Supplier and Consumer: How huge gap between us?

Chiao Ting

This summer, I decided not to apply for an internship in the U.S., I went to my home country: Taiwan.


This country is located between the East China Sea and the South China Sea. However, many seafood products were from IUU vessels or from nearshore bottom trawler boats. Therefore, the first work is checking where the seafood products are from?


The second work is helping the Michelin restaurants not over-use the seafood products and trigger the environment goes to a worse situation. Recently, Michelin restaurants become an important mark for international tourists. According to the Guide of Michelin in 2019, there are 124 restaurants are in the “Le Guide Michelin” and 24 restaurants have Michelin Star. To stimulate consumers to come again, my company has to find out unique fish, including barnacle, giant isopod (Bathynomus), and Pacific mole crab (Hippaovalis). To provide “unique” seafood for these restaurants, the company has found a lot of different seafood. However, the company forgot how high impact on the catering when these Michelin restaurants have used a new product in their cuisine. Therefore, my second work is educating these chefs’ why we should not use this seafood or shorten the providing period even though the supplying season has not finished.


After reporting how negative impact on the environment of the fish resources to client restaurants, the company had a huge conflict: conceal the information or reveal the information? It is not surprising that all investors were gone, and the company closed. It is a sad story about a company’s bankrupt because of protecting fish resources.
What did I learn from the summer internship? First, even though the Taiwanese Government supports the Sustainable Development Goals in many developing countries, in contrast, in Taiwan, the biggest stakeholder in the industry may not be ready to change their attitude and concentrate on the issue of fish resources collapse in Asia. How to lead the industry to go to a better situation? Probably you will ask some questions: how about using policies and regulation from the government? The South China Sea and the East China Sea have many countries share the marine resources. The marine resources sharing becomes an important issue and not many governments want to secrecy their own fishery industry. Interestingly, the fishery industry already knows how to circumvent the policy and earns the maximum benefit by under-table cooperation.


Second, by education from NGOs? Well, how many consumers cannot know where fish are from? How many fish traders conceal the information just for higher income? The overlapping and closing fishing areas in the north of Taiwan and the large and far area in the south of Taiwan lead the small-scale fishery to have a huge challenge in regulation and management. Shall Taiwan department of fishery ask for help? Or, can Taiwan re-draw its ocean zoning to elevate its efficiency? Recently, the Department of fishery supports aquaculture. While checking these projects of aquaculture, it seems does not have too many high technologies which can improve the pollution from the traditional fish farm. Can the farmed fish be accepted by these restaurants’ chefs’ or consumers?


In August, my guide and I have had a very long conversation. Two years ago, he educated chefs’ use “Ike Jime” (a method of slaughtering fish to maintain the quality of its meat) to let a fish die in less painful (animal right). This year, we used the impact in Facebook to reveal how worse of the fish resources in this summer, then, we announce that we won’t provide IUU fish to the Michelin restaurants until the day when the fish resources recovered. Maybe in this cruel way, the catering industry will self-reflect how to cook their seafood cautiously.


My guider told me: this time, we’ve given these chefs a lesson. However, we have another challenge: the traditional markets in Asia where is the biggest stakeholder but cannot be impacted by Business to Business.

p.s. I am wondering to say THANK YOU for my friends: Brian (Seafood Watch office), Tim (Fish Choice), Pam and Jim (Monterey Bay Aquarium), Fisheries Trust, Ocean2Table, Louie (Seafood Legacy in Japan), China Blue, Mr. Chang-An Cheng (Consultant in the Taipei City Government). Your suggestion will lead me to how to stimulate an industry or a local government to use the marine resources in high efficiency.

Reflections of My Summer in San Diego

Living that office life

Accomplishments and Impact of my Fellowship with TRNERR/CCCIA

Although my Fellowship and time in San Diego was coming to a close at the end of August, the experiences and opportunities continued at full speed. During my last few weeks I was able to complete a number of deliverables that helped tie together my new skills and experience in coastal adaptation. I was also encouraged and supported to get involved in a few things out of the office that turned out to be fantastic networking and professional development opportunities.

