Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

GSIPM Dean’s Seminar Series with Professor Beryl Levinger

Beryl

Participation: Guiding Value or Empty Buzzword?

During Professor Levinger’s recent sabbatical, she worked with 14 international organizations in 16 different contexts and countries. The one thread that bound this set of amazingly diverse experiences together is that each organization claimed to embrace participation as a value that guided their work. Her talk will explore the very diverse meanings that organizations attach to the term “participation,” and what this means for the future of development work.

All are welcome.

When: Tuesday, September 30, 2014 from 12:15 – 1:45 PM

Where: McGowan 100

 

Friday, September 12th, 2014

What if your DPMI Plus Assignment was the PEACE CORPS?

michelle in nica

 

Michelle Zaragoza, IEP, left the United States to begin her Peace Corps service as an Environmental Education Promoter in Nicaragua last month. What follows is an excerpt from her blog: “My Journey as a Peace Corps Master’s International Volunteer”

How it all began (152 days til departure):

 

March 5th: Just another regular Wednesday morning. I was pacing my living room anxious about the phone call I was about to make to my Peace Corps recruiter. Not having heard from them in more than two months I was more worried than excited.


First try went to voice mail and I thought I would just try tomorrow…I called again and she picked up on the first ring. She started some small talk, and asked what I was up to in my life. The whole time I was hoping she would just get to the point and tell me what ever bad news she had. She asked about the research I was doing in school and I gave her a 30 second description of my Fulbright proposal for an environmental education study in Nicaragua. She laughed…why was she laughing!? After what seemed like for ever she says, “Well we have a slight problem”…here it was! 


She says, “I know we had originally told you you’d leave in September but that has changed. Could you leave earlier?”


Confused I said yes, although a little worried about how much earlier that meant. And she says, “We think you would be perfect for our Environmental Science Education program in Nicaragua that leaves in Aug…” YES!!!! YES and YES. I may have yelled yes about five times into her poor ear! After waiting ten months since I first sent in my application I was being extended an invitation to my top choice! 

Read more

 

Monday, September 8th, 2014

DPMI Kenya – Reflections from Abroad

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- Blog contributed by Maritza Munzon, MPA/IEM ‘15 

I was in Kenya a total of two months; at the time it felt longer, maybe because it’s a slower pace of life in Kisumu, or maybe because compared to a year at MIIS anything else seems to go at a snail’s pace. Whichever the case, slow was nice and much needed. Now looking back it seems like it all went by in a blur, I can’t believe how much I saw and experienced in two short months, while still having time to cook, read for fun and watch the World Cup every night! The DPMI training was intense of course, but nothing short of what is to be expected from a MIIS workshop, except that it was longer (10 days). This meant 8 hours a day of group work, charting, mapping, learning new tools and immediately applying them. We mostly failed at implementing the tools properly, but a great deal was learned from correcting our mistakes. I can now say that I am no expert at program design, but I know how to tackle the task of designing a program.

maritza obama grandparentsOur guide/mentor/program liaison, Rose Waringa, is a multitasking superwomen, she did a great job of taking care of us in and out of Kisumu. On the weekends we were taken to explore the local sites, it was great to get out of Kisumu and leave the books behind for a bit. There is LOTS of natural beauty near town and I feel fortunate to have taken a walk through Kakamega Forest, taken a boat ride on the biggest lake in the world (Lake Victoria) and visited President Obama’s paternal grandmother! Never thought I’d get to do any of it, let alone the last part!

Click here to read more

Friday, September 5th, 2014

On-Campus Speaker: Social Impact Investor & Venture Philanthropist Bud Colligan

When:  Thursday, September 18th at 12:15-1:30

Where: Irvine Auditorium

Bud C

The NetImpact Club and the MBA Student Association will co-host an on-campus presentation of Social Impact Investor & Venture Philanthropist, Bud Colligan.

John C. “Bud” Colligan is a forward-thinking community activist, social entrepreneur, investor and company builder. Bud is co-founder of Pacific Community Ventures, a non-profit community-development organization, partner at Accel Partners, a global venture capital firm, former Chairman and CEO of Macromedia, a multimedia software company, and the founder and CEO of South Swell Ventures, a private investment firm.

