Friday, April 22nd, 2016

IPSS Fellow Shen Li’s Interview with the WTO

Shen Li

2016 IPSS Fellow Shen Li is currently interning in the Market Access Division of the World Trade Organization.  The WTO recently interviewed Shen for its newsletter – you can read the interview below.

Where are you from, and what did you study before joining the WTO?

I am from Beijing.  I did my Bachelor’s degree in China where I studied French.  Then I went to the US to do a Master’s degree in International Policy Studies – Trade, Investment and Development – at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey.

One of the reasons I am here as an intern is to earn academic credits for my school project.  I applied for an internship at the WTO because I am studying trade.  Also as I have studied French, Geneva is the perfect place to practise it.

When did you apply for the internship?

I have been planning the internship for a long time.  I would say that the WTO has fascinated me ever since I started to study trade two years ago.  I have always wondered what it would be like to work here.  At university, we had an international trade negotiation class where we simulated negotiations in the Doha Round, imitating the way WTO negotiations take place.  Whenever we wanted to raise some points or ask questions, we would raise a nameplate to speak.  It is amazing to find it is exactly the same here.

I submitted my application last October and I was really surprised when I received the internship offer in December.  This is my very first experience of professional life so it is a great starting point.  I am really excited and grateful to have this opportunity to learn about trade issues, the needs of developing countries and the challenges facing international trade.

You have been working in the Market Access Division since 1 February.  What kind of work have you been doing?

I am mostly working on the Trade Facilitation Agreement with Sheri Rosenow.  Last week we organized a donor event, where donor countries and international organizations introduced their programmes for helping developing countries implement the Agreement.  Once the Agreement is implemented, the international trade is going to flow much more smoothly.  So I feel like I am making a real contribution to world trade.  It’s so exciting.

In March, we had a workshop to help participants gain a better understanding of the Agreement so that their governments can ratify it sooner rather than later.  I helped to prepare the presentation and facilitated the workshop with other members of the Trade Facilitation Agreement Facility team.

How have you found life at the WTO so far?

I really like the atmosphere here because people are very open to other cultures.  Everyone in the Market Access Division is really nice.  I am also so pleased that we have a Volleyball Club at the WTO because I really love playing volleyball.  It is quite relaxing to play a game after work.  I haven’t met all the interns yet but we do have lunch together and sometimes we meet in the atrium for a coffee break and to have a chat.  It is a really nice opportunity to get to know people.

Is it your first time in Switzerland?

No, this is my second time.  As I studied French for my Bachelor’s degree, I undertook an exchange programme in Paris.  As an exchange student, I had quite a lot of holiday so I took the opportunity to travel, including to Switzerland.  I used to think that everywhere in Switzerland would be very peaceful, like it is by the lake, but after moving here I realize it is much busier than I thought.

What have you done for fun in Geneva?

I have tried a relaxing picnic by the lake with some friends.  I’ve also been to the chocolate festival, which was very interesting.  We tasted all kinds of chocolates and bought many different varieties.  It was a good way to spend the weekend.  I like Geneva because it feels very familiar here, having already lived in France for a year.  So there are not too many culture shocks and that has helped me adjust more quickly than I did in the US.

Last question: what are your plans for the future?

I think after this I will go to the US to finish my school project and graduate.  After that, I haven’t given it a lot of thought but I would welcome any opportunities involving international trade.  An international organization would be perfect but the private sector could also be interesting.

Thursday, April 21st, 2016

Research Projects with the Raechel & Jackie Foundation

RJFThe Raechel & Jackie Foundation is looking for MIIS graduate students to work on:

A. RJF Fellowship Program Development
B. Water Resource Management Project
C. Program Monitoring & Evaluation

There is flexibility to work from Monterey, Santa Cruz, Nicaragua or a combination of the three. For students who are interested in spending part of the time in Nicaragua, there is potential for partial or full assistance to cover a homestay in one of the communities where we are working.

For more information and detailed job descriptions, click here.