            At the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve (TRNERR), I became involved in researching and developing a number of reports to help the resiliency team and the Coastal Training Program. The first was a climate scenario report for the Batiquitos Lagoon Adaptation and Resiliency Plan. This project in being put on by TRNERR, in conjunction with a number of local government agencies, to determine adaptation management options for the Lagoon, located in Carlsbad, CA. During the past two years stakeholders have come together to discuss the importance of the lagoon, its wildlife and habitat, and how they might be threatened by climate scenarios. Two scenarios are being considered: moderate and extreme. This report discussed the scenarios, based on temperate changes and sea level rise, and how they would impact the natural aspects of the Lagoon. The report includes species and habitat level impacts and will help to inform the final adaptation and resiliency options for the Lagoon’s natural resource management. The report is currently being reviewed by stakeholders.

US Mexico Border

            The second deliverable I helped to create was a Market Analysis of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) in the environmental space in San Diego. This report is TRNERR’s kick-off point as they explore opportunities for growth in the local DEI space. For this project I researched local DEI trainers and facilitators, as well as leadership institutions working statewide and nationally to increase diversity. I also explored what facilitators, research groups, and consultants might be able to offer in terms of capacity and resources. This report was strictly for internal use, but it helped me understand how intertwined inclusion and environmental work is, especially in a border region. Environmental issues do not impact all people equally, and we must confront this in order to avoid injustices. If we truly want environmental work and policy to be effective, we must change our practices and adopt an equity lens. Natural resources and climate change do not follow national boundaries or socioeconomic constructs. Planning a healthy and sustainable future will require equitable planning and stakeholder inclusion.

            The last written TRNERR project I participated in was the creation of a Resiliency and Binational Strategies Appendix to the Comprehensive Management Plan and its new Strategic Plan. This plan, re-structured for the next 5 years, is the guiding document for all operations within the Reserve. This report was a great culmination of the topics I wanted to learn about during my time with TRNERR: how to use plan for sea level rise at the ecosystem level, and how international environmental management can be used to bridge socioeconomic and environmental issues. The document spanned all departments within the Reserve, from Administration to Coastal Training Program and Research. It is intended to be used as an extra resource to show people what efforts are being made to expand binational participation and plan for the impacts of climate change. It is therefore intrinsically intertwined to the Batiquitos Lagoon climate scenario planning and the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion report.

            My time at the Center for Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation also was coming to a close with the completion of a few deliverables. As this internship focused more on science communications and project management, it only made sense that the resulting projects were public facing. The first was a newsletter to inform the public (including funders and legislators) about the sea level rise and coastal research being done by CCCIA affiliated researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Requiring input from staff scientists and graduate students, the newsletter came together with quotes and photographs.

To complement this, we developed a project website for research in the San Diego Bay. The project will monitor and collect data on waves and tidal patterns within the Bay, turning them into a predictive model that informs adaptation planning for local agencies.  We created the design and language for the website, so that relevant agencies can understand the inputs and outcomes of the research, as well as see what other public agencies are doing to plan for sea level rise.

Professional and Personal Benefits from my Fellowship

The experiences, skills, and final project accomplishments I completed during my summer have given me a greater understanding of the work of California adaptation policy, as well as an understanding of the adaptation network. Meeting people and hearing their advice and input on career moves was incredibly valuable.

My supervisor at CCCIA encouraged me to get the most out of my time in San Diego by meeting with local decision makers and professionals in the local coastal policy network. I was beginning to realize how small the local network is, seeing the same names on several reports and email chains, and meeting people twice and thrice in meetings and conferences. I was happy to be connected with these people to learn what they did in their job, their career goals and pathways, and collect any advice they were willing to impart on me. Talking with these people was one of the greatest takeaways of my summer Fellowship experience.