The MIIS community is warmly invited to attend Bud’s talk on the 18th in which he will be examining the relationship between for-profit and non-profit activity.

Bud will discuss social impact investing and explore the question:

“How do we do the most good in society?”

 

Want to learn more about opportunities in Social Entrepreneurship and Impact Investing at MIIS? Visit go.miis.edu/csil

Wednesday, August 27th, 2014

TEAM PERU: Is it right for YOU?

 

The Who, What, When, Where, Why & How!
TeamPeru_201415 copy

Monday, August 25th, 2014

Research Fellowship with Institute for Economics & Peace

Economics and Peace

The Institute for Economics and Peace is searching for a full-time Research Fellow to join their research team at their headquarters in Sydney,  Australia. Click here to download full position description. 

A Research Fellow will conduct research on topics related to the Global Peace Index, peace economics, development studies and peace and conflict studies.

Application Deadline: August 28th, 2014

Selection Criteria: 

1. Master’s degree (PhD an advantage) in a combination of economics and/or statistics, international
relations or other social sciences discipline.
2. Minimum of three to five years professional experience conducting empirical research and
quantitative data analysis specifically related to a combination of social sciences, development
studies, economics, statistics and peace and conflict studies.
3. Experience working with governmental and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) on peace
economics, peace and conflict studies, and international development issues.
4. Experience handling large datasets and knowledge of R, SPSS, STATA, and other related econometric
packages is required. Ability to write code for R, SPSS or STATA and advanced Microsoft Excel skills.
5. Track record of demonstrable analytical and data visualisation skills.
6. Excellent verbal and written communication skills. Competence to undertake research assignments
and project manage teams with minimal supervision.

Applications to: CV and cover letter addressing the selection criteria and desired personal qualities to Lucie
Paleckova on info@economicsandpeace.org
Deadline for applications: 28 August, 2014
Website: www.economicsandpeace.org, www.visionofhumanity.org

Friday, August 22nd, 2014

Reflection Post IPSS Placement Presentations

On Tuesday August 19, the 2014 cohort of the International Professional Service Semester (IPSS) program conducted their placement presentations of their semester-long experience in front of a select group of faculty and staff. As Graduate Assistant for GSIPM Immersive Learning and Special Programs, I took an active role behind the scenes, taking on the logistics to ensure that each of the Fellows were able to connect to the designated conference rooms where an anxious audience was expected to learn about their experience.

The task was challenging, as I had to make sure that all the technical details were taken care of for the 23 fellows to be able to connect smoothly from several countries and across several time zones. However, the job gave the unique opportunity to participate in the sessions and learn about the amazing work that each of the fellows has been doing at each of their placements for the past 3-6 months.

As a MIIS student accepted to IPSS for Spring 2015 and currently looking for placement opportunities, listening to the students’ presentations solidified the notion that doing IPSS in Spring 2015 is the right choice for my future, and here is why:

Firstly, I was impressed by the way that each of the fellows presented him or herself. They were all confident and used technical language that made them sound like real subject matter experts. For a bit it was hard to believe that just a few months ago they were just students in the classroom like me, because I would expect that such level of professionalism and technical expertise would only come from seasoned professionals. I know for fact, that those are skills that can’t be necessarily learned in a classroom, which to me was a statement of the value of IPSS as an immersive learning option.

Secondly, none of the fellows mentioned having regretted doing IPSS and all of them were visibly happy with the end results of their placements. Even though, there were some difficulties – which are all part of the professional growth process – all of the fellows managed to overcome them and make the most out of their experience. When asked by faculty about what they would have done differently, the overwhelming majority answered that early preparation is key and in terms of defining their role and specific tasks. I, of course, adopted that reflection as a recommendation that will be implementing in the upcoming months.

Finally, when asked about future plans, the majority of fellows responded that thanks to the IPSS experience they were able to ensure employment either at their host organizations or at another location that they were introduced to thanks to their IPSS placements. This statement adds value to the notion that immersive learning ensures a solid bridging between the academic and professional worlds, which is very unique to the MIIS experience.

My congratulations go to each of the 2014 IPSS fellows for their success and I thank you all for being such great role models.

