2018 TILM Career Fair

Every year, the Center for Advising and Career Services brings together a TILM Career Fair that hosts a wide range of translation, interpretation, and localization management employers.

The 2018 TILM Career Fair will be held on March 9, 2018, at the Monterey Marriott, San Carlos Ballroom.

Check out our schedule to see which information sessions are taking place during the month of the Fair!

2018 TILM Career Fair Exhibitors

We publish this partial list to facilitate early research by students. Employers are still signing up and we will continue to regularly update this list until the Career Fair.

AECOM

We are a global network of experts working with clients, communities and colleagues to develop and implement innovative solutions to the world’s most complex challenges. We connect expertise across services, markets, and geographies to deliver transformative outcomes. Worldwide, we design, build, finance, operate and manage projects and programs that unlock opportunities, protect our environment and improve people’s lives.

Recruiting for: Chinese, German, Korean, Portuguese, Russian
Current Opportunities: Russian Linguist – Cleared, Russian Linguist, German Linguist, Turkish Linguist, Italian Linguist, Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) Linguist – Cleared, MSA + French, MSA + Turkish Linguist – Cleared, Farsi Linguist – Cleared, Korean Linguist – Cleared, Chinese – Mandarin Linguist, and more.
Specialization: Translation, Interpretation

AIIC USA

International Association of Conference Interpreters (AIIC) is the benchmark for professionalism in conference interpreting. It is recognized by international organizations such as the UN and the EU, with which it has working agreements. AIIC brings together 3000 professional conference interpreters in more than 250 cities and over 90 countries.

Recruiting for: Not currently hiring, but advising T&I students of their career as conference interpreting and the path to becoming a member of AIIC.
Specialization: Interpretation

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)

The CIA is an independent agency responsible for providing national security intelligence to senior US policymakers. The Director of the Central Intelligence Agency (D/CIA) is nominated by the president with the advice and consent of the Senate. The Director manages the operations, personnel, and budget of the Central Intelligence Agency.

Recruiting for: Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Russian
Current Opportunities:
Operations Officer, Collection Management Officer, Staff Operations Officer, Targeting Officer, Language Officer, Open Source Officer, Foreign Language Instructor
Specialization: Translation, Interpretation, Localization, Localization Management

Certified Languages International

Certified Languages International (CLI) stands at the forefront of world-class interpreting services and has since its inception in 1996. Thousands of organizations across the country rely on CLI to help them communicate with a growing demographic of Limited English Proficient (LEP) speakers.

Recruiting for: Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish
Current Opportunities:
Work out of home interpreting positions for all languages
Specialization: Interpretation

CSOFT International

CSOFT International is a global communications firm that provides language solutions to leading enterprises around the world, from translation and multilingual localization services to branding and public relations strategies. Our goal? To make sure our clients are heard from every corner of the globe, in a way that resonates with each local market. We are seeking global citizens to help our clients deploy their products and services to new markets. If you are fanatical about client service, passionate about quality, highly motivated, and uber creative, then we invite you to become a part of our dynamic team.

Recruiting for: Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish
Current Opportunities: Project Managers, Project Coordinators, Business Development Manager, QA Specialists, Localization Engineers, Content Creation and Technical Writers
Specialization: 
Translation, Localization, Localization Management

Department of State, Office of Language Services, Interpreting Division

The Department of State’s Office of Language Services is responsible for providing foreign language interpreting (spoken) and translating (written) support for the State Department, the White House, and other federal agencies. We provide this support through a team of highly-skilled language professionals who specialize in interpreting and translating oral and written communication, respectively.

Hosting an information session

Recruiting for: Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Spanish
Current Opportunities:
Freelance contract interpreters and translators
Specialization: Translation, Interpretation

Donnelley Language Solutions

Donnelley Language Solutions is one of the largest linguistic service providers in the world. With our expansive resources, our clients enjoy end-to-end communication services on a global scale, creating, managing and distributing their content in any format, in over 140 languages. We understand that the quality of our people and linguists is the single most important asset for our business. Our employees and translators have the expertise to take on the most complex translation and linguistic projects, and the know-how to not only manage the job well, but to exceed expectations every time.

Recruiting for: Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish
Current Opportunities:
Project Coordinators/Managers, Interns – project management, Interns – technology, Quality Assurance Specialists, Localization Engineers
Specialization: Translation, Interpretation, Localization, Localization Management

DS-Interpretation, Inc.

Since 1972, DS-Interpretation, Inc. has specialized in Conference Interpretation Services. We believe that when it comes to live interpretation, the human element is essential. We use technology to help interpreters deliver their clients’ dynamic and critical message. Interpreters will not be replaced by technology. They will be replaced by interpreters who use technology.