Self-discovery and Self-realization as a result of my Fellowship

Now that my summer CBE Fellowship has closed, I have concluded a few things. The first was that my decision to gain experience in a place where I may want to work professionally (instead of using my summer to travel to a ‘far off island’ and work on something ‘cool’, but not really reflective of my future career path) was a prudent decision. It helped me make connections and build a network.

Next, I have learned to ask for what you want out of an internship, and to take advantage of any opportunity. Instead of sitting in one office all summer, I wanted to gain the experience of two places. So I asked if this could be accommodated, and the answer was yes. I also requested to meet as many people as possible. Again, I was lucky enough to be supported in achieving this request. In summary, I’m thankful for having the opportunity to do this fellowship. It turned out to be a pivotal summer in my career development and I think it will continue to benefit me for as long as I make a career in California.

The high-end restaurants’ seafood and its impact on the local environment

The high-end restaurants in Taipei are seeking for the highest quality of seafood from the local seafood markets. The crucial character of local seafood in the north coast of Taiwan is that vendors sale living fishes. The crucial reason is that there are many Buddhists buy the living fish so that they can return them into the ocean. However, living fishes are also a good product for these high-end restaurants because the character represents “high quality” and “local catching.”

“How to define the “local catching” seafood?”, “Does the work follow the inspiration of sustainability?” I’ve asked myself many times when I was working with the fishermen. I know I hold the high-end restaurants which seems like the stakeholder and can pay the highest prices in the seafood market.

Why not use the money from restaurants and help them to have the first found from the consumers? Then, they would have capitals to switch their skills.

Unfortunately, using a company to support a dream is very difficult. While my company connects to the relation between the restaurants and producer and the producers have enough income in the first month, they did not want to change their fishing skills and seek for a sustainable fishery. Instead, the high-end restaurants support the fishermen to catch fish by bottom trawling in the near-shore area (less than 3NM, 3NM-12NM, and the products were IUU).

Even though the restaurants’ general managers knew it is an illegal activity, but the cheapest prices in the market and the lack of power of prohibition lead the situation becomes worse. Uncomfortable cooperation is a cheat. It seems these Michelin Star restaurants just want to use the stars to sell products. It is the reason why: when we require them to carry the social responsibility and environmental responsibility in their selling, they have many reasons to circumvent the responsibilities on the local environment. The “local product using” is like a joke in the catering.

p.s. My company decided to stop providing services to these restaurants. Probably this decision will let my company has very long time cannot have a stable income. However, I hope the Micheline office can use top-down impact on these Michelin restaurants to follow the SDGs and take the social and environmental responsibility.

The sea urchin is transported in animal welfare. Each living sea urchin from my company has kelps in the box. The kelp in the box provides a comfortable environment (for food and for hiding) for sea urchin.

The Importance of Safeguards in Conservation Projects

US Capitol, Washington DC

As the summer goes on, I have been working and learning with the Environmental and Social Safeguards Team here at WWF. My team has been inclusive and supportive. I got to participate in different workshops and webinars in which the safeguards team trained WWF offices located in Latin America on safeguards policies. 

I think implementing environmental and social safeguards is an innovative approach and WWF is setting an example of how environmental organizations and NGOs need to constantly evolve and adapt to new circumstances and see communities as an integral part of conservation projects. WWF-US recently stated its commitment to safeguards, making it perfect timing for me to learn about this new and upcoming topic.

In addition to enjoying my internship I have had the chance to explore Washington DC. I am able to to visit a museum after work, go to an educational film, explore the city and meet new people. For example, I had the opportunity to meet US Congressmen and tour government buildings. Most museums and attractions are free and it is easy to bike or take public transportation from one place to the other. 

Closing the gap between community development and environmental management

My summer in San Diego is in full swing! Both sides of my internship have fully picked up. I am splitting my time between Scripps’ Center for Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation (CCCIA) and the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve (TRNERR). I started my first two weeks at TRNERR, but then switched over two weeks full time at CCCIA, while my TRNERR boss prepares to defend her dissertation.

