor that principle. In the development field, we spend a lot of time in the development feeling stuck: The problems are great, and they are many. It is easy to feel beholden to the traditional way of doing things. DPMI beckoned us to do differently, and I am a better practitioner now because of it.

Tuesday, June 20th, 2017

Immersive Learning Student Portal is Live!

Read about students’ immersive learning projects all around the world including in the United States from 2014-2017.  Click here to visit the student portal. The student portal is a compilation of immersive learning experiences of MIIS students along with their project deliverables.

Immersive learning is the learning that occurs when students are outside of the traditional role of teacher and student. Immersive learning is collaborating with other people, organizations, and governments. It is the critical process of applying critical thinking and is a cornerstone of the Middlebury Institute of International Studies (MIIS) pedagogical philosophy on helping students develop skills and knowledge for preparing students to build a better world. 

Immersive Learning Programs include internships, DPMI +, IPSS, J-term & Spring Practica, summer opportunities, and directed studies. Through immersive learning programs, students take part in projects where they are outside of the traditional role of teacher and student.

To learn more about Immersive Professional Learning Programs and funding click here

 

Monday, June 19th, 2017

Do you have a social venture that needs funding to launch it?

The D-Prize social venture competition is live!   If selected we will award you up to $20,000 to launch a pilot in any region where extreme poverty exists. D-Prize funds new entrepreneurs who increase access to proven poverty interventions. Can you design a business or NGO that solves one of the Distribution Challenges below:

+ GIRL’S EDUCATION

+ AGRICULTURE

+ ENERGY

+ GLOBAL HEALTH

+ EDUCATION

+ GOVERNANCE AND INFRASTRUCTURE

+ CUSTOM

Interested in applying? Visit www.d-prize.org for details.

 

Monday, May 15th, 2017

IEMer Heather Rahimi Excels on South Korean Practicum

Heather Rahimi MAIEM ‘17 has spent the last four months on practicum at the University of Utah Asia campus in Incheon, South Korea.  Having never set foot on the Asian continent prior to her practicum, Heather utilized takeaways from her MIIS coursework, non-verbal communication and flexibility to excel throughout her experience.

What has been the most surprising thing you have encountered on your practicum in Korea?

Seeing as it’s my first time in South Korea, let alone Asia, I have encountered many surprises. I think the biggest surprise, or at least the one that has had the biggest positive impact on me, is understanding that one doesn’t need verbal language to communicate with others. My Korean is limited to “hello”, “thank you”, and “goodbye”, so coming here inspired a certain amount of fear in me. However, I discovered so much can be said without words, especially in Korea. A simple grunt can say a million words! These days I grunt at everything, it can mean “yes”, “oh!”, “I understand”, “I’m so sorry”, you name it! So here is a word of caution to all those who see me after I return state-side, be prepared for countless grunts, warm smiles, and a little bit of pushing.

Credit: Snow College News

What has been one of the most valuable skills or takeaways from your coursework at MIIS that has helped you succeed in your practicum work?

I was pretty nervous for my first day on the job, I was certain I wouldn’t know anything and would have to constantly ask my supervisor for help. But, I quickly found out, my coursework at MIIS had taught me so much more than I thought and left me utterly, if not overly, prepared for this position. I was most grateful for the skills I learned in my Staff Management course. Even as an intern, I definitely needed to manage up, be aware of cross-cultural differences, such as communication styles, and be prepared to lead a meeting when no one else was up for the task.

How has your experience in Korea informed what you hope to do next (whether or not you know what that is at the moment)?

My practicum position at UAC has taught me many invaluable lessons and enabled me to grow as a person and a professional. As an intern, I have been able to work on a variety of projects that wouldn’t typically fall under one person’s job responsibilities. Each project has given me insight into what type of work I want to do in my future and made me realize that although I would prefer to work in education abroad, I am now also open to and enjoy working in international student and scholar services. Whereas before I only wanted to work in education abroad, I can now broaden the scope of my job search and better identify positions that I will thrive in based on my first-hand experience with job responsibilities and work environments.

