Catching Up to the Pace of a Developing State

If you haven’t heard, Fiji will be cohosting COP 23 of the UNFCCC with Sweden this November. This is a pretty big deal because it is the first time a small island developing state has taken this role.  As an environmental policy student, and as an American, it is quite the change to see how prominent climate change is in Fiji.  The newspaper has a section dedicated to the environment and the UN Oceans Conference is headline news.  Fiji is in a tough spot because like the rest of Oceania, their contributions to climate change are minuscule while they are about to face some of its earliest consequences.

Continue reading

Human centered design for CBRM

The weeks have passed quickly in Hawaii.  Between sunsets and conference calls July turned to August. Adventure and work have co-mingled in an internship that has expanded my conservation knowledge to the practicalities of internal operations and external partnerships. I don’t have to tell you how beautiful Hawaii is, but it takes a while to explore and get to know this place. I have been to many beautiful beaches, swum with sea turtles, seen countless humuhumunukunukuapua’a (reef trigger fish), observed a mother monk seal and her pup, and have been alerted by panicked beach goers of a shark in the water.

The mountains of Waimanalo

Swimming with turtles at Electric Beach

Continue reading

A Break for Blue Pioneers

It’s hard to believe I have less than a month left before the end of my fellowship. This past month has flown by. I had a two week hiatus from my work with NOAA to participate in the Blue Pioneers Program, a pilot program funded by the Packard Foundation which seeks to build a pipeline of social entrepreneurs in the Chinese Blue Economy. The two week program consisted of lectures, workshops, group excursions and a business pitch which culminated with a sleepover at the Monterey Bay Aquarium! It was an amazing opportunity to work with students from China and Blue Economy Professionals from all over the world. We covered topics ranging from supply chain transparency, to aquaculture feed, to funding and scaling startup ventures. Since my fellowship has been focused solely on the government sector, it was nice to look at things from an NGO and business perspective.

On the final night of BPP, we spent the night in the aquarium while polishing up our business pitches.

While not in the program, I’ve continued to work on my project of analyzing the level of benthic habitat regulations within federal MPAs. It’s been pretty tedious tracking down all of the regulations that exist in so many different places. At most sites, I’m looking at executive orders, management plans, the code of federal regulations and myriad other sources from multiple federal agencies. It feels good to know that my completed work will serve as a solid foundation for others to build upon.

Since Monterey is the satellite office, conference calls with the East Coast are pretty regular.

When I’m not digging through management plans, I get to spend time around heritage harbor enjoying the weather we’ve had this summer. A few weeks ago, the entire office got together for a bocce ball tournament. Not a bad way to spend the afternoon.

The office bocce ball tournament (I didn’t win unfortunately).

I’m approaching the end of my fellowship and for the next few weeks I’ll be hard at work taking all of my research and translating into a more visual format. This experience has been very rewarding so far and I look forward to taking my new knowledge and expertise with me when I am finished.

Observing Fisheries Governance & Management First Hand in São Tomé

July was an exciting and enriching month for me split between the island nation of São Tomé and Principe and FAO headquarters in Rome. I spent the first week of July in the capital of São Tomé participating in a FAO mission in support of that country’s first ever National Fisheries Week and in response to a request by the government to work with FAO to develop a national Blue Growth strategy. Continue reading

Find Your Tribe

How do you, as a young, new comer contribute to an organization that has been working on complex environmental issues for 50 years and is already staffed by intelligent, dedicated and creative people? This is what I’ve been asking myself since starting this internship. I still don’t know if I have a full answer, but I’ve definitely been doing what I can to help with the issues EDF is trying to address.  Continue reading

A Case for Monitoring

One of the exciting aspects of my fellowship this summer has given me the opportunity to see the work supported by the California State Coastal Conservancy on the ground. Project monitoring not only gets me out of the office and away from a computer screen but has allowed me to travel to all 9 of the San Francisco Bay Area counties (San Francisco, San Mateo, Alameda, Contra Costa, Solano, Napa, Sonoma, and Marin), most which I had never visited before. Because of this, I’ve come to understand how large the Bay Area really is, with its many different landscapes and communities (and traffic). Continue reading

Aloha from the Rainbow State

The fiery archipelago of Hawaii is one of the most fascinating places I have visited. The islands’ stunning landscapes contain high levels of endemism. Walking around the sprawling metropolis of Honolulu, bright, fragrant flowers attract colorful birds with rounded narrow beaks. Diversity in nature intersects diversity in culture as Polynesian traditions blend with Filipino and Japanese influence.

 

Sunset sailing is a great way to enjoy the beauty of Diamond Head

Continue reading

Where the Rubber Meets the Road

Palau may be a small country but it is positioning itself as a mighty force in the world of ocean conservation and smart growth. Palau created a shark sanctuary in 2001. In 2007, Palau established a nation-wide Protected Areas Network which is funded, in large part, by a Green Fee levied on foreign tourists. In 2015, Palau took the plunge and designated their entire EEZ as a National Marine Sanctuary, closing all waters to commercial fishing and setting aside 80% as a no-take zone. As of this year, the country is doubling-down on smart growth and responsible tourism. Countless international NGOs, foundations, and foreign governments have a presence in the country and collaborate on everything from tuna tagging to aerial surveys for illegal fishing boats. Continue reading

Winter is Coming

I’ve just been hearing reports that all my friends and family in California are dying of heatstroke, and you know what that means- it must be winter! In Fiji, that is. Fijians in the PCEG office at IUCN are all talking about how cold it’s getting here in Suva, but today is the first day I wore a light sweater, and I had to take it off halfway through the day after I got overheated. I actually had to learn how to convert Fahrenheit to Celsius from a Polish guy at my hostel when I visited the tourist town of Nadi, in order to tell people about the vast temperature range in my hometown. Something apparently pretty foreign to Fijians. Continue reading

Where the marine meets the mountains

It is a peculiar and strange innervation working on issues in the marine space but working in a location that is surrounded by snow-capped mountains. The closest saltwater environment is Great Salt Lake while the closest marine environment is surprisingly and amusingly the Gulf of California (Mar de Cortez). Marine scientists more than likely spend more time 60 feet below water than on mountains above 14000 feet, but that has been this summer. A perplexing circumstance of opposites that have raised eyebrows of people who hear about the work I have been doing and where. Continue reading

Only a mile from MIIS

I may not have ended up in a tropical country this summer but my office in Heritage Harbor, only a few blocks from MIIS, is exactly the place to be for anyone interested in marine policy. Not only do we get picturesque views of the Monterey Harbor and surrounding bay, my office in the NOAA Marine Protected Areas Center is surrounded by dozens of similar government organizations and NGOs. This includes representation for the MBNMFS, Save the Whales, Oceana, The Nature Conservancy, the Monterey Bay Aquarium, staff offices for elected officials, and many more I haven’t come across yet. Continue reading

Sustainability Across Borders

Hello from San Diego!

Not captured on camera: the green flash.

Last week-end, I crossed the border and adventured to Baja. I was warned that entering Baja at Tijuana — a chaotic metropolis not without its own charms — can be jarring for first-time border-crossers. Yet, I didn’t expect to be struck by the lack of vegetarian options. In Tijuana, before taking the bus to Ensenada, I tried to get lunch at a food stall. In my rusty spanish, I asked the vendor if he had anything vegetarian. He chuckled and mentioned that the guy across the street had chicken. After I reminded him that chicken was a type of meat, he pointed out that if I was really hungry, the store around the corner sold candy. I gave up and snacked on the bread and peanut butter I had packed earlier that morning. Continue reading