Recruiting for: Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish
Current Opportunities:
Conference Interpreters (Simultaneous)
Specialization: Interpretation

eBay, Inc

Whether you are buying new or used, plain or luxurious, commonplace or rare, trendy or one-of-a-kind – if it exists in the world, it probably is for sale on eBay. Our mission is to be the world’s favorite destination for discovering great value and unique selection. We employ extraordinary people who do meaningful work that has a tangible impact on the lives of individuals all over the world. And we aspire to make extraordinary things possible for each other, for our customers, and for you.

Recruiting for: Chinese, Spanish
Current Opportunities:
Language specialist intern with mixed scope (regular translation + machine translation tasks)
Specialization: Translation, Localization, Localization Management

Facebook

Founded in 2004, Facebook’s mission is to give people the power to share and make the world more open and connected. People use Facebook to stay connected with friends and family, to discover what’s going on in the world, and to share and express what matters to them. Connecting people, building community and bringing the world closer together happens in real time. Our teams are small and nimble. We work quickly and collaboratively to build smarter, more meaningful solutions on a global scale.

Hosting an information session

Recruiting for: English
Current Opportunities:
Project management localization, Internationalization, Localization, Globalization
Specialization: Localization, Localization Management

Goken America

Headquartered in Dublin, Ohio, Goken America is an Engineering Services and Product Development company founded in 2004. At Goken America we strive to expand and deliver upon our company motto of “Creating Something Different”. We are continually striving to strengthen our organization, and are always seeking talented individuals who have a strong desire to work in an environment where they can make a difference. Our “Vision” is to empower our associates to affect change wherever change is needed. Our “Mission” is that in building trust we foster greatness is our people, excellence in our clients and impact in our communities.

Recruiting for: English, Japanese, Spanish
Current Opportunities:
Translator, Interpreters
Specialization: Translation, Interpretation

Honda Language Services, Inc

Honda Language Services, Inc employ full-time in-house interpreters/translators. We have been sending those professionals to Honda manufacturing plants and related companies in the United States. We are looking for people who are willing to relocate to Ohio, Alabama, South Carolina, Georgia or Indiana.

Recruiting for: Japanese
Current Opportunities:
Full / Part-time interpreters/translators
Specialization: Translation, Interpretation

Idem Translations, Inc.

Founded in 1983, Idem Translations, Inc. is a full-service provider of translation and localization services. Idem specializes in certified translations for medical device, biomedical, and pharmaceutical companies, as well as other organizations and entities working in the life sciences sector, such as contract research organizations (CROs), healthcare research centers, and institutional review boards (IRBs). The company is a WBENC-certified woman-owned business and holds certifications to ISO 9001:2015, ISO 13485:2003, and ISO 17100:2015.

Recruiting for: Not specified
Current Opportunities:
Project Manager, Project Management Intern (summer 2018)
Specialization: Localization Management

iinterpret, Inc.

Iinterpret is a full-service interpretation company that offers interpretation services in all major languages. We have built an excellent reputation as a reliable and responsive provider of interpretation services to a wide variety of corporate clients, medical institutions, and government agencies. Iinterpret has been delivering high-quality services since 1983. Based in the San Francisco Bay Area, we provide services to clients throughout the US and abroad.

Recruiting for: Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish
Current Opportunities:
Not specified
Specialization: Interpretation

Language on Demand

Language on Demand (LOD) is a language solution provider located in the Washington, D.C. metro area, offering linguistic support, American Sign Language (ASL), bilingual intelligence analyst staffing, and language/cultural training domestically and internationally for Federal and Commercial clients. A recipient of 8(a) small business of the year award by USDA, LOD’s key to success is meeting and exceeding client expectation one project at a time.

Recruiting for: German, Japanese, Korean, Russian
Current Opportunities:
Freelance translators/interpreters, Interns
Specialization: Translation, Interpretation, Localization

LanguageLine Solutions

With more than 35 years of experience, LanguageLine Solutions® is the trusted language services provider for more than 27,000 clients across the world.  We provide the highest quality phone, video, and on-site interpreting, document translation services, and localization, as well as bilingual staff and interpreter testing and training.  We deliver the industry’s fastest and most dependable access to highly trained and professional linguists in more than 240 languages 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, facilitating more than 33 million interactions a year; that’s a new connection every second!

Recruiting for: Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian
Current Opportunities:
OPI/ Video Interpreters and corporate positions
Specialization: Interpretation, Localization

Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford

Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford is the heart and soul of Stanford Children’s Health. Nationally ranked and internationally recognized, our 311-bed hospital is devoted entirely to pediatrics and obstetrics. Our six centers of excellence provide comprehensive services and deep expertise in key obstetric and pediatric areas: brain & behavior, cancer, heart, pregnancy & newborn, pulmonary and transplant. We also provide an additional, wide range of services for babies, kids, and pregnant moms.