If interested, join Executive Director Sooni Gillett at her information session on Thursday, April 28th at 12 pm in Morse B207.

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

DPMI+ Fellow Jeanine Willig on her experience at Social Impact

Jeanine Willig (far left), DPMI+ Fellow & IPS 2016 student

Organization:  Social Impact

Title: Performance Evaluation Intern

Location: Washington, D.C.

Social Impact contracts with lots of different organizations, mainly for performance and impact evaluation and capacity building.  As a Performance Evaluation Intern, Jeanine’s been working to support the impact evaluation team on Social Impact contracts with USAID.  Last month, Jeanine helped conduct a literature review for FHI360’s Rural Teacher Retention Program in Ghana.  She also worked on an impact evaluation of a WASHPlus project in three districts of Bangladesh that are highly impacted by climate change and experience constant flooding.  Jeanine loves the variety of projects she gets to work on at Social Impact and says she never gets bored.  “I have days where I look up and I haven’t noticed the time go by,” Jeanine says.  “It’s been a HUGE learning curve.  I can’t believe it’s been a month already.”

Jeanine has recently signed up to assist with the evaluation of a Millennium Challenge Corporation anti-corruption project in Honduras.  The goal of the project was to help the Honduran government meet anti-corruption standards in order to be eligible for funding for development.  The evaluation with which Jeanine will assist involves quantitative and qualitative methods to measure impact and entails a comprehensive 23 evaluation questions (typically impact evaluation involves three to six evaluation questions).

How did MIIS prepare you to succeed as a Performance Evaluation Intern at Social Impact?

Jeanine credits Beryl Levinger’s Program Evaluation class with preparing her most directly for her work with Social Impact, which so far involves heavy use of data-evaluation methods, understanding and analyzing qualitative data, and “really getting into the nitty-gritty.”  Another class that was particularly useful was Ed Laurance’s Intro to Human Security & Development.  The “on-time assignments” in this class gave her the skills to be able to research and sort through information rapidly and effectively.  When asked what advice she had for MIIS students interested in similar work, Jeanine recommended that all students take Data Analysis (she wishes that she had).  She also said, “Finance and budgeting is such a NEED in this industry.  People who currently do it are doing it because no one else can and they have just taught themselves.  Skills in finance or budgeting will make your job application stand out.”

Any other advice for current students?

Jeanine wants other MIIS students to keep in mind that “people will care about you and last minute stuff is okay.  When an advisor says that you’ll find a spot, have faith.  Having a good attitude about the job search is important.  You’ve got to keep it in perspective.  Keep your ears open – there are things out there you don’t know about and opportunities you can’t even imagine, so just keep an open mind.  There’s so much out there.”

Find out more…

You can read more about Jeanine’s experiences on her blog.

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

MBA Capstone Information Session

MBA Capstone Information Session – Tuesday April 19th, 12:15-1:30pm, MG100

Are you a current MBA, Joint MBA/IEP or Joint MBA/IPD degree candidate? Starting to think about your capstone experience next year? Wondering about how the various options work?

Please plan to join Assistant Dean/MBA Program Manager Toni Thomas for an MBA Capstone Information session. Learn the ins and outs, and timing for committing to your capstone project. All MBA candidates that will not have completed their capstone by end of spring 2016 term should plan to attend.

Thursday, March 31st, 2016

Reminder: Apply for DPMI+ for summer/fall 2016

DPMI+ Application Deadline

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

From MIIS to IPSS & Beyond

IAEA_Photo_Tom Gray

Thomas Gray, NPTS 2015

IPSS 2015: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

It’s always inspiring to speak with current IPSS fellows in the field, but I’m also curious about where students end up afterwards and how their IPSS experience fits into their longer term career path.  Thomas Gray, a 2015 IPSS fellow and former NPTS student currently working at the IAEA in Vienna, graciously agreed to share his experiences and speak about his path from MIIS to IPSS and beyond.