 

JNoguera Photo

Julio Noguera is a Graduate Assistant for GSIPM Immersive Learning and Special Programs. At MIIS he is pursuing his MPA with a focus on Program Evaluation and Management. Before coming to MIIS, Julio spent 5 years in Washington, DC where he served as Junior Project Manager backstopping several multi-million dollar development projects in Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean and Asia. He received his BA in Economics, International Business and French from Westminster College in Missouri and participated in DPMI during the summer of 2007 as Davis UWC Fellow.

Thursday, August 21st, 2014

An Inside Look at Peace Trade and Development: “Innovative, Different and an Empowering Experience”

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As a summer graduate assistant at the Monterey Institute, my daily tasks range from marketing programs, providing logistical support and even learning to cook hot-dogs on charcoal at Del Monte Beach. However, the best part by far is being able to be a part of the institute’s many summer programs such as FMS, DPMI, and PTD, or Peace Trade and Development.  This summer I was lucky enough to actively participate on the many site visits with PTD.  I’m pleased to share stories from our fascinating excursions:

When asked to describe the Monterey Institute’s Peace Trade and Development program, Reed College graduate Shruti Korada could not have said it better when she remarked, “PTD has made development come alive for me.”

In this simple statement, Shruti made reference to her learning and experiencing of complex development topics in the most hands-on and real-life way possible. The program included class sessions taught by top-notch MIIS faculty and many immersive site visits on the Central Coast.

Alumni Joel Saldana commented that PTD teaches students how to, “One, identify what the global issues are today, and beyond Identifying, two is understanding what those issues are, and the third part of that is for those individuals to figure out how they can try to be a part of the solution to those problems.”

PTD students enjoy the natural beauty of Monterey at Point Lobos

Aside from the signature pedagogy in the classroom, the immersive excursions allowed the students to see peace, trade and development “come to life.”  They began their transformational journey learning about local and global development in Santa Cruz, where they visited the Homeless Garden Project and the Firelight Foundation.  After meeting with Global Supply Chain managers from Tesla Motors, they traveled on site to pitch a proposal about where should be the next source for lithium batteries.

After the visit, PTD Alum Jose Alvarez was most inspired by Tesla’s “drive for having no limits, literally. If somebody were to talk to me about going to the moon for lithium or washing away the whole oil industry, I’d probably laugh and walk away. When Tesla talks about that, though, you can’t help but to listen carefully and with all seriousness because you get this strange feeling that they actually could. Tesla embodies innovation. They’re the bold company the future needs for getting here.”

Salsabeel Khan described Tesla as, “an environment where even the sky isn’t the limit. Do you want to go to space? Go to space!”

PTD students present at Tesla Motors

The students also traveled to the Wells Fargo headquarters in San Francisco, where they met with MIIS alumni working in the Global Financial Crimes Intelligence department. Students learned how the department monitors financial transactions to prevent money laundering and corruption. Some students, such as Nyoma Clement were very intrigued by this field, and the visit helped them direct their career aspirations.

Clement remarked, “Actually my coming to MIIS has helped me reexamine myself as to what I need to learn in life. I have decided I wanted to do risk management. I really want to work in the area of regulatory compliance and managing political risk around the world and financial risk.  I want to study how risk can be used to help governments, NGOs and the corporate world in accomplishing the tasks they have set forth.”

The immersive site visits solidified and transformed the career goals for many by allowing the students to speak with the professionals in the field.  However, not only did they learn from the professionals in the field, as well as the expert MIIS faculty, but they learned immensely from each other. Just by sharing car rides, lunches and occasional trips to salsa dancing, I could tell how much the students had inspired one other.  Their interests in the complex development topics were expanded and defined.  To sum it up in four words, Jose Alvarez describes PTD as “innovative, different and an empowering experience.”  

Learn more about PTD at   go.miis.edu/ptd

About the author:

Cara for Blog!

Cara Hagan is pursuing her MBA at the Monterey Institute with a focus on the role of Sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility within Supply Chains.  She has interned for a host of non-profits, working primarily on economic development and workers’ rights in Latin America.  She received her BA from Otterbein University where she studied in Alicante, Spain and Valdivia, Chile. Cara aspires to have a career in which she can positively impact supply chains, especially focusing on the lack of human rights in the garment industry. 

 

 

 

Thursday, August 21st, 2014

GSIPM Welcomes New Interim Dean – Jeff Dayton-Johnson

 

As a GA in the GSIPM office, I like to try and stay in-the-know about what’s going on in my department and around campus.