Recruiting for: Chinese, Spanish
Current Opportunities:
Relief and Full-time interpreter positions in Mandarin/Cantonese, Spanish, Arabic
Specialization: Interpretation

Monterey Bay Internships

Monterey Bay Internships is a resource that helps ease the transition for young adults from higher education to the workforce. Employers can take advantage of the talent groomed here at home. Students receive the training necessary to meet the employment needs of our local business community. Together we can help our region thrive.

Recruiting for: English
Current Opportunities:
Various internships, all listed at www.mbinterns.org
Specialization:
Interpretation, Localization

Monterey Language Services

Monterey Language Services is an exciting, modern translation and interpretation company, assisting communication in the growing global environment and staying on the cutting edge of technology and industry trends. Monterey Language Services is committed to bridging the world’s languages by providing quality, professional, and efficient translation & interpretation services in over 175 languages. Our services include translation and interpretation of all types, as well as website and software localization. Our areas of specialization cover all major fields, including medical, legal, technical, and more.

Recruiting for: Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish
Current Opportunities:
Marketing Manager, Marketing Assistants, Project Management Assistants, Freelance Translators and Interpreters
Specialization:
Translation, Interpretation, Localization, Localization Management

Mount Sinai Health System

The Mount Sinai Health System provides compassionate patient care with seamless coordination and advanced medicine through unrivaled education, research, and outreach in the many diverse communities we serve. When you join us, you become part of Mount Sinai’s unrivaled record of achievement, education, and advancement as we revolutionize medicine together.

Hosting an information session

Recruiting for: Chinese, Spanish
Current Opportunities:
Mandarin interpreter, Spanish interpreter
Specialization:
Translation, Interpretation, Localization, Localization Management

Ortiz Schneider Interpreting & Translation

Ortiz Schneider Interpreting & Translation is based in Santa Barbara, California and provides certified and accredited interpreters in several language combinations. They provide on-site interpreting services to healthcare providers, government agencies, the workers’ compensation system, offices of law and private businesses. In addition to interpreting, Ortiz Schneider offers written translations in multiple languages regardless of location. Lastly, they also provide medical interpreter training for interested organizations.

Recruiting for: English, Spanish
Current Opportunities: Interpreter with translation a plus
Specialization: 
Translation, Interpretation, Localization, Localization Management

Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc.

Otsuka is a global pharmaceutical company originated from Japan. We value diversity, creativity and innovation with a goal of creating new products for better health worldwide. Our people are passionate about developing and delivering original products as part of a global holistic commitment to better health and well-being.

Recruiting for: Japanese
Current Opportunities:
Language Services Specialist (contractor) – utilizes linguistic/cultural expertise to help global Otsuka colleagues achieve business goals. About ninety percent of work is interpretation.
Specialization: Translation, Interpretation

Supertext USA, Inc

A creative copywriting and translation agency founded in 2005, Supertext ranked among the top 100 European technology start-ups as early as 2008. Today, more than 3500 companies order our creative language services online. Over the last 10 years, we’ve built a network of more than 900 selected copywriters, translators and proofreaders that get your message across. In more than 30 languages. Copywriting, translating, localizing, editing and proofreading websites, apps, brochures, newsletters, videos, blogs and events – we complete thousands of projects every month in our offices in Los Angeles, Berlin and Zurich. As one of the most innovative language services in the world, clients benefit from our technical expertise and online portal that makes ordering language services as easy as booking a flight.

Recruiting for: Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish
Current Opportunities:
In-house translator/language manager intern, Freelance translators and proofreaders
Specialization: Translation, Localization, Localization Management

Tiller Language Services

TLS is a boutique language services company based in Seattle that provides translation, interpretation and language consulting to organizations, corporations, foundations and events around the globe. Our capabilities extend beyond words written on a page or spoken aloud at an event. We understand the critical role of language in the effective communication of a message or achievement of an objective. That’s why we not only execute the work, but also provide strategic guidance on how to integrate language and culture into programs.

Recruiting for: Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish
Current Opportunities
: Freelance translators and interpreters
Specialization:
Translation, Interpretation, Localization

TransPerfect

TransPerfect is the world’s largest privately held language services provider, maintaining 90 offices worldwide. For more than 20 years, TransPerfect has provided comprehensive language and technology solutions to help our clients communicate and conduct business more effectively in a global marketplace. Equipped with a quality management system certified to both the ISO 9001:2015 and ISO 17100:2015 standards, TransPerfect provides a full array of language and business support services, including translation, interpretation, multicultural marketing, website globalization, subtitling, voiceovers, staffing services, e-learning and training, and legal support services. TransPerfect also offers a suite of next-generation technologies that significantly reduce costs and improve consistency throughout the translation process, making TransPerfect the vendor of choice for the world’s leading multinationals.