 

Friday, May 12th, 2017

Register for Professional Development Weekend Workshops offered in Fall 2017.

Every semester we offer weekend workshops to our graduate students on a wide variety of topics from Development Practice and Policy, Intercultural Competence, International Education Management,  and Nonproliferation & Terrorism Studies.

The Professional Development Weekend Workshops are also open to interested professionals, community members, and students and faculty from other institutions. Access the Fall 2017 workshop listing. For inquiries, please contact: professional.dev@miis.edu.

Apply for a weekend workshop.

Search weekend workshop descriptions in our course catalog.

 

http://www.miis.edu/academics/short/executive-education/options/weekend-workshops

Friday, May 12th, 2017

Addy’s experience as United Nations Intern in Lima

Addy Michelle Jimenez Haga, IPD

United Nations Centre for Peace, Disarmament, and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean, Peru

January 2nd to June 31st, 2017

Summary of Experience:

Throughout my internship with the United Nations (UN), I have been given the privilege to learn about administrative mannerisms, arms trafficking, forensic ballistics, Resolution 1540, the missing links within the private security sector, and life cycle of its projects, how the UN executes grant writing and much more. I have been able to integrate into an 8-5 job, where I work mostly alone, and where I have developed my own due dates; this has been a change from the intense, rich feedback and team oriented culture at MIIS. However, it has been an enriching experience, and extremely conducive towards seamlessly introducing me to the paying-professional world after I honorably receive my Master’s degree from MIIS.

UNLIREC asked me to keep my blog discrete, which motivated me to be more involved and creative within my in Lima. From the congested city, endless honking, foul smells, to the loving people, kind souls, and delectable food, all whilst enduring stomach infections throughout. This opportunity has tested my resilience and has shown me that I am much more capable, patient, smarter and stronger than I thought.

Thank you for contributing towards this internship in Lima, Peru. I was once told in Peace Corps to represent America as if I was an ambassador each and every day; I have taken this mentality with me everywhere I go. With this said, I am honored to represent MIIS, and am working as hard as possible, being as innovative as possible, and being as positive as possible, to leave the Mafia footprint in Lima.

Read Addy’s blog

 

Thursday, May 4th, 2017

Application for Student Art Exhibition

If you have any art project that you would like to share with Committee on Art in Public Places (CAPP) or want to organize an art exhibition on campus, please submit Arts Project ProposalFor more details click here.

Monday, May 1st, 2017

How My DPMI Plus Experience Paid Off More Than I Ever Expected

Sarah Terherst completed DPMI Plus in the Spring of 2017. She is currently working as the Field Program Coordinator for the Resilience and Economic Growth in the Sahel – Accelerated Growth projected based in Niamey, Niger.

I’m one of those weirdos who has known what they wanted to do for a long time. I wanted to work in “development” before I ever knew it was an actual sector. When I was very young I lived in Togo and saw extreme poverty and subsistence farming first hand. Since then I’ve wanted to work in what I used to call “sustainable agriculture” which is now coined as “improved livelihoods” and “resilience.” When I joined MIIS I believed it would be the tipping point of my career, tying together all of my past experiences and launching me into my desired future career: program manager, in the field, somewhere in Africa, working on food security. So, naturally, I jumped at my first opportunity to take DPMI which then propelled me into the DPMI+ program.

 

I strongly believe that one of the best things that MIIS has to offer is the Career and Advising Center (CACS) and my journey here is a testament to that. When applying for my DPMI+, I reached out to my favorite professors as well as Gael and Scott at CACS and applied to over 30 positions. Scott spent a lot of time with me, explaining how food security projects worked overseas and told me about certain organizations who implement USAID-funded projects. He even reached out to some of his contacts on my behalf which led to an interview for the Livestock and Market Development Internship position at Cultivating New Frontiers in Agriculture (CNFA). I was offered the internship and headed out to Washington D.C. shortly after the new year. Just three months after I started my internship I became a full time employee for CNFA working on a different project. I am now a Field Program Coordinator for the Resilience and Economic Growth in the Sahel – Accelerated Growth (REGIS-AG) project based in Niamey, Niger.