As it turns out, fall 2014 will usher in some changes. Yuwei Shi will begin to turn his attention to the new Center for Social Impact Learning (CSIL), and teaching in the MBA program. As the founding dean of GSIPM, Yuwei Shi has shaped the Institute in significant ways, helping meld the separate policy and business schools into one school (GSIPM) in 2009. He will officially step down at the end of December, and in the meantime Jeff will serve concurrently, and then continue as interim dean from January 1 through June 30, 2015.

I had a chance to sit down with Jeff recently to chat about what’s going on, and what this means for us students.

During fall semester, he’ll be a busy guy – still chairing the IPS department and teaching classes in addition to job shadowing the current dean. He feels pretty fortunate for the overlap, and is looking forward to “learning what the rules of the game are,” getting to know colleagues from other parts of campus.

I asked him if he’ll continue teaching in the spring and he mentioned that none of the deans currently teach any classes. So if you haven’t had a class with Jeff yet – get in on one this semester before he’s off the market! There’s also a chance he’ll teach a J-Term class or two, but nothing’s been decided for sure.

What new policies or priorities is the interim dean eager to tackle first? He says he’ll be pushing for the immersive learning programs. “We have an exciting portfolio for students, and a lot of them are working really well,” he said. “DPMI and DPMI Plus are great examples. The challenge is the monetary one – it’s so exciting, but students ultimately opt out for financial reasons.” He also mentioned that sometimes students have trouble fitting them into their schedules or finding enough credits to participate. “If we really believe these are such valuable programs, we should find a way to make them more accessible.”

This is certainly something I can agree with, and I wish him the best of luck! President Ramaswamy encouraged Jeff to think long-term in regards to his new role, and reflect on what’s working well, and what could be replicated. If everything goes smoothly, Jeff will likely apply for the official position in the spring.

In the meantime, he says, “If anybody is reading this and has something to share, please come see me, or email me, I’d be happy to talk.”  jdaytonjohnson@miis.edu

You can also make an appointment through Lauren Patron-Castro, Dean’s Assistant:  lpatron@miis.edu

 

 

Faculty-Profile-Jeffrey-Dayton-Johnson   Jeff’s Bio:

As program chair of the International Policy Studies program, Jeff has been working with faculty, students, and staff to bring the IPS and MPA programs together within a larger, stronger and more focused program in Development Practice and Policy.  As one of the architects of a major piece of curricular reform, he is well positioned to lead and oversee the implementation of new and revitalized programs.

Jeff came to MIIS in 2011, following seven years as a senior economist at the OECD in Paris. At the OECD, Jeff was the first Head of the Americas Desk at the organization’s Development Centre; the Desk has now overseen the publication of seven annual Latin American Economic Outlook reports on topics ranging from international migration, to fiscal policy to the middle class. In Paris, Jeff built a team of 20 professionals, led policy relevant research and dialogue processes, interacted with policy makers and experts in Latin America and beyond, and oversaw fundraising efforts totaling millions of euros.

Jeff’s experience as a policy researcher, manager, and fundraiser in the hyper-politicized bureaucracy of an international organization provided him with a mix of soft skills and thick skin that will serve him well as dean in the comparatively upbeat realm of GSIPM.

Prior to moving to the OECD, Jeff was a tenured associate professor of economics and international development studies at Dalhousie University in Canada. At Dalhousie, he coordinated the university’s Master in Development Economics (MDE) program, which, much like many of GSIPM’s degree programs, trains professional policy analysts with a passion for global issues. Jeff earned a Ph.D. in economics at the University of California, Berkeley.

Monday, August 18th, 2014

Celebrating its First Decade, DPMI Goes through Renewal, Reinvention!

dpmi_kenya

At its core a cutting-edge institution, the unique, intensive, development-focused three-week Development Project Management Institute (DPMI) program seems ageless. Nonetheless, as “nae man can tether time or tide” (in the words of Robert Burns), 10 years have passed since its inception, and that is worth celebrating. “A decade of DPMI has produced over 1,000 alumni using their skills everywhere in the world,” remarks founder and fearless leader Professor Beryl Levinger.