During my first few days at CCCIA I got to meet some of the coastal researchers, the graduate students who work in the labs, and some of the office staff working on governmental relations and project management. The research they are doing is fascinating. For example, one crew created an enclosed system that simulates a wave crashing on the shore; intended to collect data about sea spray and aerosols produced by ocean water. This groundbreaking research will tell us how ocean water interacts with the atmosphere, how it links to public health and air quality. As the lead scientist, Kim Prather, says, ‘When they close the beach for high bacteria, they tell you not to swim, but they don’t tell you not to breath’.

Wave simulation machine

I joined in on meetings with Ocean Acidification scientists, who are putting together a research summit in a few months. In preparation for their conference, they asked me to look into the statewide ocean acidification guidance and research priorities to ensure their efforts correctly align with funding opportunities. I also sat in on a briefing of all the research and scientific investigation occurring in and around the Tijuana River Estuary during a briefing for local elected officials. This was a unique opportunity to merge my two internship components: CCCIA conducting research in conjunction with TRNERR, as it is communicated to decision makers. This briefing was a slice of policy-making I had never experienced before and helped me understand the process for funding scientific research, filling knowledge gaps, and translating data into management decisions.

In addition to meeting the team and attending meetings and trainings, I also helped put together the CCCIA newsletter and reconstruct their webpage. These types of projects are crucial for science communications and project management. I now understand how integral sharing research findings is for good policy and management decisions!

I’ve also been able to get even more involved with all things Tijuana River. One of the biggest projects I participated in was a binational partnership between UCSD students and professors, TRNERR, and the local community is Los Laureles Canyon, Tijuana. The Binational Partnership Lab at UCSD hires about 10 interns every summer to carry out projects across the border in one of the most disadvantaged communities in Tijuana. This neighborhood, known as Los Laureles, is one of the highest sediment contributors to the Tijuana Estuary. This means that because the area is naturally erosive, sediment is carried by rainwater and urban run-off in excess. It flows directly across the border in the Tijuana Reserve, and out into the Pacific Ocean. This canyon is also booming with unregulated development, where roads are not paved or properly maintained, and basic plumbing and waste collection is lacking. These issues create not only an environmental issue for the US side of the watershed, but also a flooding hazard and dangerous living environment for the residents of the canyon. This truly embodies how social development and environmental protection are intertwined.

View from Los Laureles Canyon neighborhood in Tijuana

I was able to help the interns in their community activities and workshops in the local community center in Tijuana. Walking across the border and meeting residents in the Los Laureles Canyon allowed me to connect the social issues to environmental burdens downstream. I hope to continue enabling international communities to make more sustainable environmental decisions that will protect not only neighboring ecosystems, but also their local wellbeing and security.

I’ve been really enjoying spending time at the Tijuana River NERR, learning about the Coastal Training Program, binational issues, and all the research collaborations. Now that I have also onboarded with CCCIA, I am also excited to see what goes on at Scripps! Both places offer amazing networks and resources, and I look forward to how the summer culminates!

My Summer at WWF Headquarters in Washington DC

Richard Castillo Rodriguez
WWF-US Summer 2019

Tina (my Costa Rican dog) and the Lincoln Memorial

I was excited to learn I would be spending my summer in Washington DC as a Center for Blue Economy Fellow at World Wildlife Fund (WWF). I had been to the city once before as an exchange student from Costa Rica. From my first visit to Washington DC, I remember the city full of history, art, culture and free museums (perfect for a student!), so I was excited to spend a few months here. I arrived a week early to familiarize myself with my new place, the neighborhood and to explore some of the attractions in Washington DC. 

Upon my arrival to WWF Headquarters, I explored the 8-story building and met my team. During my time at WWF, I’ll work for the Environmental and Social Safeguards Team, which is a small group of professionals who is in charge of implementing WWF’s Environmental and Social Safeguards Policies (ESS) for Global Environmental Facility (GEF) and Green Climate Fund (GCF) projects. ESS policies help to preview, avoid or mitigate any possible negative impact the projects may have on the environment or the local communities. 