MIIS to IPSS

Tom came to Monterey after six and a half years in the U.S. Navy.  As an incoming NPTS student, Tom knew he wanted to do a professional internship and had hopes for the IAEA due to his interest in international nuclear safeguards.  The connections that the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies has with different international professional organizations and the history of MIIS interns at the IAEA were a large part of Tom’s motivation to attend MIIS.

Tom applied for an IPSS fellowship with the IAEA as a second year NPTS student.  Previously, the NPTS students from MIIS that had interned at the IAEA had all worked in the Office of Public Information.  However, the year Tom applied, a position in the Department of Safeguards was available– this was a stroke of luck for Tom, as it matched up with his interests even more.

IPSS and Beyond

After his four month IPSS fellowship at the IAEA, Tom began a yearlong graduate fellowship program in the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in Washington, D.C.  This is another opportunity frequently pursued by MIIS students: there are typically at least one or two former NPTS students per year.  During the NNSA fellowship, Tom found out about another fellowship newly established by the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation in honor of Dr. Ian Hutcheon, a scientist who worked for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.  This fellowship is a two-year assignment as a Junior Professional Officer in support of the IAEA’s  Division of Nuclear Security.  Tom was the first fellow selected – he decided to leave his fellowship with the NNSA a few months early in order to pursue this opportunity and go back to working with the IAEA.  When I spoke with him he had been on the job for a week and a half.

Current Work

Tom attributes his selection for his current fellowship in part to his previous experience at the IAEA, which also allowed him to hit the ground running upon his return.  Tom’s primary task at the moment is to help organize a conference that the IAEA is hosting at the end of 2016.  Right now is an important time for the IAEA’s Division of Nuclear Security.  Eight years ago, Obama announced the Prague Agenda, his plan to secure the world’s nuclear material from use in terrorism.  According to the plan, a nuclear security summit has been hosted every two years since.  The last summit is happening this month in D.C.  The IAEA has been identified as one of the institutions responsible for continuing the progress made over the last 8 years, and the conference Tom is organizing will set the tone for how the international community sees nuclear security continuing after the Obama Administration.

Tom’s Advice

For NPTS students, IPSS can be a strategic choice because NPTS is a field where you need connections…  you never know who will lead to a job.  The NPTS field can be a hard field to break into and a strong professional network is critical.  If you decide to do IPSS, Tom recommends setting your internship up for as long as possible.  The first few months at any job involve a steep learning curve; the more time you have at your internship, the more time you’ll have to apply what you learned in those first few months and the more time you’ll have to impress your new boss.

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

Snapshot of Alumna Lisa Brinton for The Califonian

The Californian interviewed Middlebury Institute of International Studies alumna Lisa Brinton for her new position as Senior Planner for the City of Salinas. Ms. Brinton holds a Master’s degree in Public Administration from MIIS and served for eight years as Community and Economic Services Manager for the City of Seaside before transitioning to her position with the City of Salinas. See the full interview here.

Wednesday, March 16th, 2016

IPSS fellow Danny Pavitt speaks about his work at Conservation International

Danny

IPD student and IPSS fellow Danny Pavitt is currently in the field working as an Environmental Peacebuilding Intern at Conservation International.  Conservation International (CI) has been around for 30 years and was established with a vision that included not only the conservation of nature, but also the well-being of humans in relation to nature.  As Danny puts it, the overarching mission of CI is to promote healthy ecosystems globally and improve human well-being (ensuring a healthy, productive planet for everybody).

At CI, Danny is one of four staff members working in the Peace and Development Partnerships department of the Policy Center.  Environmental peacebuilding is at the intersection of capacity development, conflict resolution, and environmental conservation.  One of the central goals of the Environmental Peacebuilding Department is to raise awareness about the interconnectedness of conservation and peacebuilding.  Environmental conservation is not impossible in conflict areas; you can actually use environmental peacebuilding to mitigate conflict.  Promoting healthy ecosystems and mitigating conflict are not mutually exclusive and in fact can work more effectively in tandem.