This year also marks the change of the official name of the program from Development Project Management Institute to Design, Partnering, Management and Innovation – still DPMI! Levinger shares that the “process of renewal and reinvention means seeing ourselves not only as responders to international development trends, but also shapers of them.”

The DPMI alumni network is vibrant, diverse, and a source of wonderful social capital for past, present, and future program participants, says Levinger, noting also that there is “nothing more rewarding than seeing a DPMI team in action responding to a development challenge by drawing on culturally diverse perspectives, deep social interaction, and a rich toolbox of tools and approaches.” Apart from Monterey and Washington D.C., the program has been offered in Ecuador, Egypt, Rwanda, and beginning this year, in Kenya.

DPMI alumni are encouraged to share their stories on the anniversary website found at go.miis.edu/dpmi.

 

Friday, August 15th, 2014

USAID Releases guide to Strengthening Civil Society Through Social Media

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Social Networking: A Guide to Strengthening Civil Society through Social Media has been developed as a reference guide for civil society organizations (CSOs) working in partnership with the U.S. Agency for International Development and its implementing partners in advancing their critical missions. In line with the USAID Strategy on Democracy, Human Rights and Governance (June 2013), this manual is designed as a blueprint for CSOs to:

• Integrate and use technology to promote democracy, human rights and governance;
• Utilize social media to support greater citizen participation and transparent political
processes; and
• Strengthen mutual accountability among CSOs, government institutions and
citizens by creating real-time and direct interaction and organizing.

Social media operations are most effective when they are strategically incorporated as part of an organization’s outreach, program design and implementation, and monitoring and evaluation efforts. With this in mind, the guide is intended as a local capacity building tool to strengthen the ability of entire organizations, their staff and members to deliver greater impact. This guide (Version 1, 2014), presents an overview of the most widely-used and accessible

social media tools. Future manuals will capture developments in the social media.

Social Networking: A Guide to Strengthening Civil Society through Social Media includes interactive features such
as links to multimedia content, websites and workouts to help civil society organizations engage and share information.
View the flipbook and download a PDF version at www.usaid.gov/SMGuide4CSO.  Use #SMGuide4

Wednesday, August 13th, 2014

How do MIIS students feel about the future?

IPS Student at MIIS and GSIPM Front Desk Extraordinaire

IPS Student at MIIS and GSIPM Front Desk Extraordinaire

Be the solution…now, that is a daunting idea. So, where do we start at MIIS given that this is our core goal? Here’s an idea, let’s start by asking ourselves who we are as people and what motivates us to act.  I’ll begin by sharing  my latest inspiration in honor of the United Nations International Day of Youth – please chime in with your comments below! 

Youth, Optimism and Peace

Young people living in less peaceful countries tend to be far more optimistic about the state of the future than their pessimistic peers living in more peaceful countries.

Originally published by Vision of Humanity on 12 Aug 2014

As the world celebrates the International Day of Youth, we ask how the 1.8 billion young people around the world feel about the future, and what this means for peace.

Using our own measures of internal peace and comparing them to qualitative data on levels of optimism and pessimism about the future, we were able to determine if levels of peace in a society impact on the optimism of the youth. The results might surprise you…

OPTIMISM, YOUTH AND PEACE

From a range of survey data is seems that young people living in countries with low levels of peace are, on average, pretty optimistic about the future.

While this may be surprising as those living in less peaceful countries tend to face greater barriers to development and often have less opportunities, their optimism about the future is promising, as future leaders this is the kind of thinking we like to see.

Not only that, but optimism is a key ingredient in the recipe for high levels of human capital, meaning it is one of the essential stepping stones on the path to a more peaceful future.

IEP estimates that 86% of the youth living in less peaceful countries (purple) are optimistic about the future, compared to 50% in relatively peaceful countries (yellow). Additionally, only 1% of people in low peace countries are pessimistic about the future, compared to 7% in high peace countries (see image below).

PESSIMISM AND PEACE

On the flip side we see that young people living in peaceful countries are more pessimistic about the future.

Having said this, it’s not all doom and gloom for those fortunate enough to live in peaceful countries.

In fact, if we look at relative response rates we can see that optimism across the board is about 10 times more prevalent than pessimism.

SO WHAT CAN WE DO?