Hosting an information session

Recruiting for: Not specified
Current Opportunities:
Client Services Account Manager, Implementation Manager, Project Manager, Quality Manager
Specialization: Translation, Interpretation, Localization, Localization Management

Venga Global

With expertise in translation, localization, and creative services in over 100 languages, Venga partners with clients to help them go global. We follow a strategy of building robust programs for continuous translation and localization for enterprise clients. These programs are supported by an agile production team, an innovative tools and technology approach, a specialized supply chain, and an ISO certified quality assurance team. We are committed to continuous improvement and supporting our client’s accelerated growth and localization maturity.

Hosting an information sesssion

Recruiting for: Not specified
Current Opportunities:
Project Management, Localization Engineering
Specialization:
Localization Management

WIPO

WIPO is the global forum for intellectual property services, policy, information, and cooperation. We are a self-funding agency of the United Nations, with 191 member states. Our mission is to lead the development of a balanced and effective international intellectual property (IP) system that enables innovation and creativity for the benefit of all. Our mandate, governing bodies and procedures are set out in the WIPO Convention, which established WIPO in 1967.

Recruiting for: Chinese, English, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish
Current Opportunities: WIPO’s PCT Translation Division is now accepting applications for the 2018 edition of is Fellowship Program for assistant translators, terminologists, and technical specialists
Specialization:
Translation, Interpretation, Localization, Localization Management

Be sure to keep checking this page regularly as we continually update the list of 2018 employers.

How to Use Professional Translators in These 4 Fields

 

 

This blog posting is contributed by Rachel Wheeler of Morningside Translations.  Understanding the perspective from the LSPs will give translators an edge.  Read on ….

Professional translators are needed now more than ever. From HR and marketing positions to global clinical trials and e-discovery, workers with professional translation skills are in high demand. Need proof? Here are four completely different fields that require an LSP.

Marketing and E-Commerce

Today, conducting business on a global scale requires skill in reaching an international audience. It means interacting with different cultures and languages while also creating brochures, websites, ads, contracts, annual reports, etc.

In 2016, reports showed that 57 percent of participants across six continents purchased a product from an overseas-based website. By the end of that year, the U.S. ecommerce market garnered more than $322 billion in revenue. Those numbers are the product of an international audience – English speakers represent only 26 percent of the world’s internet users. As a result, translation and localization has become a must-know skill for successful international retailers and marketers.

International Litigation

International litigation is a complex field on its own. When diverse languages and cultures are added to the mix, it can become overwhelming.

Having someone with the ability to translate on the spot could be helpful in multiple situations, including but not limited to: Hearing cases in different nations; speaking with staff members who are not fluent in the prominent language of the case; identifying the differences in laws that are written in another language.

Global Clinical Trials and Research Publications

Translation has an important role in the medical industry, especially when it comes to conducting global clinical trials and publishing scientific papers.

Clinical trials require a lot of paperwork – there’s documents that the patients fill out, documents that the administering staff fills out, and documents that the doctors fill out, etc. If the research sponsor is conducting global clinical trials, then each one of these documents would need to be translated for each location, twice.

First, the documents need to be translated from the original language into the local language of the test participants. Then, once everything has been recorded, the documents must be re-translated into the original language of the research sponsor. It would be wise to have expert linguists on staff to answer questions during this lengthy process.

With 75 percent of scientific papers are written in English, a translator is needed in order for others in the scientific community to gain access to these papers

Patent Filing

Filing a patent is a tedious process. It is even more so when you’re applying in a different language under a different set of regulations.

Filing and maintaining a patent application in an international market can range from $11,400 in Israel to $25,700 in Japan. As the filing prices increase, so do the translation costs. According to the European Commission, “the costs for a single translation of a patent may be more than €1500.”

Hiring an LSP will not only help cut down costs, but will ensure accuracy throughout the patent application process. Having to file for an international patent again is a waste of both monetary and intangible resources (e.g. time).

Tips on Becoming an LSP

The secret is out: Translators are in high demand. So, how do you get ahead? Here are a few pro tips.

Revise, Revise, Revise: You wouldn’t call a plumber to fix a broken pipe only to leave your house without checking everything’s in working order. When it comes to translation, you should make sure all your files are accurate and error-free before returning to the client.

Make sure you’re comfortable: If you’re uncomfortable with the subject matter and language style, then it’s time swallow your pride. Whether you think so or not, your comfort level will affect the quality of your work.

Don’t be afraid to use your references: As a translator, your job is to be accurate. That’s what that stack of reference material, style guides, and glossaries are for. Use them.

 

Fit For Fitbit – How Alex Alyakrinskiy (MATLM ’17) Landed His Job

Alex Alyakrinskiy graduated from Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS) with an MA degree in Translation and Localization Management (English-Russian) in spring of 2017. Prior to coming to MIIS, he worked as Localization Project Manager at a small LSP in Palo Alto. Alex is currently a Localization Program Manager at Fitbit in San Francisco.