Danny is currently working with his team to develop a training manual for global field staff to help them better incorporate conflict-sensitive programming.  The manual will have about 10 modules that are all parts of environmental peacebuilding and will address questions such as: How can we analyze conflict that exists? and How can we tie in different parts of environmental peacebuilding?  So far, Danny has completed a Conflict Analysis Module.  This module is helps engage local stakeholders in a conversation in order to become as informed as possible about situations of conflict in a given area.  The idea is that if you understand the situation, conflict, root causes, and main players, you can implement sustainable conservation programs while being conflict-sensitive.

Danny describes his experience at CI as full of learning.  He notes that “it’s been really eye-opening to be in an organization that’s so well-established in what it does and in the field” and has enjoyed collaborating with people who are influential in the environmental conservation world.  Since starting at CI, Danny has realized how connected everything is: “It’s no longer just about environmental conservation – you can’t really think about environmental conservation without thinking about gender, equality, capacity development, infrastructural growth, the economy, international development…  These things are no longer separate for me and they never will be.”

Danny took a leap of faith after his first semester at MIIS and decided to enroll in the 2015 Summer Peacebuilding Program despite being totally new to the subject matter.  This experience opened his eyes to the opportunities out there surrounding environmental peacebuilding.  Some of the courses at MIIS that prepared him for his current work include Organizational Sustainability with Professor Ortiz and Human Security and Development with Professor Laurance.  Danny encourages current MIIS students to explore different and intriguing things they’re curious about but don’t necessarily have experience in (like the Summer Peacebuilding Program for him).  Danny got to his current position by really putting himself out there to explore and understand different parts of international development and to figure out what he didn’t want to do.  In his role now, he enjoys what he’s doing so much it doesn’t even feel like work.

For a glimpse into the work of Conservation International, check out their Nature is Speaking advertising campaign.

Friday, March 11th, 2016

IEP student Whitney Berry to present on behalf of the International Union for Conservation of Nature

geneva

This April, International Environmental Policy student and IPSS fellow Whitney Berry will be presenting at a Geneva workshop titled, “The Application of Genomic Tools for Benthic Monitoring of the Marine Environment: From Technology to Legal and Socio-Economical Aspects.”   She will be giving a presentation at the Natural History Museum in Geneva on behalf of the IUCN, the organization she is working with as an IPSS fellow.  The workshop is sponsored by the Swiss National Science Foundation and the University of Geneva.

More About the Workshop

Rapidly increasing impacts of industrial activities on marine biodiversity strongly affects marine ecosystem health and services. Yet, the growing demand for measuring and mitigating these impacts can hardly be satisfied by classical monitoring based on morphological species identification. New genomic tools based on analysis of environmental DNA (eDNA) could potentially overcome these limitations, but their application for biomonitoring is still very limited. The main objective of the workshop is to examine the effectiveness of eDNA method for seabed monitoring from ecological, legal and socio-economic perspectives. The workshop will discuss the need to modify regulatory requirements and legal instruments for incorporating eDNA data into biotic indices. The participants will also learn about the advantages and challenges of using the eDNA to explore biodiversity and valuing ecosystem services. The event will bring together molecular biologists, ecologists, environmental managers and policy makers interested in integrating genomic tools in environmental impact assessment of industrial activities in marine environment.

 

Check out Whitney’s blog for a firsthand account of her experiences as an IPSS fellow at the IUCN.

Thursday, March 10th, 2016

Reminder: Apply for IPSS 2017 by March 31st

IPSS 2017! (1)

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016

MIIS Cyber Initiative Faculty, Students Featured in Monterey County Weekly

The Monterey County Weekly recently published an article on the MIIS Cyber Initiative. Check it out here!

Thursday, February 25th, 2016

Bologna Symposium on Conflict Prevention, Resolution, and Reconciliation

Webpage-Block-Bologna-Symposium2013

Application Deadline: May 16, 2016

Symposium Dates: July 23-August 13

Location: Bologna, Italy

Description: New types of conflict challenge classic methods of conflict management and resolution. Collapsed and fragile states, autonomous networks of illegal activities, the speed of information, and extremist revolutionary movements are all part of the complex conflict kaleidoscope that must be addressed by the contemporary peacebuilder.