If you are living in a peaceful country then…  brighten up! Yes you have a long way to go in creating a more peaceful world, and better life for yourself than the generation that proceeds you, but you also need to recognise that living in a peaceful country gives you access to a lot more opportunities.

Living in a not so peaceful country? Explore what makes a society peaceful and take a look around your local community to see what can be done at the grassroots level to start creating a more peaceful and prosperous future for you and the generations to come.

– Published by Vision of Humanity – http://www.visionofhumanity.org/#page/news/1067

Do you have any opinions or inspirations you’d like to share with the GSIPM team? We’d love to hear from you, please email us at gsipm@miis.edu. Thanks!

Friday, August 8th, 2014

Job Openings in Policy Research and Data Analysis

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Policy Studies, Research Associate

Open Society Foundations

Open Data Analyst

Research Associate in Policy Studies, Kroc Institute, University of Notre Dame

The Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame seeks applications for the position of Research Associate in Policy Studies.  The Research Associate will work closely with the Director of Policy Studies at the Kroc Institute on research projects, curriculum development, and organizing research and education events both at Notre Dame and elsewhere.

Application deadline: August 8th

Open Data Analyst, Open Society Foundations, London or New York

The CODEX program seeks to leverage a wide range of open (and sometimes not-so-open) information relating to the extraction of oil, gas, and mineral resources in developing countries. The purpose of the work is to demonstrate, using innovative techniques and creative approaches to data-storytelling, how open data can be a powerful tool in the fight against mismanagement and plunder of natural resource wealth in the world’s poorest countries. This work would constitute a contribution to the growing field of “Open Government.”

Application deadline: August 17th

Monday, August 4th, 2014

Courage Under Fire: An Intimate Look at UN Peacekeeping

UNA-USA – Nationwide conference call on Wednesday, August 6 at 2 p.m. ET

with

Ken Payumo
Chief of the Peacekeeping Operations Support Section for the Department of Safety and Security, United Nations

Wednesday, August 6, 2 p.m. ET

U.S./Canada Dial-in: 866-454-4208
Passcode: 8136862

Please RSVP via email to membership@unausa.org.

What do you do when you are up against a government trying to harm its own people? As men with guns tried to enter the UN camp in Bor, South Sudan, Ken Payumo, a civilian officer in charge, stood up to the South Sudanese military when 12,000 refugees fled to the UN base for safety. His brave actions are thought to have saved thousands of lives.

Join us for a conversation with Mr. Payumo, who will provide a closer look at the day-to-day challenges of UN peacekeeping and give an update on the current crisis in South Sudan.

About our speaker:

Ken Payumo is currently the Chief of the Peacekeeping Operations Support Section for the Department of Safety and Security. This section is responsible for overseeing the security of all UN peacekeeping missions. Having more than 14 years of experience in the United Nations, Mr. Payumo’s UN service includes that of Legal and Policy Advisor, United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor (UNTAET); Political Officer, Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO)/Asia Middle East Division (AMED); Mission Management Officer (DPKO Police Division), and most recently Head of Office for Unity and later Jonglei states, United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS).

Prior to the UN, Mr. Payumo had served as a police officer in the New York City Police Department. Mr. Payumo is a citizen of the United States of America and was born in New York City.

-Text taken directly from e-mail from UNA-USA Membership membership@unausa.org

 

 

Thursday, July 31st, 2014

MIIS Resource Centers and Initiatives: A world of possibilities just around the corner from you!

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Alex Amling during IPSS in Cambodia

The concept of Immersive Learning is a significant component of the MIIS experience. Every student is encouraged to take advantage of the many venues available to expand his/her skills and knowledge beyond the classroom setting. Luckily, students do not need to look too far, as the Monterey Institute is home to an important number of research centers and initiatives available for students to explore innovative and original approaches to pressing global issues.

From the possibility of participating in relevant internships and fellowships, to the opportunity to conduct further research and the chance to be published in scholarly journals, faculty and staff at each of the eight research centers and initiatives are available to supplement the students’ learning process, by exposing them to specialized resources and tools.