 

For me, my DPMI+ experience led me exactly toward my career goals. And, I’m incredibly grateful to still have access to resources like Beryl, Scott, and Gael as I start a new role in a new place. As I’m given new tasks or come across challenges within the project, it’s great to have their insight and guidance at my fingertips.

 

I think my biggest advice to students considering DPMI+ would be two-fold. First, if you want to work in development definitely take DPMI. Understanding how development projects work; how they are designed, implemented, scaled, and how impact is measured is ESSENTIAL and gives you a great framework to work from. Second, while you are applying for your DPMI+ assignments only apply to organizations where you want to work. Don’t look at your DPMI+ as just another way to get more experience that you hope someday will matter to a recruiter.  Search for internships and opportunities that are actually in the sector and/or role you want to be working in. Pursue your career through DPMI+. I’m not gonna lie…internships are not glamorous…at my internship in D.C. I emptied and loaded dishwashers daily. But, at the same time and in the same role, I learned how USAID-funded projects operate, I gained a wealth of knowledge about livestock and agricultural projects, and I landed a full time gig.

 

I have in no away arrived. I feel more like I’m starting over. I’m in a new country, working on a new project, and speaking in a different language. I think the picture here is a perfect summary of my time so far in the field. Notice: the other two women beside me are not hysterically laughing. That is because they actually know what’s going on around them…they know exactly which appropriate customs should take place at this baptism and they completely understand the French as well as both local languages being spoken around them. Meanwhile, I’m just cracking up having a good ol’ time while I blunder through my time here. It’s a blast and I’m loving every minute.

Thursday, April 20th, 2017

IEM Symposium April 27th!

Hey all! Next week is Symposium! Come out (or log on to Zoom) and support current practicum students in the 8-10am and 4-6pm sessions, as well as those in the 12-2pm session presenting on NAFSA Advocacy Day, Team Spain, CIES and Diversity Abroad!

To log-on via Zoom (no download required), please visit http://go.miis.edu/iemsymp2017

Tuesday, April 18th, 2017

Social Impact Management Workshop and Internship in Colombia with Fundacion E2E

TALLER PARA LA GESTIÓN DE IMPACTO SOCIAL (TGIS) TGIS is a competitive international program in Medellín, Colombia for current and aspiring social impact practitioners on project design and management, impact measurement, and organizational sustainability. Participants collaborate with Colombian and international students, professionals, and community leaders to solve real issues using cutting-edge tools. TGIS is an unparalleled experience in a collaborative classroom environment where participants learn methods they can apply directly in their work. The program also offers MIIS students the opportunity for a 12-week internship in conjunction with the course, with placements across Colombia. The TGIS curriculum is created in cooperation with the Program on Design, Partnering, Management and Innovation (DPMI).

To learn more and apply, visit: http://fundacione2e.org/en_US/tgis-application/

TGIS June Flyer MIIS (1)

Friday, April 14th, 2017

Call Out for Community Stories !!

Have you made a connection with the local Monterey Community during your time at MIIS? If you have, please do share your stories with us. We will feature you and your partnership with the community. BE PART OF A PHOTO ESSAY showing MIIS & Monterey Community Partnership. Your stories will be developed as photo exhibit that will be displayed on MIIS Campus, Monterey Museum of Arts, and local city halls.

Send us an email if you want to be part of the project or want to nominate someone for the project at immersive@miis.edu 

Deadline: April 21, 2017

Friday, April 14th, 2017

Thinking of connecting locally over the summer?

Please check out the Community Collaboration Lab page and Explore the Past, Present and Future of Collaborative Learning. MIIS and California State University at Monterey Bay (CSUMB) have been collaborating on a project called Community CollaborationLab (CoLab). The underlying question being explored is: How might we have more meaningful, long-term engagements with community organizations that we partner with? This includes student, faculty and staff projects, practica and research. In an effort to collect and share historical data, Immersive Learning has been capturing a range of information on collaborative learning with the local community and surrounding areas. The list of the local partner organizations are listed on our database, if you exploring organizations for summer internships in Monterey County.

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