Because I am a native Spanish speaker and am fluent in English, my job will involve supporting projects in Latin America, for example in the Mesoamerican reef region and in Peru’s National Protected Areas. I will be synthesizing and producing information and materials on safeguards policies for WWF offices in the region. Finally, I’ll help design training materials for the team’s webinars on ESS Policies for WWF Latin American offices. This topic aligns perfectly with my professional interests since my future career goal is to work in international marine policy.

Because I am a native Spanish speaker and am fluent in English, part of my job will be assisting in translating materials for WWF Latin American offices. Finally, I’ll help design training materials for the team’s webinars on ESS Policies in Spanish. Having worked with fishing communities before, this topic is perfect for my future career and professional interests. 

Pura Vida!

The Start of my Summer at BSR in SF!

Hi! I’ve been working this summer at BSR in San Francisco’s Financial District. BSR is a global nonprofit organization that was founded at the Rio Earth Summit in 1992. The organization works with its network of more than 250 member companies and other partners to build a just and sustainable world. From its offices in Asia, Europe, and North America, BSR develops sustainable business strategies and solutions through consulting, research, and cross-sector collaboration. 

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New Projects at EDF

After a few weeks of working on my initial projects, my advisor (Rod Fujita) brought me into another project.  At the end of last year, Japan passed its first major federal fisheries reform laws in 70 years.  Their nearshore fishery is highly diverse, data-limited, and involves several gear types including a set net fishery that will be particularly difficult to regulate fairly.  Japan’s Fisheries Agency has sought EDF’s advice for potential strategies that could be utilized to manage their nearshore fisheries.  I conducted a literature review to find other case studies of nearshore fisheries management and strategies used to regulate stationary gill net fisheries that are similar to Japan’s set net fisheries.  Myself, Rod Fujita and Kazu Otsuka drafted a white paper containing our findings and advice.  It was really exciting to be directly involved in a project that will shape fisheries regulations in another country. 

Around the same time, I was able to join several members of the oceans team in a systems synthesis workshop focused on the infant industry of manufactured seafood.  Systems synthesis is a form of mapping relationships between variables that can affect an issue and how these interactions can shape the direction of possible outcomes.  The participants in the workshop each were assigned a different target group, ie the manufacturers, the consumers, the policy makers, then formed maps of outcomes.  At the end, these were combined into an infographic.  I was grateful to have been able to participate and to learn a completely new framework through which to view issues.    

I’ve also really been enjoying the social atmosphere at EDF. They are frequently having events in the office and they took all of us interns/fellows out for a hike at Point Reyes.

A Dive into Kenya & Tanzania’s Blue Economy

I came into my program knowing full well what my interests were and what exactly I wanted to focus on. When I was asked what I wanted to do for my CBE fellowship, the answer was simple–I wanted to contribute to the conservation of coral reefs. For as long as I can remember, I have always enjoyed snorkeling and, eventually, diving among the reefs in my home country, the Philippines. So when I was told about a chance to work on a blue economy assessment for Kenya and Tanzania that placed special emphasis on the importance of coral reefs and mangroves, I took on the opportunity.

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Building Resilient Fishery Globally with Environmental Defense Fund

This summer, I took a “great escape” from the California Coast to the Coast of New England. Boston has a different charm compared to California. This city is small but vibrant, yet full of culture and history. The EDF Boston office is located in historical downtown. In 1 mile radius, there are many historical sites that witnessed the establishment and development of United States as a nation, including the Boston Tea Party Ship, the Massachusetts State House, the Faneuil Hall (the site of several speeches by Samuel Adams, Benjamin Franklin and James Otis, etc), the Bunker Hill Monument, and many others.  I fell in love with the city immediately after arrival.