  • The Center for the Blue Economy (CBE) explores the economic contributions of the oceans and coasts to human welfare, as well as the current economic drivers that undermine ocean health.
  • The Center for Conflict Studies (CCS) develops programs and publications contributing to the exploration of conflict, from understanding its causes to developing tools and skills to resolve conflicts in a non-violent manner.
  • The Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS) sponsors research, seminars and lectures relating to contemporary issues pertaining to the region of East Asia (China, Japan, North Korea, South Korea, Mongolia and Taiwan).
  • The Center for Social Impact Learning (CSIL), the newest research center on campus, provides programs for budding social entrepreneurs and conducts research on management issues in social ventures and impact investing.
  • The James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) is the largest nongovernmental organization in the world devoted to curbing the spread of weapons of mass destruction, and is the only organization dedicated exclusively to graduate education and research on nonproliferation issues.
  • The Mixed-Methods Evaluation, Training and Analysis Laboratory (META Lab) aims to capitalize on the flourishing importance of data-science as a discipline, and the rising demand for evidence-based policy evaluation.
  • The Monterey Cyber Security Initiative (MCySec) addresses the impact of the information age on security, peace and communication through multidisciplinary research, key-leader engagements and public-private partnerships.
  • The Monterey Terrorism Research and Education Program (MonTREP) conducts in-depth scholarly research, assesses policy options, and engages in public education on issues relating to terrorism and counterterrorism, extremist groups, regional studies of terrorism, and related aspects of international and homeland security.

 

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014

U.S. TIP Grant Solicitation for research on Trafficking in Persons

 

Email from TIP Office Public Outreach [TIPOutreach@state.gov]USA

U.S. Department of State

Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons

 Competitive Grant Solicitation for Research on Trafficking in Persons in Supply Chains in Sub-Saharan Africa

The Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons announces an open competition for funding of one or more projects to answer the following research question:  How do supply chains that touch sub-Saharan Africa operate and intersect with trafficking in persons, and prevent trafficking in sub-Saharan Africa?

Using the results of this research question, the successful applicant will develop a highly detailed typology across sectors, commodities, regions or other subdivisions that become apparent during the research.  The goal of the research is to enable governments and businesses to identify risks and best practices of programs, policies, and laws to combat those risks.

The request for proposals is posted on www.grantsolutions.gov and www.grants.gov under funding opportunity number AT-ATC-14-009.  To be considered for funding, proposals must be submitted by Wednesday, August 27, 2014 at 5:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time.

U.S.-based and foreign non-profit organizations, for-profit organizations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), public international organizations (PIOs), and institutions of higher education are eligible to apply.

 

Tuesday, July 29th, 2014

Democracy Now! Interviews Monterey Institute GSIPM Student Amer Shurrab

Democracy Now! reporter Amy Goodman interviewed Monterey Institute MA International Policy Studies and MBA student Amer Shurrab yesterday.

The interview was titled “What Do Gazans Endure? A Palestinian Student Who Lost 2 Brothers, 4 Cousins Tells His Story“. Amer also earned a BA in Economics from Middlebury College and is a graduate of the Davis United World College of the Adriatic. He is from Khan Younis in the Gaza Strip.

Amer2

Tuesday, July 29th, 2014

Tesla Pitch Continued: Cobalt, Graphite and Lithium

Peace, Trade, and Development Students Visit Tesla

Peace, Trade, and Development Students Visit Tesla

Last week the Peace Trade and Development (PTD) students met with Tesla’s global trade team at the factory in Fremont. The students were there to offer their pitch to the Tesla Challenge which called for proposals on sourcing raw materials for the new Gigafactory. In addition to the pitch session, the students were treated to lunch and a VIP tour of the Tesla factory, an impressive and re-purposed building conveniently situated in a California Free Trade Zone. “I was treating the presentation like a final exam, but when it came time to present, I had realized that we were speaking to real individuals with genuine concerns about their long-term acquisition of critical minerals. This wasn’t a quiz–my team had done in-depth research, provided a reasonable strategy, and were ready to have a conversation about alternatives.” -  Shruti Korada, PTD summer 2014 student What was the best part of the Tesla challenge?  Well, that’s subjective but things definitely got intriguing when one team suggested sourcing Lithium from the moon and another proposed a corporate-backed coup d’etat… Learn more about the PTD program via: go.miis.edu/ptd.

Monday, July 28th, 2014

DPMI: A learning journey

Josh Fleming (MA IPS '15) participates in a facilitation exercise during the second week of DPMI Monterey this June.