As a modern peace leader you will need a toolkit of essential practical skills, but also appropriate strategies based on a novel understanding of how civil society interacts with security reform, statebuilding, religious establishment, community, and bottom-up institutions. At the 2016 Bologna Symposium, you will go through an intensive training process with the field’s premier political leaders, academic experts, practitioners, and advocates who will challenge you to tackle this century’s most pressing issues.

As a participant, you receive an IPSI Post-Graduate Certificate in “International Conflict Management” upon successful completion of the course.  If you choose to undertake additional rigorous assignments you will earn an IPSI Post-Graduate Certificate in “International Conflict Management with Distinction.”  In addition, you may decide to apply to earn graduate-level MA course credit from The Johns Hopkins University Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), one of the world’s premier graduate schools for international affairs.

Eligibility: Conflict resolution professionals, peacebuilding practitioners, negotiation students, human rights advocates.  Those with stellar academic and/or professional achievement, proven interest in peace & security, a record of leadership positions in community affairs, experience in/with government agencies, military service, and/or demonstrated ability in undertaking social entrepreneurship ventures.

Scholarship: Partial financial aid for MIIS alumni and students (-500 USD)

Standard applicants will be informed of acceptance on a rolling basis, in most cases within two weeks of submitting their applications (acceptances are merit-based and spots are limited).

Fee / Costs: 4000 USD

How to apply: https://ipsinstitute.fluidreview.com/

Official Website: http://ipsinstitute.org/bologna-2016/

Contact: amartinez@ipsinstitute.org

 

Thursday, February 25th, 2016

IPSS Info Session

Interested in an International Professional Service Semester for spring 2017?  Not sure if you’re interested?  Come learn more about IPSS logistics, opportunities, and application deadlines at the info session on Thursday, March 3rd from 12 to 1 pm in Morse B105.  IEP, DPP, and NPTS students are eligible to apply.

IPSS Info Session (3)

Wednesday, February 24th, 2016

New Field Research Course in China

In this proposed course, students will conduct academic research to explore the topics of trade, diplomacy, and development in China.  The field research component of the course will run from June 7th to June 28th, 2016.  Students will have the option to stay in China for another two weeks if they wish to conduct more field research on their own.

More Details

During the spring 2016 semester, students from both MIIS and Middlebury will work with three professors to develop project ideas and to design appropriate research methodologies with assistance from the Meta Lab at MIIS.  In June, the group will travel to Beijing, where top scholars will workshop their research ideas.  The group will then travel to research sites in teams consisting of at least one professor and a team of MIIS and Middlebury students.  Interpreters from the MIIS Translation and Interpretation (T&I) program will travel with each team to assist with language.  At each site, the team will conduct fieldwork using the methodologies developed on campus.  Students will have the option of incorporating their original research into an independent study project or Master’s thesis upon their return to campus in fall 2016.

Requirements & Expectations

  • No language requirement, although some Mandarin would be helpful
  • Spring 2016: a two-hour/week independent study section with Professor Lewis (this doesn’t have to be for credit, but does require participation)

You Will Learn

  • Research design
  • Methodologies like surveys, interviews, statistical modeling, archival research, etc.
  • How to conduct research in the field, including adapting to field conditions and challenges
  • Chinese language skills (with help from the T&I students)
  • How to analyze the research you collect in the field
  • How to write academic articles for publication based on your fieldwork findings

Cost

The program cost of $2,000 will include instructions, guest lectures, lodging, 2 meals per day, and field trip bus rental. It does NOT include airfare to China, local transportation, domestic travel, dinners, visa fee, or additional costs for extended stay.

How to Apply

Interested students should submit an unofficial transcript, C.V. and a one-page essay explaining why you would like to take the course, your goals for the experience, and the particular strengths, interests, and experiences you would bring to the course.  Please submit the application materials to Professor Liang (wliang@miis.edu) by FEBRUARY 29th For additional information, please contact Professor Liang or Professor Lewis (olewis@middlebury.edu).