*How did you find your job?

 I started looking for a job four months prior to graduation. After several interviews, I landed a part-time job at a startup which allowed me the flexibility to work remotely and finish graduate school. That experience gave me an understanding of localization stakeholders which in turn helped with my full-time job search. I always wanted to combine my passion for sports, healthcare and foreign languages. As soon as I saw a job opening at Fitbit on LinkedIn I applied right away. I was hired after four rounds of interviews.

*What experiences at MIIS helped?

It goes without saying that understanding the industry plays a key role in successful employment. The localization industry is very dynamic and multi-faceted—there is something in it for everyone. Working with my MIIS career advisors Winnie Heh and Lee Desser helped to shape my resume and highlight my professional goals. Attending localization meetups and networking events such as IMUG and SF Globalization helped me to understand the versatility of our industry and align my interests and skills with opportunities in the field.

The TLM program provided a solid foundation in the latest localization tools and technical skills so valued today. I didn’t realize how closely marketing is connected to localization until I took Adam Wooten’s Marketing for Localization course. The skills I gained in that class furthered my understanding of international markets, establishing liaisons with marketing stakeholders and addressing global product launches. The Localization Practicum was a detailed hands-on class that showed the value of team work and provided the latest industry best practices which I use on daily basis at Fitbit.

 *What advice would you share with MIIS students?

“There is always room for improvement. Keep networking, update your resume religiously and constantly work on yourself.” I heard that advice from a MIIS career advisor. It turned out to be the best advice I received. Looking for a job is a full-time job. Study hard, absorb new skills and try to get as much practical experience as possible. We all have different personalities and temperaments, which brings diversity and enriches every workplace. Stay true to yourself, network and establish genuine connections that will lead you to your perfect career.

Winnie Heh

Career Advisor

MIIS

 

ASK ME HOW I GOT HIRED – Riddhi Desai (MAT ’18, MIIS)

Riddhi Desai is a Certified Public Accountant from the State of New York. She worked for top consulting firms such as PricewaterhouseCoopers, LLP and Deloitte, LLP prior to coming to MIIS to pursue a degree in Translation (English – Japanese). She landed translation projects on equity research with Shared Research Inc. in summer 2017.  According to the company’s website, they “offer corporate clients comprehensive report coverage, a service that allows them to better inform investors and other stakeholders by presenting a continuously updated third-party view of business fundamentals, independent of investment biases.”  This offered a great opportunity for Riddhi to leverage her financial and language training.  Here is her path to this opportunity.

*How did you find your job/internship?

After several rounds of lengthy translation tests with a certain company from the career fair, communication fizzled out. By that point, my other classmates had secured wonderful internships and I was feeling like a failure in comparison. In a moment of utter desperation, I remembered a company I’d heard about that specialized in equity research translation, the field in which I’m most interested. Unfortunately, like most companies in this field, they weren’t advertising anywhere about recruiting, nor did they have any job postings. I found their general recruiting address online, and cold-emailed them explaining my background asking if they were in need of freelancers. I hadn’t expected anyone to reply, but they did!

*What experiences at MIIS helped (career management course, career fair, individual career advice, the MIIS network, coursework, class project, immersive learning experiences)?

When I was feeling down after the fiasco with the previous company, talking with Winnie Heh, my Career Adviser, really helped. She reminded me that I could choose to either mope about things, or pick myself up and start again. I’d also first heard about Shared Research from a couple of MIIS professors who knew I had an interest in equity research.

*What advice would you share with MIIS students?

The job search isn’t over until you stop searching. If a path to an internship doesn’t present itself to you, carve your own. Even when the situation is dire, don’t give up!

 

Winnie Heh

Career & Academic Advisor

wheh@miis.edu

 

ASK ME HOW I GOT HIRED – Frances Pao-Fang Chang (MAT ’17, MIIS)

 

Prior to coming to MIIS, Francis obtained a B.A. in Russian Language and Literature from the National Chengchi University in Taiwan and an MBA from Warsaw University in Poland. She had worked at a Taiwanese-based multinational company for 5 years as a Project Coordinator and Cost Manager before returning to school to pursue her passion for languages.

*How did you find your job?

I found my internship opportunity at the MIIS Career Fair in February of 2016 and became a summer intern at the Star Group office in Thailand for two months in the summer of 2016.

In February, 2017, I received the offer from the same office and moved to Bangkok in July, 2017.

*What experiences at MIIS helped?

With a career management course, career advising sessions, and two major Career Fairs, I was pushed to think about my career early on and prepare for it. Along with the challenging academic programs and strong support network (great people!), I became more confident in job-hunting, which would have otherwise been a daunting task.

*What advice would you share with MIIS students?