Josh Fleming (MA IPS ’15) participates in a facilitation exercise during the second week of DPMI Monterey this June.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I had heard repeatedly on campus that DPMI (Design, Partnering, Management and Innovation) is one of the most useful courses you can take. I found this hard to believe at first, but now I agree. If you haven’t taken this leadership training in international development project management and social change then you should reconsider.

You will walk away from the DPMI training having learned some ground-breaking and ‘tried and true’ tools to solving your next problem, motivating your staff or making your next big partnership. Tools that break down these processes  into quantifiable, qualifiable methods to be used at a given moment or throughout the lifespan of a project.

If you are a non-profit guru, a development practitioner in training, or a social change maker then you will notice, quickly, that these tools and capacities that DPMI finds so important are actually pretty important. This is how USAID, and other major non-profit employers do it, and whether you like it or not USAID often sets the standard. Additionally, from the United Nations to grassroots organizations, from CSR departments to State department recruiters–most are looking for project management skills. DPMI fits them nicely into the longest three weeks of your life (Yes, I’ve thrown in a bit of sarcasm). It’s worth it though. I implore you to find one job posting that doesn’t ask for project management skills.

Click here to read more

Friday, July 25th, 2014

Incoming MPA Student Reaches-out to Faculty To Develop Ultimate International Development Summer Reading List!

The Ultimate MIIS Reading List

The Ultimate MIIS Reading List

Returning to school after some time away from academia is a precious challenge. However being in school is also a commodity. While most of my undergraduate peers are beginning their careers, perhaps even starting to put down roots, graduate students choose to go back to school in order to further their education and get closer to their career goals. As a recently accepted Master of Public Administration (MPA) student at the Monterey Institute of International Studies (MIIS), I understand the initial fears and concerns students may have upon starting a new program. It has been about four months since I received the good news and I have had plenty of time to determine how I feel about attending MIIS in the fall. Although I am overall excited and grateful, I am honestly a bit nervous. Seeing that my academic skills seemed rusty I took it upon myself to email the MPA program faculty requesting ideas, readings, books, articles, and any other resource I should look at before classes start in August. Unsurprisingly, the faculty was supportive and accommodating. The following is a list of 18 recommended readings from Monterey Institute MPA and MAIPS faculty:

  1. Take a look online at William Arrocha’s and Nuket Khardam’s syllabi for their development theory courses here at MIIS.
  2. Study and absorb UNDP’s concept of human development.
  3. Browse the last ten years of the World Bank’s World Development Report.
  4. The Anti-Politics Machine by James Ferguson
  5. Ideas for Development by Robert Chambers
  6. Provocations for Development by Robert Chambers
  7. The Honor Code by Kwame Appiah
  8. Capital by Thomas Piketty (Editor’s Note: The GSIPM Dean may take you out to lunch if you read every word of this 600-page monster!)
  9. The Tyranny of Experts by William Easterly
  10. Social Physics by Alex Pentland
  11. Humble Enquiry by Edgar Schein
  12. Power of Development by Jonathon Crush
  13. Thinking Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
  14. The Routes of Man by Ted Conover
  15. Why Nations Fail by Daren Acemoglu
  16. Encountering Development by Arturo Escobar
  17.  “Organizational Assessment: a Framework for Improving Performance” (Free book available here http://www.idrc.ca/openebooks/998-4/).
  18. To get more immersed in policy, review the articles in https://www.project-syndicate.org/ (This website publishes policy concerns and ideas of leading global thinkers and policymakers).

After taking a look at this list, it became apparent that in order to succeed at MIIS, students must be engaged and passionate about their programs. Without a passion and thirst for knowledge, completing a graduate degree program would be an insurmountable task. Incoming MIIS students may be a bit hesitant or nervous about the challenge ahead. Although these feelings are natural, it is necessary to rise above, be proactive and start to materialize your short and long-term goals. MIIS provides the resources and opportunities; it is up to us, the incoming graduate students to bring the passion and innovation. It is time to start preparing and planning for a bright future here at MIIS. About the Author: Chris Callaghan is an incoming Master of Public Administration (MPA) Candidate for the fall 2014 semester. He is a graduate of the University of California Santa Cruz.

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