The EDF Boston office (I don’t mean to hurt your neck but I can’t rotate the picture >_<) 
View from the office: the historical Boston downtown

On June 11, I started my work at the Environmental Defense Fund Boston Office. I work with the EDF China Ocean team on two independent projects:  1. Identifying the most important species in China’s seafood market and assessing the their climate change vulnerabilities. 2. Compile case studies of sustainable fishery management initiatives and evaluate their feasibilities under China’s legal and cultural background. The Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment I’m working on is part of a Climate Roadmap that EDF Ocean Program and Zhejiang Fishery Institute initiated this year, and it’s a pioneer project that will help China develop its policy framework for sustainable and climate-ready fishery. This is a very ambitious project, but I feel very motivated because I, as well as many people, believe that climate-ready fishery its the foundation of all sustainable fishing initiatives we are visioning for the coming years.

A typical morning at work: reading research papers and EDF periodical while sipping on my coffee.

The scope of EDF’s work really impressed me. While the EDF Ocean team is leading the sustainable fishery projects domestically, the Ocean program has also extended the network to Mexico, Spain, Cuba, Chile, China, Japan, Philippines and Indonesia, and EDF Ocean team works very closely with scientists, institutes and fishery communities across the globe.  We have bi-weekly video-conference with EDF Ocean staff and its regional partners, and together we discuss the steps we need to take and what each of us can do to contribute to the overarching goal. I learned so much about different practices in different projects world-wide, and I’m witnessing a growing network of sustainable fishery management teams. Apart from me, there are 3 other EDF staff in the Boston office that focus on China Fishery project. We discuss our work process frequently and share our insights with each other, and we sometimes go sailing after work.

Sailing on the Charles River with my colleagues after work

I’m very grateful to have the chance to work with the wonderful team. The working culture in EDF is absolutely supportive and fun. Everyone (including high-level directors ) is so approachable and people are always willing to take their time to help me with whatever questions I have. Working for such a prestigious NGO is such a privilege and I’m always learning something new from the conversations I have with the staff in EDF, the webinars and the video-conferences. I will definitely look for opportunities to come back after the summer.

  

Willkommen am Alfred-Wegener-Institut für Polar- und Meeresforschung (AWI) Deutsches Arktisbüro. Translation: Welcome to the Alfred Wegener-Institut for Polar and Marine Research German Arctic Office.

Aside from the four million people that live in the high North (Arctic), I’m one of few from the lower latitude who wants to be 66°32’21”N of the equator. 🤷🏾‍♀️🥶 Geographically, that’s roughly the coordinates for where the Arctic Circle begins and the point of origin of my passion for all things Arctic. I’m not quite in the Arctic yet but my journey has only just begun! Presently, I write from 52°22’55″N, the location of the Alfred Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung Deutsches Arktisbüro (German Arctic Office) in Potsdam, Germany. More info on AWI German Arctic Office here: https://www.awi.de/en/about-us/transfer/arctic-office.html

The AWI and its German Arctic Office is located at the Albert Einstein Science Park situated on the Telegrafenberg next to Postdam.
part of the AWI and its German Arctic Office, among other research institutions are located at the Albert Einstein Science Park situated on the Telegrafenberg next to Postdam. The main AWI campus is located in Bremerhaven, Germany.

I am approaching my third week at the German Arctic Office as an Arctic policy research CBE fellow. I have again the pleasure of working with some of the brightest minds in the field of Arctic science and policy until the 20th of September. I arrived early to get the lay of the land and discovered a wonderful forest (pictured below) that I either walk or bike through to/from work most days. The first day I arrived I was greeted by Dr. Volker Rachold, Head of the AWI German Arctic Office and Lisa Grosfeld, Project Officer of AWI and the APECS (Association of Polar Early Career Scientists). It was like catching up on old but new times as we know some of the same people in the Arctic community. I began my research into Arctic law and governance on my first day. I started out in the AWIs old office (pictured above) and a week later we transitioned to the German Arctic Office’s new home, also on the grounds of the Albert Einstein Science Park campus. I was super stoked that my new desk was a very modern, sleek standing desk (pictured below). 😁 The equipment is stellar.