Think about a career early on, explore the resources available at MIIS (and beyond) and strive for what really interests you. Do not be discouraged if you make mistakes because these two years of study, in such an encouraging environment, are supposed to be a great time to get to know yourself and make friends for life.

Winnie Heh

Career & Academic Advisor

wheh@miis.edu

ASK ME HOW I GOT HIRED – Gaya Saghatelyan (MATLM ’17, MIIS)

Growing up in a multicultural environment, Gaya Saghatelyan has always been passionate about languages and culture. She spoke Russian, Armenian and English at home. In college, Gaya studied Business Administration at a French business school. Between college and MIIS, Gaya worked for a software company in Marketing.  She is now a Project Manager at Lionbridge, the largest language services provider in the world.

*How did you find your job/internship?

I began my journey at Lionbridge as a Sales and Marketing Intern on the IT/High-Tech team. I first learned about the opportunity through an employer information session organized by the MIIS Center for Advising and Career Services office (CACS). When I found out that the internship would give me the opportunity to work with Allison McDougall, VP of Emerging Business and an MIIS alumna, I knew it would be a great learning experience.

Coincidentally, I had met Allison the year before when she presented on an employer panel organized by Winnie Heh, my Career Advisor. At the time, I was helping Winnie organize the event and had the opportunity to network with the panelists. Through getting to know Allison and her work at Lionbridge, I knew I wanted to be a part of it.

As an intern, I learned a lot about the industry and Lionbridge’s business and met a lot of interesting people. I eventually wanted to transition into a role in operations, and Allison was extremely supportive in helping me explore opportunities at Lionbridge. She introduced me to a lot of key people and encouraged me to share what I had learned at MIIS with the management team. This was an extremely valuable experience, as I got to apply what I had learned and see how this knowledge plays into the company’s strategy.

Upon graduation, I was offered a full-time position on the Project Management team. I am extremely grateful to CACS for establishing this key partnership with Lionbridge and to Allison for spearheading it.

*What experiences at MIIS helped (career management course, career fair, individual career advice, the MIIS network, coursework, class project, immersive learning experiences)?

As you can see from my personal story, connecting with people played a key role in my career. Winnie Heh, Lee Desser, Bryce Craft and Emily Weidner all put a tremendous amount of effort into organizing useful TILM career events so that we can connect with the industry. In addition, our professors, Max Troyer and Adam Wooten, encouraged us to attend industry events such as IMUG and Women in Localization. These events were a great way to enhance the classroom experience and I continue to attend them as a working professional.

I was also delighted to see that the knowledge we gained in our program is highly applicable to the real world. For example, I often use the documentation and file management best practices we learned in Max Troyer’s Project Management class, as well the marketing tools covered in Adam Wooten’s International Marketing class. I even had the chance to present some of my class projects to my colleagues at Lionbridge.

*What advice would you share with MIIS students?

  1. Keep learning. Learn as much as possible about your industry while you’re at MIIS. It may seem overwhelming or theoretical, but you will take that knowledge with you and make yourself an invaluable asset.
  2. Explore different roles. Don’t limit yourself to only one specialization, because there are so many opportunities out there. Be open-minded about taking on new roles.
  3. Connect with people. It’s a small industry, make genuine connections with people and help your colleagues. Networking is not about pushing your agenda, it’s about learning from others.

Finally, always remember, you are in one of the best programs in the country, if not the world. Your skills are in demand.

 

Winnie Heh

Career Advisor

wheh@miis.edu

 

 

 

ASK ME HOW I GOT HIRED – Zilin Cui (MACI ’18, MIIS)

 

Zilin Cui is expected to graduate from the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS) with a degree in Conference Interpretation. Her language combination is English (A), Chinese (B) and Spanish (C). Prior to coming to MIIS, she has worked as a banking analyst, an assistant economist and an interpreter/translator in Chile. She interned at the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington D.C. in summer of 2017.

*How did you find your job/internship?

I applied on the organization’s website after Prof. Barry Slaughter Olsen told us about the opportunity in March. About two months later I was phone interviewed, and a week later I received the offer letter.

*What experiences at MIIS helped (career management course, career fair, individual career advice, the MIIS network, coursework, class project, immersive learning experiences)?

Everything mentioned here helped, to different degrees. I would say individual career advice, DC career week and the MIIS network were the most helpful.

I met with Winnie Heh, my Career Advisor, before my first semester started and I think it was very helpful to hear from her point of view both as a T&I graduate and as someone who has years of experience recruiting and managing language professionals. It gave me a realistic picture of what to expect – I had come with the idea of becoming a UN interpreter and getting an UN internship for the summer but I realized over time that the path is not so straightforward, and that changing directions isn’t admitting defeat but rather embracing new opportunities.