Monday, February 22nd, 2016

D.C. Online Summer Internship Fair

dc career fairDon’t miss your opportunity to participate in the 2016 Online DC Summer Internship Fair and connect directly with employers in government, public policy, international affairs, communications, and philanthropy. This event is great for those exploring opportunities in Washington DC.  The event will take place on March 1, 2016 12:00 PM to 3:00 PM Eastern Standard Time (EST).

Monday, February 22nd, 2016

Notable Conferences & Upcoming Events


conference pins
We wanted to make sure that you knew about these interesting conferences and events happening soon. They are all great opportunities for learning and networking. Please see the links and descriptions below. To those students interested, please apply for conference funding soon!

 

March 9-11, Confluence Philanthropy – Cambridge, MA

 

Confluence Philanthropy’s Annual Practitioners’ Gathering is a three-day conference for current members of the Practitioners’ and Advisors programs, prospective members, and invited guests. Confluence Practitioners are grantmakers practicing mission-aligned investing, also known as impact-investing. Advisors Members represent the top investment managers and advisors in impact-investing today. Attendees are committed to building the field through strategic thinking and collaboration. It is not intended to serve as a marketplace for impact-investing. Sessions are led by funder-practitioners, investment experts, and other thought leaders.


 

March 14, Women Effect Gathering – Boston, MA

 

Women Effect are co-hosting several events for members and prospective members.


 

March 23, RSF Community Reception – Washington, DC

 

You’re invited to join RSF for a fun and engaging evening in Washington, DC. Meet RSF staff, investors, borrowers, and others in the community while enjoying local fare and drinks at Union Kitchen: Ivy City. The reception follows a quarterly RSF Pricing Meeting. These meetings are an opportunity for representatives of all three stakeholders in the RSF Social Investment Fund—investors, borrowers, and RSF staff—to meet each other, discuss their needs and goals, and make recommendations for RSF’s next quarter interest rates. This will be a perfect opportunity to engage with our wider community.


 

March 30 – April 1, National Food Hub Conference – Atlanta, GA

 

This year the theme for the conference is “Maintaining Values While Building Value.”

Conference tracks include:

  • Mitigating Risk
  • Money: Financing and Finances
  • Maintaining Values
  • Growth and Efficiencies
  • Cutting Edge Hub Models
  • Core Hub Functions
  • Value Chain Facilitation / Value Chain Coordination

 

April 14-17, SVN Spring Conference – San Diego, CA

 

For 29-years, high-impact business leaders, social entrepreneurs and impact investors have convened at SVN conferences to have real conversations with values-aligned peers. Our unique conference experience creates a space where the true challenges of leading a mission-driven organization can be addressed, and where long-time SVN members and first-time attendees find the people, resources and ideas they need to succeed and grow.


 

April 14-17, True Cost of American Food – San Francisco, CA

 

This conference will bring together up to 700 leaders and interested citizens to address one of the most critical barriers currently preventing sustainable food systems becoming mainstream – the failure to recognize the true costs of producing food in different ways.


 

April 22: GWC Peace Conference – Huntington Beach, CA

 

The 2016 Peace Conference is a shared inquiry into a way of life that embodies underlying human values of compassion, care, generosity, and trust. Amid global challenges of the 21st century, the conference advocates that everyday people can redefine the narrative and recognize their vital role in shaping our world– simply by “being the change they wish to see” to create communities that are just, compassionate, and sustainable.


 

May 10-12: Mission Investors Exchange Conference – Baltimore, MD

 

The conference will be headlined by leading foundation presidents and CEOs, including Patrick McCarthy of the Annie E. Casey Foundation, Darren Walker of Ford Foundation, Clara Miller of Heron, Rip Rapson of  The Kresge Foundation, and Julia Stasch of The MacArthur Foundation. Seizing the Momentum is a call to action for the impact investing community to take advantage of the latest investment opportunities and innovations that can make real progress in solving intractable problems.