One can never be in the field of Arctic policy and science without the Polar bear.
Must have! This one belongs to Dr. Rachold.

Nostalgia: Three years ago I said to my MIIS professional career adviser, that I would like to work at the AWI. She and a few others had never heard of the AWI, nor has there been any MIIS student before me to intern or complete a CBE fellowship with the organization. A few conversations with some of my mentors (Dr. Kelly and Lawrence Hislop) and a Skype call later with Dr. Rachold and I’m headed to the place I vowed I would work at someday. I’m such a lucky gal! And am really happy to be working in such a small, intimate office with my colleagues. I practice my German language skills, share the fan with Lisa on very hot days 🥵 and have lunch with Lisa, Dr. Rachold and the Director of APECS almost everyday.

I enjoy walking and biking through the forest.
I love all things AWI!
Someone has to monitor the sea ice because what happens in the Arctic does not stay in the Arctic! Global Effects people! Global Effects!

As part of my CBE fellowship with the AWI, I will produce a fact sheet in German and English whose working title is Governance in der Arktis (Governance in the Arctic). The fact sheet will discuss the international laws and agreements and Indigenous rights, ownership (or lack thereof) and perspective of governance in the Arctic region. Additional highlights of my work include interviewing Arctic researchers at the Institute for Advanced Sustainable Studies (IASS), also in Potsdam, experts from the Arctic Centre in Lapland, Finland, the Woodrow Wilson Polar Initiative Center in Washington, D.C. and Indigenous representatives from the Indigenous Peoples Secretariat (IPS) in Tromsø, Norway.

The banners are up in the new office.

As warming accelerates and the sea ice in the Arctic continues to melt, the geopolitics of the region are shifting – prompting the question Who Owns the Arctic? This in large part is what the fact sheet will be about. Spoiler Alert: There are many moving parts (political, social and economic), regional and international actors, stakeholders and governing bodies that contribute to Arctic governance. Short political answer: Arctic ownership consists of a culturally, diverse mix of Indigenous communities (Aleut, Athabaskan, Gwich’in, Inuit, Saami and Russian Indigenous Peoples of the North) and eight Arctic Nation States (Canada, Denmark w/respect to Greenland and the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Russia and the USA). Stick around for future blog posts and you might want to be 66°32’21”N too. 😉

Lastly, I want to express my tremendous thanks to the donors that sponsored my CBE Fellowship. If it weren’t for your generous contribution I would not have this opportunity. I am forever grateful and humble! To: Dr. Volker Rachold, thank you for allowing me to work and learn under your direction. Prof. Jason Scorse, Chair of IEP and Director of the CBE, thank you for always accommodating my many plans and willingness to be flexible with me. You know I am always pushing the envelope. Dr. Brendan P. Kelly, my graduate supervisor, mentor, colleague and friend who always encourages me to follow my passion. Don’t worry you can still carry my bags. Dr. Lyuba Zarksy, MIIS IEP Prof., mentor and friend for guiding my professional and personal thoughts. Your moxie is grand! Prof. Monica Galligan, mentor and friend, for being there even when I didn’t think I needed you. Edy Rhodes, CACS Adviser, friend and colleague, for always helping and accommodating me, even when I don’t have an appointment. Rachel Christopherson, CBE Program Manager, for always smiling when I walk in the CBE and supporting me from every sideline possible. To my sister and best friend, Lisa Aiken who maintains that I live my best life and to follow my dreams. To my immediate family for contributing to my professional career and dream to become an Arctic policy expert. My MIIS IEP colleagues for all your love and support! I would not be half the person I am today if it weren’t for the people named here and countless others. I am forever in your debt!

If you have any questions, comments, or would like to connect and discuss Arctic affairs or otherwise, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Respectfully,

Kimberly Aiken

MAIEP, OCRM Candidate Class of 2020
CBE Fellow Arctic Policy 2019 @ The Alfred Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung Deutsches Arktisbüro

kaiken@miis.edu