DC career week gave me the opportunity to attend info sessions at international organizations I envisioned myself working for, through which I met interpretation and translation section chiefs and heard from them first-hand what I needed to do get to where I wanted to be. You can find my reflection on the trip here. I highly recommend anyone thinking of working in the States at all to attend – it gives you an idea what to expect once you graduate and reassures you that there is indeed a future after MIIS 🙂

And last but not least – the “MIIS Mafia” is a force to be reckoned with – during my DC trip I met MIIS alums at almost every organization I visited. Every one of them was delighted to see current MIIS students and some were very helpful with specific advice on applying to internships and career planning. Think about what organization you are interested in working/interning for and ask your career advisor/program coordinator if they know of any alum who has worked/is working there. You can research all you want but nothing beats hearing the inside scope, especially if it comes from someone who more likely than not wants to help you!

*What advice would you share with MIIS students?

  • Manage your expectations – this is one of the biggest things I learned both during my internship search and from my internship. I had expected to find an internship by March but did not secure mine until early May, by which time I was pleasantly surprised that I got one. Going into my internship I had ambitious goals of improving my interpretation into all my working languages and produce “audience-ready” interpretation by the end of my 2-month stint and get a return offer. Well, that did not happen and I only focused on one working language, which turned out to be a wiser approach since the same principles and techniques apply to any language pair. Interpreting skills and background knowledge takes years to build up, and it is important to keep that in mind when you feel frustrated with yourself; I certainly have and it is important to take things in perspective and move beyond that. A good internship should be an enriching and humbling experience. To appreciate its value requires us to have the appropriate expectations of ourselves and of the internship to and to distinguish between short-, medium- and long-term goals.
  • Take advantage of every opportunity out there – career fair, DC trip, meeting with your advisor/professors – do not think in terms of “will this land me an internship/job/gig” because that creates unrealistic expectations and unnecessary anxiety. Treat each opportunity as an occasion through which you can learn about the profession and get to know people – network is important in our profession, but approach it not from a utilitarian perspective and instead, think about how you can help each other (thanks Winnie for that advice!)
  • Don’t take things personally – be it feedback, be it the way that someone treated you on a particular day, and this applies to more than the internship or your time at MIIS but on a more general level. The more you are able to detach yourself from the situation, the less likely you will get emotionally involved and use the feedback/learning constructively.

Winnie Heh

Career Advisor

wheh@miis.edu

ASK ME HOW I GOT HIRED – Colleen Feng (MATLM ’18, MIIS)

 

Colleen Feng is expecting to graduate from Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS) with an MA degree in Translation and Localization Management in summer of 2018. Prior to coming to MIIS, she earned an MA degree in Teaching English as a Second Language and taught English.  In summer of 2017, she worked as a Localization Intern at Sony Interactive Entertainment PlayStation in California.

*How did you find your job/internship?

I first saw this internship post on LinkedIn, and later it was posted on Zocalo, an online job board at MIIS.

*What experiences at MIIS?

Through taking courses in TLM, I have gained knowledge of localization project management, CAT tools, Python, desktop publishing and translation. Putting all the course names on my resume helped make it more relevant to the localization intern positions I wanted to apply for. I was also able to be more confident during the interviews with concepts of the localization industry in mind. Besides the coursework, I think having individual career meetings with my Career Advisor was the biggest help in securing my internship position. Those one-on-one discussions helped me figure out what internship position I was interested in. My Career Advisor conducted mock interviews with me, connected me with MIIS alumni, revised my resume and helped me polish my professional presence.

*What advice would you share with MIIS students?

The most important lesson I’ve learned during my first year at MIIS is to always be open to different opportunities and never stop stepping out of my comfort zone. I personally think MIIS is a great place to meet people from all over the world, and it’s been rewarding for me to not simply focus on the coursework, but also to meet new friends and try things I’ve never tried before. In the professional aspect, attending localization conferences and events have helped me learn more about the localization industry and build my network in the localization industry.

 

Winnie Heh

Career Advisor

MIIS

Trait Trees for LSP Project Managers

MIIS alumna, Sijing Yu (MATLM ‘16) won the GALA 2017 Rising Star Award. I am thrilled to share the  winning essay on my blog.  Congrats, Sijing!  We are proud of you!

https://www.gala-global.org/publications/trait-trees-lsp-project-managers-rising-star-winner?utm_content=51077548&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter

Winnie Heh

Career & Academic Advisor

Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey

MIIS DC Career Exploration Week Reflection

I had a fruitful time participating in the DC Exploration Week as a first-year T&I student (English-Chinese-Spanish). I only attended four information sessions in my field of study since the rest are only open to citizens/permanent residents or are non-language related: the Inter-American Development Bank, Organization of American States, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Bank. I also attended the reception on Thursday night at the MIIS DC office. Since my dream is to one day become a staff interpreter at an international organization, the trip was very informative and valuable. I learned a lot through the info sessions that I would like to share here.