Wednesday, February 17th, 2016

Impact Investing for Global Sustainability

Are you interested in impact investing? Would you like to learn how it  can contribute to solving global sustainability problems? Come join us to hear Ricardo Bayon speak on how this can be done!
What: The Role of Impact Investing in Solving Global Sustainability Problems
When: February 24 6pm-7:30pm
Where: McGowan 102
Ricardo Bayon is a partner and a member of the Board of Directors of Encourage Capital. He leads the water team and new business and innovation at Encourage and works across several other investment sectors. He is a member of the Investment Committee of the EKO Green Carbon Fund. In addition, prior to co-founding EKO in 2007, Ricardo helped found and served as the Managing Director of the Ecosystem Marketplace, a website and information/analysis service covering the emerging environmental markets.
For more information about other speakers and events regarding sustainability please visit http://www.miis.edu/academics/programs/environmentalpolicy/speakers

Thursday, February 11th, 2016

MIIS Alum Julia Belliard Featured in “The Californian” Article

Julia Belliard MPA ’05 has become the a point person for human resources related information in the California agricultural sector through her position as executive director of the Agricultural Personnel Management Association (APMA).

Take a look at this article in which she shares her journey from Belarus to MIIS and beyond.

Tuesday, February 9th, 2016

Announcing Sarah Meek Travel Grant for Research in Africa

africa-151640_1280Up to four travel grants of $1,500 each will be awarded to MIIS students conducting research on social change in Africa. The research can be either independent or part of established immersive learning program such as IPSS, DPMI+ or Frontier Market Scouts. The research must be conducted in Africa for a duration of 3-4 months or more.

To receive this grant, students must submit a research design that focuses on a social condition in Africa of the applicant’s choosing; e.g., poverty, environment, crime, armed violence, gender equality, conflict, disease, education, refugees, etc., with the goal of making policy/program recommendations that can change that condition.

The application must include the following elements:

1)      A two-page statement that includes a complete research design, to include a preliminary literature review that shows a need for this research; the who, what, where, and how of the project and its potential impact on the social condition. A description of the deliverable and plan for presenting it back to the MIIS community should be included in this statement. A timeline and preliminary budget should be attached as separate documents.

2)      A letter of support from an organization which is hosting or assisting you with your project.

Send applications via email to Jennifer Hambleton-Holguin at  jhamblet@miis.edu by no later than March 1st. A committee of faculty judges will evaluate all applications and determine the recipients of the award by March 15th. Awards will be given as reimbursement for travel to Africa.

If you have any questions or wish to discuss the eligibility of your planned research for this award, please make an appointment with Jennifer via Zócalo. She can also forward a sample application from last year to those interested.

These awards are made possible by a continuing donation from the family of Sarah Meek, a MIIS alum of 1996 whose life was cut short while working to improve social conditions in Africa.

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Join Prof. Olsen for ‘Emerging Discipline of Impact Accounting and Management’

sara olsen

Are you interested in social impact, social investing, stakeholder assessment, and/or environmental impact assessment? Would you like to pursue a professional certification in ‘Introduction to Analysis of Social Impact’? Why not bolster your knowledge of these topics in a course taught by a leading professional in the field?

Join Professor Sara Olsen in the three credit course MBAG 8616 Emerging Discipline of Impact Accounting and Management. The course is open with no pre-requisites, and will be held on Wednesday evenings from 6:00-9:00pm throughout the entire term, starting February 10th.

The course will provide students with an overall framework within which to understand the social/environmental impact of any enterprise, and will then equip students with a practical toolkit. This toolkit can be applied to any entity to gauge its impact, and to manage impact as a strategic asset and/or risk factor.

In addition to other topics, Professor Olsen will cover content to prepare you to sit for an optional professional certification in ‘Introduction to Analysis of Social Impact’, awarded by Social Value International (SVI). Pursuing the optional certification requires an exam fee of $100.

Register for MBAG 8616 Emerging Discipline of Impact Accounting and Management today!

Next Page »