First of all, it was very encouraging to see so many of our alumni in these international organizations. All of the info sessions I went to had MIIS alumni on their staff. They were very happy to see current students thinking about their careers early on. I only wish there were more MIIS students from the T&I program! We have a relatively large program, but the info sessions had no more than 15 attendees at a time and from only one or two language programs, which was a bit disappointing given how much work the organizations put into organizing the sessions for us.

Attending info sessions is one of the best ways to research about the organizations. Our hosts were translation section chiefs, HR directors, senior program managers, among others. Their hour-long info sessions usually stretched to an hour and a half, and in some cases two hours, as they gave us crash courses on their organization and how their language unit works (and some even showed us the booths!). Some of them even gave us answers to questions that we may be asked in interviews.  Although I put a few hours into researching the organizations prior to attending, nothing came close to being as helpful as talking to people who actually work there. The alums were especially cordial and some gave us their contact information.

It’s a long and winding road to becoming a staff interpreter/translator at an international organization, and our best way to proceed is to hear early how to prepare from the staff. As I discovered during the past few days, in-house opportunities at international organizations are few and getting fewer (due to budget cuts proposed by the new administration, and the growing trend of outsourcing around 70% of their translation and interpretation work). There is also a gap between most students’ professional capacity and the level required for international organizations, which look for mid-career professionals. So here comes the catch-22 regarding experience: how do you get experience when nobody wants to hire you if you don’t have any? Fortunately, there is a way out. Our alums at the World Bank (WB) specifically pointed out that we need in order to (1) get our foot in the door, (2) have specialized knowledge in a field (or more) other than languages, and (3) get the right kind of exposure.

Regarding (1): one of the alumni started as an assistant photo editor at one of the international organizations on a short-term contract, and another worked on aligning texts. At first, they were not thrilled about having graduated from MIIS and having to do something unrelated to their training and aspirations, but they stuck with it, let the higher ups know about their core skills, and eventually got the positions they wanted.

Regarding (2): with 70% of the T&I work outsourced, the language departments at international organizations are functioning less like translation/interpretation teams and more like LSPs within their own organizations. For example, one of the biggest “requesters” (in WB lingo) for WB’s language services is ICSID (International Center for the Settlement of Trade Disputes, part of the World Bank Group), and the translation chief emphasized that they look for people who can work at the conference level, bi-directionally, and with specialized knowledge in economics and law. The specialized knowledge does not have to come from formal training – reading books, researching, and teaching ourselves is an essential part of being a good translator/interpreter.

Regarding (3): for students with no experience in the field, volunteering can be a good start. TED has subtitling opportunities and Translators Without Borders offer a chance to practice language skills while contributing to a good cause. Gradually, one should aim for higher profile work (the T&I world is very small and word of mouth matters a lot). It is also important to get to know the chief interpreters/translators (the people at the international organizations who staff their events and translation teams) – sending résumés and asking about freelance opportunities is a good way to make initial contact, since these organizations are constantly seeking to expand their rosters. Some will give tests (in which case, do not shy away!) and some will rely on recommendations by senior professionals they have worked with before, so it is important to start early and build a portfolio.

Lastly, skills other than translation/interpretation itself are becoming increasingly important. Many international organizations are working with CAT tools (many of them are transitioning to the UN’s own CAT-tool, eLUNA), and they recommend getting familiar with as many kinds as possible. Terminology management is also important – although it seems like no organization aside from WIPO looks for terminologists, these organizations expect translators and interpreters to contribute to terminology management. Being able to work in teams is indispensable – translation departments at international organizations process over a dozen million words per year, and to be a successful translator, one has to know how to collaborate with colleagues (in addition to working under tight deadlines, being meticulous about details, and being able to revise their own work, among others).

Personally, I found the info sessions very helpful – I had already applied to internships at two of the organizations by the time I attended the sessions, and since international organizations tend to move very slowly, it was also my chance to express my interest and gently nudge them to look out for my application.

Final advice I have to future attendees:

  • Use the student & alumni reception as a great networking opportunity. Exchange your cards with your friends/classmates so you can work more efficiently (wish I thought of this earlier!). Plus, looking out for each other is not just the right thing to do; it will bring good professional “karma”.
  • Showing up is half the success. Try to go if you have an opportunity. How else would you stand out among the thousands of applicants to the few dozens of internship opportunities? Once you can have them put a face to a name, you are already ahead of the game.
  • Do not be afraid to ask questions and talk with the presenters after the info session. The organizers appreciate thoughtful questions, and especially if they are MIIS alumni, they want to see you succeed.
  • Of course, dress professionally and think of yourself as a young professional. Don’t feel intimidated (guilty as charged but I will improve next year)!

Zilin Cui

MACI 2018

Middlebury Institute of International

Studies at Monterey